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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL 
TOWN REPORT 




CHELMSFORD 
1986 



Photograph of Center Common by Jean Sougnez 



IN MEMORIAM 




JANET LOMBARD 
ASSESSOR 

1974-1986 




BRUCE N. FREEMAN 

STATE REPRESENTATIVE 

16th MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

1968-1986 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 
Location 



County 

Land Area: 

Population 1986: 

Assessed Valuation 1986 



Tax Rate: 

United States Representative in Congress: 

5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court: 

16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 



Board of Health 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 



Children's House 



McKay Library . 



School Superintendent 
Selectmen's Office 
Town Clerk 



Tax Collector & Treasurer 



Veterans' Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, 

Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. 

It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from 

Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

29,843 

$1,341,689,860.00 (Real Estate) 

$30,577,252.00 (Personal Property) 

$14.90 

Chester G. Atkins, Concord 

Carol C. Amick, Bedford 

Bruce N. Freeman, Chelmsford — deceased 

Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford - Nov. 1986 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m. 

Monday 1:00 p.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Tuesday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday .... 10:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 10:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday thru Thursday 1:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Sunday 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Tuesday in April 

Last Monday in April 

7:00 p.m. -every other Monday 

7:30 p.m. -every other Tuesday 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Wed. of month 

7:30 p.m. -4th Thursday of month 

8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tues. of month 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Mon. of month 

7:30 p.m. -1st Tuesday of month 



12 Precincts 
McCarthy Jr. High 
Town Offices 
Parker School 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
10 Wilson Street 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



On April 7, 1986, following the Town Elections, the 
Board of Selectmen met and elected John P. Emerson, Jr. 
as Chairman, Dennis J. Ready as Vice Chairman and 
Bonita A. Towle as Clerk. The membership of the Board 
includes Roger A. Blomgren and Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Highlights of 1986 are summarized below: 

At a Special Town Meeting held in January, the Fire- 
fighter's Union was denied a 7% increase, and the Town 
turned over the Highland School, North Town Hall, Louise 
Bishop Senior Center and the North School to the Hous- 
ing Authority to be used for elderly and low income hous- 
ing. The Board approved the expansion of the Heritage 
Inn, with the closing of Alpine Lane to Fletcher Street, 
despite some public opposition. 

In February Selectman Paul C. Hart announced that 
after fifteen years on the Board he will not seek re-election 
for a sixth term. Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Planning Board 
member for ten years, took out papers for a seat on the 
Board. The Selectmen continued work on the budget with 
the Finance Committee in preparation for the April An- 
nual Town Meeting. 

The disposal of the Town's trash continued to be an ongo- 
ing problem. The contract was put out for bid and four 



bids were received, but ultimately rejected and the con- 
tract was later put out for re-bid. The Resource Recovery 
Committee continued to study the proposed trash to energy 
plant in the City of Lowell. 

Selectman Paul Hart attended his last Board meeting 
the end of March and was surprised to have most of the 
Selectmen he had worked with over the past fifteen years 
in attendance. The Board proclaimed April 5, 1986 as Paul 
C. Hart Day in the Town of Chelmsford. 

Dennis J. Ready was re-elected for a third term and 
Henrick R. Johnson was elected for his first term on the 
Board in the Town Elections. A rail trail feasibility study 
was proposed, and the Board voted not to change proper- 
ty tax classification. 

May brought continued Town Meetings every Monday 
evening and Youth Government Day, an annual event spon- 
sored by the Elks, when High School students are elected 
by their peers to fill the positions of various elected and 
appointed Town officials for a day. The Board announced 
that they will study additional regulations of underground 
fuel storage tanks to further protect the Town's water supply. 

During the summer the Board began a search for a new 
Fire Chief, drafting a job description and setting a schedule 



for appointing. Chelmsford and Carlisle received a State 
grant for the purchase of the Cranberry Bog. One bid was 
received for the construction of a new Dog Pound, which 
was over $100,000 more than appropriated. 

In the fall the Board reactivated the Ambulance Study 
Committee. A public hearing was held on Route 110 traf- 
fic improvements. At a Special Town Meeting the voters 
approved monies to have a professional study made of the 
environmental impact study of the proposed trash plant 
being done for Browning Ferris Industries. The Blue Rib- 
bon Resource Recovery Committee was charged with 
screening consultants to perform this study. 

In October the Board requested the architect to draw 
up revised plans for the Dog Pound, and it was reported 
that the town polling places are all handicapped accessi- 
ble. November saw the Board for the first time vote to tax 
businesses at a slightly higher rate than residential. Ex- 
ecutive Secretary Howard W. Redfern, Jr. resigned at the 
end of November. 



Bernard Lynch was appointed Acting Executive Secretary 
by the Board at its first meeting in December. A Special 
Town Meeting changed the Town election day from the first 
Saturday to the first Tuesday in April, approved an exemp- 
tion to Prop. 2!/4 , if approved at the Town election, to pay 
for the construction of a new Senior Center on the North 
School site, and appropriated $50,000 for a feasibility study 
for the expansion/construction of library facilities. 

The Board of Selectmen continued their active role in 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, the Middlesex 
County Selectmen's Association, the Northern Middlesex 



Area Commission, the Middlesex County Advisory Board 
and the Massachusetts Municipal Association. Individual 
Selectmen also served as liaisons between the Board of 
Selectmen and various town and regional boards and com- 
missions during the year. 

Due to the fact that National and State legislative deci- 
sions have a great impact on Town affairs, the Board main- 
tained close contact with Congressman Atkins office as well 
as with Senator Carol Amick and the late State Representa- 
tive Bruce Freeman and newly-elected State Representa- 
tive Carol Cleven. The Selectmen wish to express their 
gratitude to Congressman Atkins, Senator Amick and 
Representatives Freeman and Cleven for their help and 
cooperation during the past year. 

In closing, the Selectmen, on behalf of the citizens of 
Chelmsford, wish to express their sincere gratitude to the 
various Town boards and committees for their ac- 
complishments during the past year. It should be 
remembered that these boards and committees are com- 
posed of unpaid volunteers who take many long hours out 
of their free time to work on issues and projects that benefit 
the Town of Chelmsford. The Board also would like to 
recognize our competent and dedicated office staff of Mrs. 
Judith Carter and Mrs. Beth Gibbs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren, Member 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Member 

Bernard Lynch, Executive Secretary 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth L. Delaney, Assistant Town Clerk 



Sporting 
Licenses 


Dog 

Licenses 

2727 


Kennel 

Licenses 
11 


Recorded 
Mortgages 


1580 


695 


Births inc. 


Deaths 
250 


Marriages 
300 


Intentions 


345 


305 


Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford 









Honorable Selectmen: 



We have examined the financial statements of the Town 
of Chelmsford, Massachusetts for the year ended June 30, 
1985, and have issued our report thereon dated February 
4, 1986. As part of our examination, we made a study and 
evaluation of the town's system of internal accounting con- 
trol to the extent we considered necessary to evaluate the 
system as required by generally accepted auditing stan- 
dards. Under these standards, the purposes of such an 
evaluation are to establish a basis for reliance on the system 
of internal accounting control in determining the nature, 
timing and extent of other auditing procedures that are 
necessary for expressing an opinion on the financial 
statements and to assist the auditor in planning and per- 
forming his examination of the financial statements. 

Our examination of the financial statements made in 
accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, in- 
cluding the study and evaluation of the town's system of in- 
ternal accounting control for the year ended June 30, 1985, 
would not necessarily disclose all weaknesses in the system 
because it was based on selective tests of accounting records 
and related data. However, such study and evaluation 
disclosed the following weaknesses that we believe should 
be brought to your attention. 

While this report may appear to portray a one-sided pic- 
ture of the town's operations, its main objective is to point 
out areas of concern that we feel should be corrected. 

Town Accountant — Appropriation 

As noted in our previous audit report, a review of town 
meeting votes from the Stabilization Fund revealed that 
only the amount actually expended was recorded as a 
transfer from the fund. 

If the project for which the transfer was made had not 
been completed, it would not be recorded on the books 
of the town as a continuing appropriation. 

We recommend that transfers voted from the Stabiliza- 
tion Fund be transferred as voted and all transactions be 
recorded in the appropriation account. The Town Accoun- 
tant has agreed to implement this procedure. 



Purchasing 

The purchasing function is decentralized. Subject to cer- 
tain limitations, various departments are allowed to initiate 
purchases, invite bids, and enter into contracts. We sug- 
gest that the town review its entire purchasing and pro- 
curement function to determine if centralized purchasing 
could achieve both an economic savings and strengthen the 
control over purchases. Whether or not purchasing remains 
decentralized, we recommend that a prenumbered four- 
part purchase order system be implemented at all depart- 
mental levels for purchase of commodities. Operation of 
the four-part purchase order system would be as follows: 

1. To vendor as authorization for purchase. 



2. For departmental files. 

3. To be utilized as a receiving report, signed by a 
responsible town official to indicate receipt of goods. 
This copy is matched with the vendor's invoice and 
sent with the authorization for payment to the ac- 
counting department to initiate the payment process. 

4. To be utilized as an input document for the recom- 
mended full encumbrance system of accounting. 

The foregoing conditions were considered in determin- 
ing the nature, extent and timing of audit tests we applied 
in our examination of the financial statements and this 
report does not modify our financial report dated February 
4, 1986. 

Our examination uncovered other minor weaknesses in 
the accounting internal control system that we considered 
to be immaterial and accordingly did not affect the nature, 
timing or extent of our substantive testing. 

During our examination of the Town of Chelmsford's in- 
ternal control system, the forementioned weaknesses were 
discussed with the town's management personnel respon- 
sible for that particular accounting function. In this regard, 
we would appreciate receiving, at your earliest convenience, 



any thoughts you may have with respect to implementing 
our recommendations and a proposed timetable for same. 

In conclusion, we wish to take this opportunity to thank 
you for your cooperation during the course of our audit . 



It is very important that you commence corrective ac- 
tion on these weaknesses immediately. We would be pleas- 
ed to assist you in developing such a corrective course of 
action should you so desire. 

Sincerely, 



Kenneth A. Marchurs, Director 

Bureau of Accounts 

Department of Revenue 



WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

JANUARY 27, 1986 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby rquested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School 
Auditorium on Monday evening, the twenty-seventh day 
of January 1986, at 7:30 P.M., then and there to act upon 
the following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Section 13, Chapter 188 of the acts of 1985 
providing that the Town of Chelmsford School Department 
may accept grants from the Commissioner of Education 
in order to establish Professional Grant Programs for the 
purposes of supplementing school employees compensation 
in said Town, conditioned upon the funding of said pro- 
grams by any source other than the Town of Chelmsford, 
and further conditioned upon, to the extent permitted by 
law, that said professional grant programs, and any monies 
paid to any employee of the School Department, shall not 
be used or considered a past practice for the purpose of 
collective bargaining and shall be nonrecurring lump sum 
payment not built into school employees salary schedules; 
or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town of Chelmsford will vote 
to accept the Professional Development Grant for Nashoba 
Valley Technical High School under the provisions of Sec- 
tion 13 of Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985 for a sum of 
$35,551.00 for 1986 and $25,304.00 for 1987 conditioned 
upon the funding of said programs by any source other than 
thw Town of Chelmsford, and further conditioned upon, 
to the extent permitted by law, that said professional grant 
programs, and any monies paid to any employee of the 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School, shall not be used 
or considered a past practice for the purpose of collective 
bargaining and shall be nonrecurring lump sum payment 
not built into school employees salary schedules; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School District Committee 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Sec- 
tion 8J, providing that the Town is authorized to establish 
a handicapped commission for the purpose of coordinating 
or carrying out programs designed to meet the problems 
of the handicapped in coordination with programs of the 
office of handicapped affairs; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
available funds a certain sum of money from Line Item 
#124 Unclassified Department— County Retirement Assess- 
ment to the following line items: 

Line Item #12 Cemetery Department — Salaries. 
Line Item #54 Insurance Department— all liability. 

Line Item #76 Public Buildings — salaries. 

Or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money with which to meet bills of previous years; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, appraisers, 
attorneys and other necessary consultants for the purpose 
of development and establishment of a plan for the laying 
out of a public way a certain parcel of land from Fletcher 
Street to Alpine Lane, pursuant to General Law c.82 S.22, 
23, and 24 and further see if the Town will vote to establish 
an advisory committee, consisting of 5 members, to be ap- 
pointed by the Board of Selectmen and to consist of 
members from the Chelmsford community to review this 
matter and report to the Selectmen concerning the same, 
and further to see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate, or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses, 
with all said contracts to be made under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple by pur- 
chase, eminent domain, or otherwise, the property located 
from Fletcher Street through Parlmont Plaza, known as 
Alpine Lane, in the Town of Chelmsford, and to see if the 
Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from 
available funds, or borrow a certain sum of money to defray 
all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with 
the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages 
which may be awarded as a result of any such taking; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire an easement, by pur- 
chase, by eminent domain or otherwise, on the property 
described as parcel C on a certain plan on file with the 
Town Clerk and the Town Engineer entitled "Easement 
Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Ma. prepared for the Town 
of Chelmsford, Scale 1" = 40', June 6, 1985, by 
Vanasse/Hangen Engineering, Inc. , Consulting Engineers 
and Planners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, Boston, Massachu- 



setts" and further bounded and described as the property 
beginning at a point at the intersection of the westerly line 
of Mill Road and the northerly line of Elizabeth Drive, 
thence along the northerly line of Elizabeth Drive, 
S64 — 39'— 07" W, 194.96 feet; thence on said parcel C, 
along a curved line to the left, having a radius of 207.00 
feet, a distance of 70.77 feet' thence on said Parcel C, 
N20— 14'— 55 "E, 135.77 feet; thence on said Parcel C, 
along a curved line to the right, having a radius of 207.00 
feet, a distance of 51.74 feet; thence on the westerly line 
of Mill Road along a curved line to the left, having a radius 
of 960.47 feet, a distance of 166.44 feet to the point of 
beginning, for the purpose of constructing improvements, 
widening, laying out and accepting Mill Road, State Road 
and Billerica Road, and to see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate, or transfer from available funds or bor- 
row a certain sum of money to defray all necessary costs, 
fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition of said 
land for paying any damages which may be awarded as 
the result of any such taking; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of purchase and installation of 
a telephone communications system at the Town Office 
Building or other appropriate locations with the Town, said 
contracts to be made under the supervision of the Board 
of Selectmen; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money to the appropriate salary line items to fund ap- 
proved wage and salary increases and expense allocations 
in the following departmental accounts: 

Salary Account: Fire Department 
Expense Account: Fire Department 

and any other departmental budget recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen at the Special Town Meeting; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, appraisers, 
attorneys, architects, and other necessary consultants for 
the purpose of preparing and designing all documents re- 
quired to design and construct a storage facility for the 
Town of Chelmsford, and further to see if the Town will 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and 
execute all necessary and proper contracts and agreements 
thereto, and further to see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow 
a certain sum of money to defray all necessary costs, fees, 
and expenses; or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the School Committee to transfer, release or otherwise con- 
vey the care, custody, management, control, and all other 
right, title and interest if any, held by the School Commit- 
tee, to the Board of Selectmen in a parcel of land and 
buildings thereon known as The Highland School and con- 
taining approximately 32,990 square feet more or less as 
shown on the records on the Chelmsford Board of Assessors 
Map 14, Lot 133 for the exclusive and specific use of fami- 
ly housing; or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey all right, title and interest, if any, held by 
the Town, in a parcel of land and buildings thereon, known 
as the Highland School and containing approximately 
32,990 square feet, more or less, as shown on the records 
of the Chelmsford Board of Assessors, Map 14, Lot 133, 
to the Chelmsford Housing Authority, for the exclusive and 
specific use of family housing provided that the Town con- 
structs and/or obtains storage facilities deemed adequate 
by the Board of Selectmen; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey all right, title and interest, if any, held by 
the Town in a parcel of land and buildings thereon, known 
as the North Town Hall, and being described in a deed 
dated February 1, 1853, from Benjamin Adams and 
Thomas J. Adams, to the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Chelmsford, recorded in Middlesex North Registry of Deeds 
at Book 18, Page 33 and Middlesex South Registry of Deeds 
at Book 659, Page 495; to the Chelmsford Housing Authori- 
ty, for the exclusive and specific use of family housing pro- 
vided that the Town constructs and/or obtains storage 
facilities deemed adequate by the Board of Selectmen; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the School Committee to transfer, release, or otherwise con- 
vey the care, custody, management, control, and all other 
right, title and interest if any in a parcel of land known 
as the North School, containing approximately 17.19 acres 
of land, more or less, and being a portion of the property 
taken by the Town of Chelmsford by Order of Taking dated 
January 17, 1951, recorded in the Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Book 1161, Page 258, to the Board of 
Selectmen, 33.5% (6 acres) of which shall be for the ex- 
clusive and specific use of Elderly and/or Family Housing 
by the Chelmsford Housing Authority; or act in relation 
thereto. 

School Committee 



Board of Selectmen 



10 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey all right, title and in- 
terest, if any in two parcels of land consisting of a total 
of six acres, being a portion of the property taken by the 
Town of Chelmsford by order of taking dated January 17, 
1951, and recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry 
of Deeds, Book 1161, Page 258 to the Chelmsford Housing 
Authority Five (5) acres of which shall be for the exclusive 
and specific use of Elderly Housing and one (1) acre of 
which shall be for the exclusive and specific use of Family 
Housing contingent upon the Town taking affirmative ac- 
tion on Article 15 of this Special Town Meeting; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to rescind Ar- 
ticle 20 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1982, passed at 
the session held on May 10, 1982; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow, a 
certain sum of money to construct a senior center on the 
property under the control of the Board of Selectmen at 
the North School and being a portion of the property taken 
by the Town of Chelmsford by order of taking dated 
January 17, 1951 and recorded in the Middlesex North Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds, Book 1161, Page 258, said contracts 
to be made under the supervision of the Board of Select- 
men and contingent upon the Town taking affirmative ac- 
tion on Article 15 of this Special Town Meeting; or act in 
relation thereto. 



Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. Given 
unto our hands this 9th day of January, A.D. 1986. 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren, Member 

Paul C. Hart, Member 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



January 9, 1986 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: The New Town Office Building Gym; North Con- 
gregational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room; East 
Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafeteria; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; North Congregational Church Hall; 
McCarthy Junior High School, Small Gymnasium; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; McCarthy Junior High School, 
Small Gymnasium; fourteen days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey all right, title and interest, if any, held by 
the Town in a parcel of land and buildings thereon, known 
as The Louise Bishop Senior Center, located at 15 Mill 
Road and containing approximately 15,760 square feet, 
more or less, as shown on the record of the Chelmsford 
Board of Assessors, Plat 140, Block 37, Lot 2; to the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority, contingent upon the Town 
completing construction of a Senior Center on the North 
School property and contingent upon the Town taking af- 
firmative action on Article 15 of this Special Town Meeting; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$20,000 for the purpose of the erection of pre-cast con- 
crete communication building to house a new repeater and 
emergency generator; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Assessors to issue a certain amount of money from 



A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence, 
Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

January 27, 1986 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:45 
PM by the Moderator Dennis McHugh who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 553 voters present, at 
the McCarthy Jr. High Auditorium. 

Selectman Ready moved that the reading of the Con- 
stable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman Ready 
then moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waiv- 
ed. It was so voted. 

The Moderator announced that the League of Women 
voters had assembled a book entitled "This is Chelmsford." 
This book consists of information of various boards, those 
elected and appointed, and explains how the Town Meeting 
form of government operates. The book is available for 
public sale. The Moderator acknowledged that Dorothy 
Lerer, a teller for many, many years at Annual and Special 



11 



Town Meetings passed away recently and publicly noted 
thanks to her for her years of service. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Chairman of the School Com- 
mittee, Carl A. Olsson, moved that the Town vote to ac- 
cept the provisions of section 13, chapter 188 of the acts 
of 1985 providing that the Town of Chelmsford School 
Department may accept grants from the Commissioner of 
Education in order to establish Professional Grant Pro- 
grams for the purposes of supplementing school employees 
compensation in said Town, conditioned upon the funding 
of said programs by any source other than the Town of 
Chelmsford, and further conditioned upon, to the extent 
permitted by law, that said professional grant programs, 
and any monies paid to any employee of the School Depart- 
ment, shall not be used or considered a past practice for 
the purpose of collective bargaining and shall be nonrecur- 
ring lump sum payment not built into school employees 
salary schedules. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Chairman of the School Com- 
mittee, Stratos G. Dukakis, moved that the Town of 
Chelmsford vote to accept the Professional Development 
Grant for Nashoba Valley Technical High School under the 
provisions of section 13 of chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985 
for a sum of $36,551.00 for 1986 and $25,304.00 for 1987 
conditioned upon the funding of said programs by any 
source other than the Town of Chelmsford, and further 
conditioned upon the funding of said programs by any 
source other than the Town of Chelmsford, and further 
conditioned upon, to the extent permitted by law, that said 
professional grant programs, and any monies paid to any 
employee or the Nashoba Valley Technical High School, 
shall not be used or considered a past practice for the pur- 
pose of collective bargaining and shall be nonrecurring 
lump sum payment not built into school employee salary 
schedules. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to accept 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 8J, providing that the Town is authorized to 
establish a Handicapped Commission for the purpose of 
coordinating or carrying out programs designed to meet 
the problems of the handicapped in coordination with pro- 
grams of the Office of Handicapped Affairs. 

Selectman Ready spoke in favor of the article, and ex- 
plained that this commission is to be established in the town 
by state law as soon as possible, and felt that the town has 
an immediate need for such a commission. The Finance 
Committee felt that the article should appear on the An- 
nual Town Meeting warrant, that it is not an emergency 
article. Selectman Ready explained that the town is in viola- 
tion of the state law, thus the reasoning for having the ar- 
ticle on this warrant. Sandra McDonald spoke in favor of 



the article, and felt that once the Town Meeting body voted 
so, a commission would be established. The article isn't re- 
questing any monies at this point, just permission to 
establish a commission. A brief discussion took place. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article, motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to transfer 
the sum of seventy eight thousand two hundred nineteen 
dollars ($78,219.00) from line Item #124 Unclassified 
Department— County Retirement Assessment to the follow- 
ing line items 



Line Item #12 Cemetery Department 
Salaries 



$3,999.00 



Line Item #54 Insurance Department all 

liability $69,520.00 

Line Item #76 Public Buildings Salaries $4,700.00 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to transfer 
from Free Cash the sum of one thousand twenty one dollars 
and ninety-two cents ($1,021.92) with which to meet bills 
of previous years. 

Selectman Ready explained that the two bills came in 
after the fiscal year had closed on July 1, 1985 and that 
they needed to be paid. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, appraisers, 
attorneys and other necessary consultants for the purpose 
of development and establishment of a plan for the laying 
out of a public way a certain parcel of land from Fletcher 
Street to Alpine Lane, pursuant to General Law. C.82 
S.22.23, and 24 and further I moved that the Town vote 
to establish an Advisory Committee consisting of 5 mem- 
bers, to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen and to 
consist of members from the Chelmsford community to 
review this matter and report to the Selectmen concern- 
ing the same, and further I moved that the Town vote to 
transfer from Free Cash the sum of twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000.00) to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses, 
with all said contracts to be made under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen. 

Selectman Ready explained that this article was being 
submitted by the Board of Selectmen because of the word- 
ing of an article brought forth to them by petition was ruled 
out of order by Town Counsel, and was going to be with- 
drawn by the proponent. Selectman Ready asked for the 
proponent of the petition article to come forward and speak 
about this article. Michael Vatalaro explained the article, 



12 



said that the citizens of the town had access for twenty years 
of the roadway in question, as did the Police and Fire 
Departments. Due to this he felt that the road should be 
left open for public use and asked for support of the arti- 
cle. The Finance Committee was against the article, as well 
as the Board of Selectmen. Attorney Shanahan who repre- 
sented Emil Dumont, the owner of the land (roadway) gave 
a presentation explaining why his client was against re- 
opening the access. A discussion took place, Town Counsel 
James Harrington stated that the Town denied over the 
years any ownership concerning the roadway by not main- 
taining the way, thus court cases did not hold the Town 
responsible when charges of neglect were filed. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article, motion 
defeated, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Petitioner, Mary Vatalaro, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to withdraw this article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 8 Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men, Dennis Ready moved that the Town vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire an easement, by pur- 
chase, by eminent domain or otherwise on property describ- 
ed as Parcel C on a certain plan on file with the Town Clerk 
and the Town Engineer entitled "Easement Plan of Land 
in Chelmsford, Ma. prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Scale 1"40', June 6, 1985, by Vanasse/Hangen Engineer- 
ing, Inc., consulting engineers and planners, 60 Birm- 
ingham Parkway, Boston, Massachusetts and further 
bounded and described as the property beginning at a 
point at the intersection of the westerly line of Mill Road 
and the northerly line of Elizabeth Drive, thence along the 
northerly line of Elizabeth Drive, S64-39 : 07"W. 194.96 feet; 
thence on said Parcel C. along a curved line to the left, 
having a radius of 207.00 feet, a distance of 70.77 feet; 
thence on said Parcel C, N20-14-55"E, 135.77 feet; thence 
on said Parcel C, along a curved line to the right, having 
a radius of 207.00 feet, a distance of 51.74 feet; thence on 
the westerly line of Mill Road along a curved line to the 
left, having a radius of 960.47 feet, a distance of 166.44 
feet to the point of beginning, for the purpose of construc- 
ting improvements, widening laying out and accepting Mill 
Road, State Road and Billerica Road, and I move that the 
Town vote to transfer from Free Cash the sum of one dollar 
($1.00) to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in 
connection with the acquisition of said land for paying any 
damages which may be awarded as the result of any such 
taking. 

Selectman Ready spoke in favor of the article. The 
Finance Committee was in favor. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 9 Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to transfer 
from free cash the sum of thirty-five thousand dollars 
($35,000.00) for the purpose of purchase and installation 
of a telephone communications system at the Town Office 



Building or other appropriate locations within the Town, 
said contracts to be made under the supervision of the 
Board of Selectmen. 

Selectman Ready spoke in favor of the article. The 
Finance Committee felt that the article should be on the 
upcoming Annual Town Meeting warrant. The Capital 
Planning Committee supports the article. Howard Redfem, 
the Executive Secreary explained the article in more detail. 
The Moderator attempted a voice vote, which left the chair 
in doubt. The following tellers came forward and a hand 
count was taken: 



Jocelyn Anthony 
Cheryl Warshafsky 
David Fenn 
Eleanor Gilroy 
Barbara Ward 
Gail Klemmer 



Virginia Cooney 
Jack Peters 
Margaret Johnson 
Natalie Driscoll 
Richard Lahue 



a %'s vote required, Yes 265 No 183, 298 was needed, mo- 
tion defeated. 



UNDER ARTICLE 10 Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to 
trasnfer from Free Cash the sum of one hundred forty-eight 
thousand six hundred sixty-one dollars ($148,661.00) to the 
appropriate salary line items to fund approved wage and 
salary increases and expense allocations in the following 
departmental accounts: 

Line Item 32 Fire Department Salary 

Account: $147,111.00 

Line Item 33 Fire Department Expense 

Account: $1,550.0 

Selectman Ready spoke in favor of the article, stating 
that the Fire Department and the Board of Selectmen had 
negotiated in good faith, and felt that it was a fair con- 
tract. Chairman of the Finance Committee, Elizabeth Mar- 
shall, said that the Finance Committee was against the 
requested increase and gave a presentation explaining why. 
Harold Pierce President of the Firefighters Union, spoke 
in favor of the article. A lengthy discussion took place. 
George Gordon moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked if there was a need for further debate? 
Hearing none, he proceeded to ask for a vote on the arti- 
cle. Edward Hilliard moved to have the vote taken by silent 
ballot. The Moderator explained the procedure that would 
take place in order to have a vote taken by silent ballot. 
He asked for a voice vote on the motion for a silent ballot, 
motion defeated. He then asked for a voice vote on the 
main motion, motion defeated. William Dalton question- 
ed the voice vote. The Moderator asked for the tellers to 
come forward and conduct a hand count. A %'s vote is 
required Yes 195 No 236, the motion was defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 The Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. Selectman Ready explained the pur- 
pose of the article. George Nelson of the Finance Comm. 
moved to amend the article to include after the 



13 



($20,000.00) "to budget line item #135 "Preliminary Pro- 
ject Studies". The Capital Planning Committee was in favor 
of the motion. The Selectmen were in favor of the motion 
to amend. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to amend, motion carried. He then asked for a 
voice vote on the main motion as amended, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Dennis Ready, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to engage engineers, appraisers, attorneys, architects, 
and other necessary consultants for the purpose of prepar- 
ing and designing all documents required to design and 
construct a storage facility for the Town of Chelmford, and 
further moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all necessary and 
proper contracts and agreements thereto, and further 
moved that the Town vote to transfer from free cash the 
sum of twenty thousand dollars ($20,000.00) to budget line 
item #135 "Preliminary Project Studies." 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Chairman of the School Com- 
mittee, Carl Olsson, moved that the Town vote to authorize 
the School Committee to transfer, release or otherwise con- 
vey the care, custody, management, control, and all other 
right, title and interest if any held by the School Commit- 
tee, to the Board of Selectmen in a parcel of land and 
buildings thereon known as the Highland School and con- 
taining approximately 32,990 square feet more or less as 
shown on the records of the Chelmsford Board of Assessors 
Map 14, Lot 133 for the exclusive and specific use of fami- 
ly housing. 

Chairman of the School Committee, Carl Olsson, spoke 
about the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be 
determined, to convey all right, title and interest, if any, 
held by the Town, in a parcel of land and buildings 
thereon, known as the Highland School and containing ap- 
proximately 32,990 square feet, more or less, as shown on 
the records of the Chelmsford Board of Assessors, Map 14, 
Lot 133, to the Chelmsford Housing Authority, for the ex- 
clusive and specific use of family housing provided that the 
Town constructs and/or obtains storage facilities deemed 
adequate by the Board of Selectmen. 

The Board of Selectmen support the article. The Finance 
Committee recommends the article. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen for consideration to be 
determined, to convey all right, title and interest, if any, 
held by the Town in a parcel of land and buildings thereon, 
known as the North Town Hall, and being described in 
a deed dated February 1, 1853, from Benjamin Adams and 
Thomas J. Adams, to the inhabitants of the Town of 



Chelmsford, recorded in Middlesex North Registry of Deeds 
at Book 18, Page 33 and Middlesex South Registry of Deeds 
at Book 659, Page 495; to the Chelmsford Housing Authori- 
ty, for the exclusive and specific use of family housing pro- 
vided that the Town constructs and/or obtains storage 
facilities deemed adequate by the Board of Selectmen. 

The Board of Selectmen support the article. A resident 
from the area voiced concern about parking problems, and 
the number of units. Ruth Delaney, of the Housing Authori- 
ty explained that two units would make up the total 
number, and felt that there wouldn't be any parking pro- 
blem at all. More discussion took place, the Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Chairman of the School Com- 
mittee, Carl Olsson, moved that the Town vote to authorize 
the School Committee to transfer, release, or otherwise con- 
vey the care, custody, management, control, and all other 
right, title and interest if any in a parcel of land known 
as the North school, containing approximately 17.19 acres 
of land, more or less and being a portion of the property 
taken by the Town of Chelmsford by order of taking dated 
January 17, 1951, recorded in the Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Book 1161, page 258, to the Board of 
Selectmen subject to the condition that 33.5% (6 acres) 
of said parcel shall be for the exclusive and specific use 
of Elderly and/or Family Housing by the Chelmsford Hous- 
ing Authority. 

The School Committee and the Finance Committee were 
in favor of the motion. A discussion followed, questions 
were asked, and answered. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen for consideration to be 
determined to convey all right, title and interest, if any in 
two parcels of land consisting of a total of six acres, being 
a portion of the property taken by the Town of Chelmsford 
by order of taking dated January 17, 1951, and recorded 
in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 
1161, page 258 to the Chelmsford Housing Authority Five 
(5) acres of which shall be for the exclusive and specific 
use of Elderly Housing and one (1) acre of which shall be 
for the exclusive and specific use of Family Housing con- 
tingent upon the Town taking affirmative action on Arti- 
cle 15 of this Special Town Meeting. 

The Board of Selectmen support the article. The Finance 
Committee recommend the article. George Merrill wanted 
to know why the elderly weren't getting all the land instead 
of just 6 acres, just what was the rest going to be used for. 
Selectman Ready showed the area on a map and explain- 
ed that sixty four units of Elderly Housing, a Senior Citizen 
Center and parking for same, recreation fields and parks, 
Family housing units and the rest would be for conserva- 
tion land. Ruth Delaney explained that the Selectmen con- 
trolled the land left over from what was given to the 
Housing Authority, and decided to divide it up as - listed. 
A lengthy discussion took place. August Mueller moved the 



14 



question to stop debate. The Moderator asked if there was 
any need for further debate, hearing none he asked for a 
voice vote on the motion. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to res- 
cind Article 20 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1982, passed 
at the session held on May 10, 1982. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. This 
was money that was to be used for designs and plans for 
the North School property. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to ap- 
propriate and transfer from the Stabilization Fund the sum 
of two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000.00) to design 
and construct a senior center on the property under the 
control of the Board of Selectmen at the North School, 
and being a portion of the property taken by the Town of 
Chelmsford by order of taking dated January 17, 1951 and 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, 
Book 1161, page 258, said contracts to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen and contingent upon 
the Town taking affirmative action on Article 15 of this 
Special Town Meeting. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of the article. The 
Capital Planning Commission is against the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Chairman of the Board of 
Selectman, Dennis Ready, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen for consideration to be 
determined, to convey all right, title and interest, if any 
held by the Town in a parcel of land and buildings thereon, 
known as the Louise Bishop Senior Center, located at 15 
Mill Road and containing approximately 15,760 square 
feet, more or less, as shown on the record of the Chelms- 
ford Board of Assessors, Plat 140, Block 37, Lot 2; to the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority, contingent upon the Town 
completing construction of a Senior Center on the North 
School property and contingent upon the Town taking af- 
firmative action on Article 15 of this Special Town Meeting. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 Dwight Hayward, member of 
the Finance Committee moved to amend the article by 
substituting the following after the word ($20,000) "to pur- 
chase a new repeater and emergency generator and to erect 
a precast concrete communication building to house such 
equipment." 

The Capital Planning Committee was in favor of the mo- 
tion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion 
to amend, motion carried. He then asked for a voice vote 
on the main motion as amended, motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 



Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Dennis Ready, 
moved that the Town vote to transfer from Free Cash the 
sum of twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) to purchase a 
new repeater and emergency generator and to erect a pre- 
cast concrete communication building to house such 
equipment. 

William Dalton moved to reconsider Article 10, and ex- 
plained why he felt that the Article should be brought back 
on the floor for another vote. Philip Currier spoke in favor 
of reconsideration. Gordon Reed spoke against the motion. 
A lengthy discussion followed. Edward Marshall moved to 
stop debate. The Moderator asked if there was any need 
for further debate, hearing none he asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to reconsider, which left the chair in doubt, 
the tellers came forward and a hand count was taken. The 
Result— Yes 148 No 171, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee, Elizabeth Marshall moved that the Town vote to 
instruct the Board of Assessors to issue the sum of one 
million one hundred thousand dollars ($1,100,000.00) from 
Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate. 

The Finance Committee asked for support of the arti- 
cle. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

George Ripsom moved to adjourn the meeting. Motion 
carried. The meeting adjourned at 11:00 PM. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR 

THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 5, 1986 and April 28, 1986 

Middlesex, SS. 

To the constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, Viz: 

Precinct 1. The New Town Office Building Gym- 
nasium 

Precinct 2. North Congregational Church Hall 

Precinct 3. Parker School Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westland School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Congregational Church Hall 

Precinct 8. McCarthy Junior High School, Small 
Gymnasium 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 



15 



Precinct 11. Westlands School Cafeteria 
Precinct 12. McCarthy Junior High School, Small 
Gymnasium 

On Saturday, the fifth (5th) day of April, 1986, being 
the first Saturday in said month, at 8:00 A.M., for the 
following purposes: 

To bring in their vote for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years 

One Member of the Board of Assessors for three years 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

One Member of Housing Authority for five years 

One Member of Board of Health for three years 

One Park Commissioner for three years 

One Constable for three years 

One Sewer Commissioner for three years 

Two Members of Public Library Trustees for three years 

Two Members of School Committee for three years 

Two Planning Board Members for three years 

The poles will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M.; 
and to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School Gym- 
nasium on Monday, the twenty-eight (28th) day of April, 
1986, at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there 
to act upon the following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of the Town Officers and 
Committees; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law to be effective July 1, 
1986, as follows: 

1. Under Section 3, subtitled Personnel Board, delete 
the entire Section and substitute the following in its 
place. 

The Plan shall be administered by a Personnel 
Director. The Personnel Director shall be hired by 
and report directly to the Executive Secretary. The 
duties of said Personnel Director shall, under the ad- 
ministrative directions of the Executive Secretary, in- 
clude, but not be limited to: 

(1) developing, administering, and managing, with 
full accountability, all the Town's personnel func- 
tions and activities, including, but not limited 
to, recruitment, screening applicants, orienta- 



tion, development of training programs,, salary, 
wages, benefits, counseling, unemployment com- 
pensation, labor contract administration, and 
collective bargaining: 

(2) implementing, maintaining, and/or ad- 
ministrating, an Affirmative Action Program, 
Equal Employment Opportunity Policies and 
Procedures, Civil Service regulations, perfor- 
mance evaluation and promotion procedures as 
well as all personnel record retention practices: 

(3) such other job related duties, functions, and 
responsibilities as assigned to said Personnel 
Director by the Executive Secretary. 

(4) The Executive Secretary shall be responsible for 
carrying out all the duties of said Personnel 
Director, until said Personnel Director is hired, 
and during all interm periods, without any ad- 
ditional compensation. 

All references to the "Personnel Board", or 
"Board" shall be deleted from all sections and 
subsections of the Personnel wage and salary By- 
Law, and replaced with the word Personnel 
Director. 

The Personnel Director shall have, in addition 
to the above responsibilities, duties and func- 
tions, all responsibilities duties and functions 
which existed heretofor in the Personnel Board. 

2. Under Section 5, subtitled Records, delete the en- 
tire Section and substitute the following in its place: 

A central personnel file for all employees subject to 
this plan shall be established and maintained in the 
office of the Personnal Director. They shall contain 
vital statistics, record of wages or salaries and of 
changes in wages and salaries and such other infor- 
mation as may be requested by the Personnel 
Director. 

3. Under Section 6, subtitled Classification of Town 
Employees, Amend Subsection "E" "Wage and Salary 
Schedule" by deleting the existing schedule and 
substituting the following: 

E. WAGE AND SALARY SCHEDULE 
JULY 1, 1986-JUNE 30, 1987 
Grade Level Salary Range 

1A $12,065 - $15,021 

IB 13,637 - 16,978 

1C 15,210 - 18,936 

ID 18,357 - 22,854 

2 23,078 - 28,732 

3 30,947 - 38,529 

4 35,669 - 44,408 

5 40,390 - 50,286 

4. Under Section 6, subtitled Classification of Town 



16 



Employees, add a new Subsection (F) "Longevity 
Payments": 

(F) Longevity payments shall be provided to each 
regular full time employee covered by this Plan 
as shown below. Longevity is added to the base 
pay. It shall not be used when, computing over- 
time, for purposes of retirement or sick leave. 
Longevity shall be paid semi-annually on the first 
pay day in December and the first pay day in 
June. Longevity shall be paid on a pro-rata basis. 

(1) Upon completion of five years full time 
employment, said employee shall receive a 
1 V& percent increment over and above their 
base pay. 

(2) Upon completion of ten years full time 
employment, said employee shall receive a 

3 percent increment over and above their 
base pay. 

(3) Upon completion of fifteen years full time 
employment, said employee shall receive a 

4 V2 percent increment over and above their 
base pay. 

(4) Upon completion of twenty years full time 
employment, said employee shall receive a 
6 percent increment over and above their 
base pay. 

5. Under Section 7, subtitled Hiring of New 
Employees, delete Subsection B and substitute the 
following in its place: 

(B) No person shall be employed by the Town until 
such person has a medical examination by a 
licensed practicing physician certifying that such 
person is physically able to perform the duties 
for which he or she is to be hired. The physician 
shall be designated by the Personnel Director. All 
certifications shall become a permanent part of 
the person's personnel records, provided that this 
requirement shall not apply to persons already 
employed by the Town on the effective date of 
this Amendment, except as provided in Section 
16 of the By-Law; 

6. Under Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Stan- 
dards Rates of Wages and Salaries of the Person- 
nel Wage and Salary By-Law", by adding the 
following positions: 

Administrative: Clerical 

14. Personnel Director 

Library 

8. Library Assistant Director; 



or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 2A. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law by further amen- 
ding Section 24, Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages 
and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law, 

to conform to rates of pay negotiated by the Town with cer- 
tain labor organizations, pursuant to General Laws Chapter 
150E, and to reflect current salaries and grade levels under 
the Personnel By-Law as follows: 



ADMINISTRATIVE & CLERICAL 

1. Executive Secretary 

2. Town Accountant 

3. Veteran's Agent 

4. Town Aide 

5. Assistant to Assessors 

6. Assistant Town Clerk 

7. Assistant Treasurer 

8. Clerk, Senior 

9. Clerk, Junior 

10. Clerk, Part-Time 

11. Town Counsel 

12. Board of Reg., Three Members . 

13. Assistant Town Accountant 

14. Personnel Director 



CONSERVATION, PARKS & CEMETERY 

Cemetery Superintendent 

Supt. of Inspect & Pest Control 

Landscaper— Park 

Laborer — Park 

Unskilled Laborer 

Skilled Forest Workman— Conservation . 

Equipment Operator 

Park Superintendent 



CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodian . 



LIBRARY 

Library Director . . .• 

Library Department Head . 

Library Specialist 

Library Assistant 

Library Clerk 

■ Assistant .... 



Library Assistant Director 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1. Highway Superintendent 

2. Highway Foreman 



TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Fire Department 

2. Deputy Fire Chief 

3. Captain 

4. Mechanic (Fire & Police) . . 



TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. Police Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3. Captain 



RECREATION 

Director/Youth Center Coordinator 

Clerk, Part-time 

Waterfront Director 

Swimming Instructor 

Lifeguard 

Playground Supervisor 

Recreation Specialist 

Recreation Leader 

Youth Center Supervisor 

Youth Center Leaders 



Personnel Board 



OTHER POSITIONS 

1. Building Inspector 

2. Electric Inspector 

3. Local Inspector . . 

4. Gas Inspector. . . . 



Proposed 



Proposed 
Salary 



$500 P.A. 
$360 EA. 



17 



Dog Officer 

Assistant Dog Officer 

Van Driver 

Sealer of Weights & Measures - 

Animal Inspector 

Clock Winder 
Town Engineer 



$2,000 P.A. 

SI, 000 P.A. 

$200 P.A. 



FOOTNOTES 

#1 — Represented by Collective Bargaining 

#2 -Not in "Job Rating Plan" 

#4 — Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

#5 — Salary will be 200% of the highest paid Union Firefighters established by State 

Law. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 32B Section 7A as amended, "Shall 
the Town in addition to the payment of sixty percent of 
a premium for contributory group life and health insurance 
for employees in the service of the town and their 
dependents, pay a subsidiary or additional rate?"; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to pay 90% 
or some lesser percentage of the premiums for contributory 
group life and health insurance for town employees; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of General Law Chapter 32 B Section 10 A 
authorizing any Town to provide dental benefits as part 
of group general or blanket insurance providing hospital, 
surgical, medical or other health insurance benefits for cer- 
tain persons in the service of the Town and their 
dependents; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of money as may be required to 
defray Town charges for the fiscal period from July 1, 1986 
to June 30, 1987; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipa- 
tion of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1 , 
1986; in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17 and 17 (a); or 
act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to request the 
Department of Revenue, Division of Accounts of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, to make an audit of all ac- 
counts in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion 
of the Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer and appropriate from available 
funds a certain sum of money with which to meet bills of 
previous years; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization Fund, 
transfer and appropriate from revenue sharing funds, 
and/or borrow a certain sum of money for the closure of 
the Swain Road landfill, said contracts to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Health; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Health 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer Commissioners 
to acquire any and all temporary and/or permanent 
easements, and any property in fee simple with the 
buildings and trees thereon by purchase, eminent domain, 
or otherwise, for the property indicated in the Town of 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further described and 
shown on a set of plans, entitled Plan of Sewer Easement 
in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, North Interceptor Sewer, 
prepared for the Chelmsford Sewer Commission, February, 
1986, scale 1 inch = 40 feet, by Howe surveying, and a plan 
entitled "Subdivision of Land in Chelmsford prepared for 
the Town of Chelmsford 1"=40' dated December 11, 1985, 
Prepared by William G. Troy", copies of which are on file 
in the office of the Town Engineer and are incorporated 
herewith, for the purpose of constructing and maintain- 
ing sewers, pumping stations, and all other appurtenances 
thereto and to see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
transfer and appropriate from the stabilization fund, 
transfer and appropriate revenue sharing funds and/or bor- 
row a certain sum of money to defray all necessary costs, 
fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition of said 
land and for paying any damages which may be awarded 
as the result of any such taking; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
Sewer Commissioners 



18 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
transfer and appropriate from the stabilization fund, 
transfer and appropriate from revenue sharing funds, 
and/or borrow a certain sum of money for capital im- 
provements throughout the Town and Capital Im- 
provements for the School Department as recommended 
at Town Meeting by the Capital Planning Committee; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $15,000.00 from the Sale of Graves and Lots 
to the Improvement and Development Fund of the 
Cemetery Department; or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend to 
the General By-Laws, Article VII Miscellaneous, by adding 
the following: Section II. Discharge of subsurface 
material and storage of fuels, substances, etc., within 
1200 feet of wells. 

1. Definitions 

In this By-Law, the following terms have the follow- 
ing meaning; 

(a) Subsurface material: any substance defined as 
(1) a Hazardous waste by any federal or state 
agency; by any Federal or State regulation, or 
pursuant to Article X of the Town of Chelmsford 
General By-Laws. (2) Septic wastes, whether or 
not pretreated, and (3) Industrial waste, (4) 
and/or any other material found to be hazardous 
and/or dangerous to the public health, welfare 
and safety and/or environment, by the Board of 
Health. 

(b) Discharge: The Discharge, deposit, injection, 
dumping, spilling, leaking, incineration, or plac- 
ing of substance materials below any surface. 

(c) Storage: The actual or intended containment of 
subsurface materials. 

2. No subsurface material shall be discharged or stored 
within 1200 feet of any wells located within the Town, 
if said wells supply the inhabitants of the Town with 
water, whether through an established Water District 
or municipal wells. 

3 . No fuels or subsurface material shall be stored within 
1200 feet of any wells located within the Town, if said 
wells supply the inhabitants of the Town with water, 
whether through an established Water District or 
Municipal Wells. 



4. Enforcement. 

The Board of Health or its Enforcement Officer may, 
according to law, enter upon any premises at any 
reasonable time to inspect for compliance with the 
provisions of this By-Law. Upon demand by the owner 
or person in control of the premises, however, the 
Board of Health or its Enforcement Officer shall ob- 
tain a warrant authorizing such entry and inspection. 
Information necessary to demonstrate compliance 
shall be submitted by the occupant of the premises 
at the request of the Board of Health or its Enforce- 
ment Officer. If requested, samples of subsurfaces 
materials and/or materials stored shall be provided 
to the Board of Health or its Enforcement Officer 
for testing. All records pertaining to said materials, 
disposal and removal shall be retained for no less than 
five years, and shall be made available for review 
within 48 hours of a request. 

5. Violation. 

Upon determination by the Board of Health of a 
violation of this By-Law, the Board may issue such 
order as it deems appropriate to remedy the viola- 
tion. The order may include a compliance schedule 
for those activities which the Board of Health deems 
reasonably necessary to abate the violation. 

6. The Planning Board, Board of Appeals and Building 
Inspector shall be prohibited from issuing any special 
permits variances or building permits in contraven- 
tion of this By-Law and any said permits shall be 
deemed null and void. 

7. Penalty. 

Violation of this By-Law shall be punishable by a fine 
of $300.00 for each offense. Each day that such viola- 
tion continues shall constitute a separate offense. 

8. Severability. 

It is hereby declared that the provisions of this by- 
Law are severable, and if any provisions of this By- 
Law shall be declared unlawful by a valid judgement 
or decree of any court of competent jurisdiction, such 
invalidity shall not affect any of the remaining pro- 
visions of this By-Law. 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
Board of Health 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of General Law, Chapter 44 Section 53E; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



19 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws, Article VII — Miscellaneous, by deleting 
Section 1. Dog Leash Law, and Section 8. Licensing of 
Dogs, by deleting said sections in their entirety, and 
substituting the following in their place. 

Section I. Regulation of Dogs 

1. REFERENCE TO MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL 
LAWS 

Any reference to a "Section number" in this By-Law 
shall mean Chapter 140 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, unless otherwise stated. 

2. DEFINITIONS 

Unless otherwise set out in this By-Law, any term 
defined in Section 136A, shall have the same mean- 
ing in this By-Law, and shall be expressly incor- 
porated herein. 

OWNER— Owner shall be intended to mean any per- 
son or persons, firm, association or corporation own- 
ing, keeping or harboring a dog owned or kept in 
the Town. 

AT LARGE— At Large shall be intended to mean off 
the premises of the owner, and not under the con- 
trol of the owner or authorized escort either by leash, 
cord, chain, or otherwise. 

LICENSE PERIOD -The license period shall be 
from January 1 of each year to December 31 of the 
same year. 

3. REGISTRATION AND LICENSES 

(a) A person who at the commencement of a license 
period is, or who during any license period be- 
comes, the owner or keeper of a dog three 
months old or over which is not duly licensed, 
and the owner or keeper of a dog three months 
old or over which is not duly licensed, and the 
owner or keeper of a dog when it becomes three 
months old during a license period, shall cause 
it to be registered, numbered, described and 
licensed until the end of such license period, and 
the owner or keeper of a dog so registered, num- 
bered, described and licensed during any license 
period, in order to own or keep such dog after 
the beginning of the succeeding license period, 
shall, before the beginning thereof, cause it to 
be registered, numbered, described and licens- 
ed for such period. The registering, numbering, 
describing and licensing of a dog shall be done 
in the office of the Town Clerk on a form pre- 
scribed and supplied by the Town Clerk, and 
shall be subject to the condition expressed 
therein that the dog which is subject of the 
license shall be controlled and restrained form 
killing, chasing or harassing live stock or fowls. 



The Town Clerk shall not grant such license for 
any dog unless the owner thereof provides the 
Town Clerk with either a veterinarian's certifica- 
tion that such dog has been vaccinated in accor- 
dance with the provisions of Section 145 B or has 
been certified exempt from such provision as 
outlined in Section 137 or 137A, or a notarized 
letter from a veterinarian that a certificate was 
issued or a metal rabies tag bearing an expira- 
tion date indicating that such certification is still 
in effect. 

The Owner or keeper of a licensed dog shall 
cause it to wear around its neck or body a collar 
or harness of leather or other suitable material, 
to which shall be securely attached a tag in a 
form prescribed by and issued by the Town Clerk 
when a license is issued. Such tag shall state the 
following: (a) Town of Chelmsford, (b) Year of 
issue, and (c) tag number. If any such tag shall 
be lost, the owner or keeper of such dog shall 
forthwith secure a substitute tag from the Town 
Clerk at a cost of one dollar. This section shall 
not apply where it is otherwise provided by law, 
nor shall it apply to a person having a kennel 
license. 

(b) The provisions of Section 138 and 138 A shall 
be expressly incorporated herewith shall hence- 
forth apply under this By-Law. 

(c) A license duly recorded shall be valid throughout 
the commonwealth, except that, in the case of 
the permanent moving of a dog into the town, 
the owner or keeper thereof shall, within thirty 
days after such moving, present the original 
license and tag of such dog to the Town Clerk 
and said Town Clerk shall take up the same and 
issue to said owner or keeper a transfer license, 
together with a tag, for such dog upon payment 
of one dollar. The provisions of this By-Law 
relative to the form and furnishing of licenses 
and tags shall apply to licenses and tags issued 
under this paragraph. 

4. KENNEL LICENSE 

(a) Any person maintaining a kennel shall have a 
kennel license. 

(b) Any person who meets any requirement of the 
Town of Chelmsford by- Laws, and Section 137A, 
may obtain a Kennel License from the Town 
Clerk on a form prescribed and supplied by the 
Town Clerk and for a fee as set out in Section 
5 of this By-Law. The Town Clerk shall upon ap- 
plication issue without charge a kennel license 
to any domestic charitable corporation incor- 
porated exclusively for the purpose of protecting 
animals from cruelty, neglect or abuse and for 
the relief of suffering among animals. 



20 



(c) The provisions of Section 138 and 138 A shall 
be expressly incorporated herewith shall hence- 
forth apply under this By-Law. 

(d) The Chief of Police or dog officer may at any 
time inspect or cause to be inspected any kennel 
and if, in their or his judgement, the same is not 
being maintained in a sanitary and humane 
manner, or if records are not properly kept as 
required by law, shall file with the Selectmen a 
petition setting forth the facts, and the Select- 
men shall upon this petition, or upon a petition 
of twenty-five citizens, setting forth that they are 
aggrieved, or annoyed to an unreasonable extent, 
by one or more dogs at a kennel maintained in 
town, because of excessive barking or vicious 
disposition of said dogs or other conditions con- 
nected with such kennel constituting a public 
nuisance, said Selectmen, within seven days after 
the filing of such petition, shall give notice to 
all parties in interest of a public hearing to be 
held within fourteen days after the date of such 
notice. Within seven days after such public hear- 
ing said Selectmen shall make an order either 
revoking or suspending such kennel license or 
otherwise regulating said kennel, or dismissing 
said petition. Within ten days after such order 
the holder of such license may bring a petition 
in the district court as outlined in Section 137C. 
Any person maintaining a kennel after the 
license therefor has been so revoked, or while 
such license is so suspended, shall be punished 
as set forth in section 18 of this By-Law. The 
Selectmen may in the case of any suspension, 
reinstate such license. 

(e) The provisions of Section 138 and 138 A shall 
be expressly incorporated herewith shall hence- 
forth apply under this By-Law. 

5. LICENSE FEES 

The fee for every dog licensed shall be as follows: 

Four Dollars ($4.00) or every neutered male 

dog. 
Four Dollars ($4.00) for every spayed female 

dog. 
Seven Dollars ($7.00) for every male and 

female dog. 

Determination of licensing eligibility, dogs not re- 
quired to be licensed, or refunding license fees, shall 
be determined as set out in Section 139. 

The fee for every kennel license shall be as follows: 

Ten Dollars ($10.00) for every kennel license 

for 4 dogs or less 
Twenty-five Dollars for every kennel license 

($25.00) for over 4 but not over 

10 dogs. 



Fifty Dollars ($50.00) 



for every kennel license 
for over 10 dogs. 



All the fees shall be increased by Five Dollars ($5.00) 
on the first day of the second month following the 
required licensing period, as outlined in section 3 (a) 
of this By-Law, and by an additional Five Dollars 
($5.00) on the first day of each succeeding month. 

6. DOG OFFICER 

The Board of Selectmen shall annually appoint a dog 
officer and as many assistant dog officers as said 
board determines necessary to enforce this By-Law 
and, said individual(s) shall enforce this By-Law and 
perform such other duties as the Selectmen may 
determine. The Selectmen shall determine hours and 
conditions of work for the dog officers. Compensa- 
tion for persons appointed under this By-Law shall 
be consistent with other By-Laws dealing with salaries 
of appointed officials. 

The provisions of Section 151 and 151A regarding kill- 
ing and or transfer of and dogs shall apply and are 
expressly incorporated in this By-Law. No dog officer 
shall be a licensed animal dealer registered with the 
United States Department of Agriculture, and no dog 
officer, either privately or in the course of carrying 
out his official assignments as an agent for this town, 
or shall any other agent of the town, give, sell, or turn 
over any animal which may come into his custody 
to any business or institution licensed or registered 
as a research facility or animal dealer with the United 
States Department of Agriculture whoever violates the 
provisions of this paragraph shall be punished as pro- 
vided in Section 151. 

7. LEASH LAW 

No owner or keeper of any dog shall permit such dog 
to run at large at anytime. The provisions of this sec- 
tion shall not be intended to apply to dogs par- 
ticipating in any dog show, nor to "seeing-eye' dogs 
properly trained to assist blind persons for the pur- 
pose of aiding them in going from place to place, nor 
to any dogs properly trained and under control of 
and aiding the deaf, nor to any dogs being trained 
or actually being used for hunting purposes. 

Nothing contained in the foregoing paragraph shall 
prevent the Selectmen from passing any orders 
authorized by Massachusetts General Laws or by Sec- 
tion 167 at such times as they shall deem it necessary 
to safeguard the public. 

Every owner or keeper of a dog shall exercise proper 
care and control of their dog so as to prevent said 
dog from becoming a public nuisance. It shall be 
deemed a public nuisance if any dog should trespass 
upon public or private property and deposit feces 
thereon, unless said feces are immediately removed 
by the owner or keeper of said dog. 



21 



8. CONFINEMENT ETC., OF DOGS 



11. DAMAGE CAUSED BY DOGS 



The dog officer shall seek out, catch and confine all 
dogs within the town that have not been licensed 
within 60 days of the time the dog is required to be 
licensed under this By-Law; and shall seek out, catch 
and confine any dogs within the town that are found 
on public property, or on private property where said 
dog is trespassing and the owner or person in con- 
trol of such property wants the dog removed, said 
dogs being in violation of this requirement of this By- 
Law; and shall seek out, catch and confine any dog 
within the town when said dog was cited for a viola- 
tion of any provision of this By-Law, and the owner 
or keeper has failed within 21 days to avail himself 
to Section 16 or 17 of this By-Law, or within 21 days 
of a determination by the court under the provisions 
of Article 1, Section 2 of the Town of Chelmsford 
General By-Laws that any sums are due, and has fail- 
ed to pay said sums. 

Any owner or keeper of any dog who refuses to turn 
over any dog to the dog officer upon demand, said 
seeking out, catching or confinement authorized in 
the paragraph above, shall be punished by a fine of 
One Hundred Dollars ($100). Each day that said 
violation continues shall constitute a separate offense. 

9. DISPOSITION OF DOGS 

Any dog confined by the dog officer, unless picked 
up by the owner, shall be kept for at least 10 days, at 
which time said dog may be disposed of in a manner 
determined by the Board of Selectmen, provided that 
at the end of 10 days, the dog officer may make avail- 
able for adoption any male or any spayed female dog 
not found to be diseased. Any dog confined by the 
dog officer shall not be released to the owner until 
the owner produces evidence of a current dog license, 
and pays a sum of $10 per day for care of the animal, 
each day or part of a day counted as one day. For 
any dog adopted under this paragraph, a fee of $10 
shall be charged, and said dog shall be licensed before 
adoption. Any fees in this paragraph are to be in ad- 
dition to fees or fines as specified elsewhere in this 
By-Law and/or under Massachusetts General Laws. 
No dog shall be turned over or sold in any manner 
inconsistent with Section 151 or disposed of inconsis- 
tent with the provision of 151 A. 

10. EMERGENCY TREATMENT 

Any veterinarian registered under the provisions of 
section fifty-five or fifty-six A of chapter one hun- 
dred and twelve who provides emergency treatment 
of a dog or cat that is injured on any public way in 
Chelmsford shall receive in lieu of payment from the 
county dog fund as allowed in Section 151 B, pay- 
ment from the Dog Fund provided by under this By- 
Law. All other provisions of Section 151 B shall be 
incorporated herein under this By-Law. 



Whoever suffers loss in a manner described in Sec- 
tion 161 shall inform the dog officer of such loss, who 
shall investigate the circumstances of said loss. In the 
event it is found that the damage was caused by a 
dog and the estimate of damages by the dog officer 
is less than $50, he shall submit a report to the Board 
of Selectmen. If the estimate is over $50, he shall have 
the damage appraised on oath, by three persons, one 
person appointed by the dog officer, one appointed 
by the person alleged to be damaged and one ap- 
pointed by the other two. Said appraisers shall act 
as outlined in Section 161 and turn in said appraisal 
to the Board of Selectmen who may authorize pay- 
ment, or make such independent investigation as they 
think proper, and shall issue an order upon the Town 
Treasurer for any amount as they decide to be just 
and shall notify all interested parties of their deci- 
sion. The appraisers shall receive payment from the 
town in a manner as is authorized in Section 161. All 
funds expended under this section shall come from 
the Dog Fund. 

The Selectmen may appoint a temporary investigator 
in any case that the board believes in its reasonable 
discretion requires further investigation, and if said 
investigator believes that the evidence is sufficient to 
sustain an action against the owner or keeper of the 
dog, he shall recommend to the Board of Selectmen 
that said action be brought, unless the owner or 
keeper before action brought pays him such amount 
in settlement of the damages as he deems reasonable. 
After the recommendation of the investigator, the 
Selectmen may order that action shall be brought in 
his own name or in the name of the Town of 
Chelmsford or both, as the Selectmen, determine. 

If the Selectmen determine, after notice to parties 
interested and a hearing, who is the owner or keeper 
of any dog which is found to have worried, maimed 
or killed any live stock or fowls, thereby causing 
damages for which their owner may become entitl- 
ed to compensation from the dog fund under this By- 
Law they shall serve upon the owner or keeper of such 
dog a notice directing him within twenty-four hours 
to kill or confine the dog. A person who owns or 
keeps a dog, and who has received such notice and 
does not within twenty-four hours kill such dog or 
thereafter keep it on his premises or under the im- 
mediate restraint and control of some person, shall 
be punished as provided in Section 18 of this By-Law, 
and any police officer, constable or dog officer may 
kill such dog if it is found outside of the enclosure 
of its owner or keeper and not under his immediate 
care. 

The Board of Selectmen, or their agents thereto 
authorized in writing, may, after written notice to the 
owner or keeper, enter upon the premises of the owner 
or keeper, of any dog known to them to have wor- 
ried or killed live stock or fowls, and then and there 
kill such dog, unless such owner or keeper whose 



22 



premises are thus entered for the said purpose shall 
give a bond in the sum of two hundred dollars, with 
sufficient sureties, approved by the Board of Select- 
men conditioned that the dog shall be restrained for 
twelve months next ensuing. And if the owner or 
keeper of the dog declares his intention to give such 
a bond, said Selectmen or their agents, shall allow 
him seven days, exclusive of Sundays and holidays, 
in which to procure and prepare the same and to pre- 
sent it to them, or to file it with the Town Clerk. 

12. LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES 

The owner or keeper of a dog which has done damage 
to live stock or fowls shall be liable in tort to the town 
for all damages so done in which the Town has been 
requested to pay as provided by General Laws 
Chapter 140 or by this By-Law. Such action may be 
brought by the Board of Selectmen, or by a tem- 
porary investigator as authorized in Section 11 of this 
By-Law. 

13. REWARDS 

The provisions of Sections 162 regarding the rewards 
for killing a dog shall be incorporated herewith with 
said funds being paid from the Dog Fund. 

14. ORDERING DOGS TO BE MUZZLED OR RE- 
STRAINED 

All the provisions of Section 167 shall be incorporated 
into this By-Law except that any dog held under the 
provisions of Section 167 may not be released until 
all the requirements of this By-Law, regarding licen- 
sing and the fee for care of the animal, are complied 
with. All other provisions of Section 167 shall be in- 
corporated herein. 

15. VIOLATIONS 

Any person authorized to enforce provisions of this 
By-Law shall in addition to any pickup of the dog 
pursuant to this By-Law, issue a citation to the owner 
or keeper of any dog violating the provisions of the 
Leash Law requirements of this By-Law. Any such 
citation shall include, in addition to the violation 
charged, the name and address of the owner or 
keeper of the dog, the date and time and location 
of the alleged offense, and the amount of the penal- 
ty due, said citation shall be on a form prescribed 
by the furnished by the Town Clerk. 

16. INFORMAL DISPOSITION PROCESS 

The owner or keeper of the dog that receives a cita- 
tion under this By-Law, may within 21 days, confess 
to the offense charged by personally or through a duly 
authorized agent or by mailing to the Town Clerk, 
said citation along with payment in the amount as 
authorized under the PENALTY provisions of this 
By-Law. Said payment shall be by postal note, money 



order or check. The payment to the Town Clerk shall 
operate as a final disposition of the case. 

If such person when issued a citation desires to con- 
test the violation through the Informal Disposition 
Process, he may, within 21 days of said issuance, re- 
quest a hearing with the Town Clerk, or a hearing 
officer appointed by said clerk, and may present 
either in person or by counsel, any evidence he may 
have to refute the allegation contained in the cita- 
tion. At such hearing, the clerk or hearing officer 
shall make a determination as to facts of the allega- 
tion, and said determination shall be final regarding 
the informal disposition process. 

17. NON CRIMINAL DISPOSITION OF VIOLATION 

If any person so notified by citation desires to con- 
test the violation alleged in the citation notice without 
availing themselves to the provisions of the informal 
process, or desires to contest the decision of the clerk 
or hearing officer, he may avail himself to the pro- 
cedures established in Article 1, Section 2 or the Town 
of Chelmsford General By-Laws. In either of the 
above cases, or if the owner or keeper of a dog fails 
to respond to the citation within 21 days, the Town 
Clerk shall forward a copy of the citation to the 
District Court where it shall be handled under the 
provisions of Article 1, Section 2 of the Town of 
Chelmsford General By-Laws. 

18. PENALTY 

(1) The following penalties, except where indicated 
herein shall be in effect for violations of the Leash 
Law provisions of this By-Law: 

(a) Informal Disposition Process 

1st Offense in calendar year f 25 

2nd Offense in calendar year $ 50 
3rd or Subsequent Offense in 

calendar year $100 

(b) Non Criminal Disposition through Article 
1, Section 2, Town of Chelmford General 
By-Laws. 

1st Offense in calendar year $ 50 

2nd Offense in calendar year $100 
3rd or Subsequent Offense in 

calendar year $150 

(2) Violation of Section 4, (d) of this By-Law shall 
be $50. 

(3) Penalties for violations of any other provision of 
this By-Law shall be $100. 

(4) Each day of all said violations shall constitute a 
separate offense. 



23 



19. DOG FUND 

There shall be a dog fund established by the town 
under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53 E of 
Massachusetts General Laws which shall be used to 
make purchases necessary to administer this By-Law 
and to pay any expenses relating to this By-Law or 
for any other costs that Massachusetts General Laws 
require to be paid from the county dog fund. Said 
fund shall be administered by the Town Accountant 
and may receive funds from usual municipal finan- 
cing methods and from any fees or fines collected 
under this By-Law. The Board of Selectmen shall 
determine a maximum amount that shall stay in said 
fund, with all additional funds being turned into the 
General Fund. 

The Board of Selectmen may determine certain 
salaries or expenses that may not be funded with this 
fund but must be appropriated through the usual 
municipal financing procedure, and such determina- 
tion shall be binding on this administration of this 
fund by the Town Accountant. 

20. ANTI-RABIC VACCINE AND TREATMENT 

The Board of Health shall, upon application furnish 
free of charge to any resident who has been exposed 
to rabies, or may have been so exposed, anti-rabic 
vaccine and anti-rabic treatment, in accordance with 
rules and regulations which the Department of Public 
Health is authorized to make. Any resident shall have 
the right to select his own physician, who shall be 
paid by the Town at a rate established by the Board 
of Health, and the fact that a physician is a member 
of the Board of Health shall not disqualify him from 
being so selected and from being paid by the town 
for his services. Reimbursement for the cost of fur- 
nishing vaccine and treatment, not exceeding fifty* 
dollars in the case of any one person, shall be made 
for the Dog Fund. 

21. DOG LISTINGS 

Persons authorized or directed by section four of 
chapter fifty-one or by any special law to make lists 
of persons three years of age or older shall make a 
list of all dogs owned by the inhabitants of the town 
at the time of making lists required under such sec- 
tion and return the same in duplicate to the Town 
Clerk on or before April first. An owner or keeper 
of a dog who refuses to answer or answers falsely to 
persons directed or authorized to make a list of the 
owners of dogs shall be punished by a fine of not less 
than ten dollars. 

22. MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL LAWS INCOR- 
PORATED INTO THIS BY-LAW 

The provisions of the following sections of Chapter 
140 of Massachusetts General Laws shall be incor- 
porated into and apply to this By-Law; Section 145B, 



149, 155, 155A, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161A, 168, 
174A, 174B, and 175D. 

23. EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION DATE OF THIS 
BY-LAW 

This By-Law shall go into effect on December 31, 
1986, and until said date, all areas of Massachusetts 
General Laws and Sections 1, and 8 Article VIII — 
Miscellaneous of the Town of Chelmsford General By- 
Laws shall remain in effect. 

24. SEVERABILITY CLAUSE 

If any part, section or provision of this By-Law is 
found to be invalid, the remainder of this By-Law 
shall not be affected thereby. 



Or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of General Law, Chapter 140 Section 147A 
authorizing the Town of Chelmsford to enact By-Laws and 
ordinances relative to the regulation of dogs; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization Fund, 
transfer and appropriate from revenue sharing funds, 
and/or borrow a certain sum of money for the purpose of 
completing Engineering Design and securing all necessary 
plans and specifications for implementation of Traffic 
Design at Summer Street and Boston Road, and further 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to complete all ap- 
plications and take all necessary steps to apply for Federal 
and State funds for the implementation of these plans and 
specifications; and further to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to enter any and all contracts for the implementa- 
tion of those plans and specifications, and for the 
expenditure of all Federal and State funds available to the 
Town for said implementation; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization Fund, 
transfer and appropriate from revenue sharing funds a cer- 
tain sum of money to pay for the Town of Chelmsford por- 
tion of the shared traffic engineer, as funded by E.O.C.D. 
multi-community grant; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer and appropriate from available 
funds a certain sum of money to the appropriate salary line 



24 



items to fund approved wage and salary increases and ex- 
pense allocations in departmental accounts to be recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen at the Annual Town 
Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds, the sum of 
$20,000, to be placed in a special fund as authorized under 
the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53C of the General 
Laws. Said funds to be used, along with all other monies 
received by the Town as compensation earned by it's 
employees from off-duty work details, in such manner and 
at such times as shall, in the discretion of the authority 
authorizing such off-duty work detail, compensate the 
employee for such service; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, to enter into compensating balance 
agreements, during fiscal 1987, as permitted by General 
Laws Chapter 41, Section 53F; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 



the General By-Laws Article VI — Police Regulations, Sec- 
tion 19 Prohibition on Leaving Motor Vehicles in Cer- 
tain Private Ways, by deleting paragraph #2 in its entirety, 
and substituting the following in its place: 

2. It shall be unlawful to obstruct or park a motor vehi- 
cle in any fire lane, such fire lane to be designated 
by the Board of Selectmen and shall be posted as 
such. Said fire lane to be NOT LESS THAN eigh- 
teen (18) Feet Wide for all buildings in any shopping 
center, bowling alley, theatre, nursing home, office 
building, or other public building. The establishment 
of fire lanes as set forth above shall be at the sole 
discretion of the Board of Selectmen and shall run 
from the wall of the building or any overhang of the 
building or any sidewalk adjacent thereto. Any fire 
lane in excess of eighteen (18) feet wide shall have 
the approval of the property owner or person in con- 
trol of such property; 

(a) The chief of the Fire Department shall notify all 
record owners of the designation of Fire Lanes. 



Or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
and appropriate a certain sum of money from the State 
Aid Funds, Additional Aid to Public Libraries, to the 
Board of Library Trustees, for the purpose of the enrich- 
ment of the Reference collections at the libraries; or act 
in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept Hart 
Road, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown 
by their reports and plans duly filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



Board of Public Library Trustees 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Library Trustees to expend the monies col- 
lected by the Library for lost books and other materials 
in order to replace lost materials; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Public Library Trustees 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
and appropriate a certain sum of money from the unex- 
pended proceeds of the School Capital Improvement Pro- 
ject Bond and/or note Issue, from Article 10 of the 1985 
Annual Town Meeting for the purpose of the rehabilita- 
tion of the roof at the Westlands School; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Capital Planning Committee 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 64G 
Section 3 A, authorizing the Town of Chelmsford to impose 
a local room occupancy excise at the rate of 4%; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to discon- 
tinue a portion of Russell Mill Road, as shown on a plan 
of land entitled, "Easement as built Plan of Land in 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts", prepared by Vanasse/Hangen 
Engineering, Inc., dated February 6, 1986, hereinafter 
referred to as the Plan, and to see if the Town will vote 
to accept the portion of Russell Mill Road, as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen and shown by their reports and 
said plan, duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and 
to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men, for consideration to be determined, to convey and 
transfer, all right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town 
in the above parcel of the land located on the discontinued 
portion of Russell Mill Road, to the abutters of said pro- 
perty; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to purchase or take by eminent 
domain, access easement over a parcel of land described 
below and owned by New England Power Company; and 
further to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, or borrow a sum of money for appraisal fees, 
engineering fees, land acquisition costs and related ex- 
penses; the said land is described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the Northerly side of said 



25 



Pine Street at the Southeasterly corner of the granted 
premises and at land now or formerly of Henry E. 
and Mary T. Sherman; thence running S 83° 30' 35" 
W seventy (70) feet to a point; thence N 07° 16' 10" 
E eighty (80) feet to a point being the Northwest cor- 
ner of said parcel; thence S 82° 43' 50" E ninety-six 
and eighty one hundreths (96.80) feet to a point; 
thence S 31° 30' 55" W sixty-nine and ninety-one hun- 
dredths (69.91) feet to the point of beginning of 
herein described parcel of land, containing 5,809 
+ /— square feet of land; 

Said parcel of land, a portion which lies in the Town 
of Chelmsford and the remainder lying in the Town of 
Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts: 

Said parcel is a portion of land shown as Parcel #3 con- 
taining 3.03 acres as shown on Plan of Land for New 
England Power Company which plan is recorded in said 
Registry of Deeds in Book of Plans 119, Plan 152; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey and transfer all right, title and interest, if 
any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of land located 
at 25 4th Avenue in Chelmsford and shown as lots 62 and 
63 on Assessors Map 66; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey and transfer all right, title, and interest, if 
any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of land located 
at 9 Alcorn Road, and being the premises taken by the 
Town of Chelmsford by an instrument of taking dated May 
3, 1979 and recorded in Middlesex North District Registry 
of Deeds in Book 2364, Page 135, containing approximately 
1.3 acres of land, more or less; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Law and accompanying Zoning Map refer- 
red to therein to change from Single Residence (RB) to 
Multiple Residence District (RM), the following described 
land owned by Robert M. Hicks, Inc., Lennart W. Leed- 
berg, Jr., Pauline R. Leedberg, Frederick Abrahamson, 
Gerald G. Abrahamson, Robert M. Abrahamson, Carlene 
M. Dillon, Donald E. Smith, Harriet P. Smith, Dorothy 
M. Johnson, Whitey Morris, Gloria G. Morris, Thomas W. 
Sugden, Glendyse E. Sugden: 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massachu- 
setts, situated on the Northeasterly side of Scotty Hollow 
Drive, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled Sketch 
Plan of Land for Robert M. Hicks, Scale 1 ft. =100 ft. dated 
January 5, 1985," being bounded and described as follows: 



NORTHWESTERLY 



NORTHERLY 



SOUTHEASTERLY 



NORTHEASTERLY 



NORTHWESTERLY 



NORTHEASTERLY 



NORTHWESTERLY 



by Scotty Hollow Drive and land 
now or formerly of Robert M. 
Hicks, Inc., 1,234.72 feet; 

by land of the Town of Chelmsford 
by three courses, 151.77 feet, 206 
feet and 102 feet; 

By land of Town of Chelmsford 
253'+; 

Again by land of Town of Chelms- 
ford 39'+; 

Again by land of Town of Chelms- 
ford 32'+; 

By land of Town of Chelmsford by 
4 courses 90" + , 41'+ , 206'+ , 38' + 

By land of the Town of Chelmsford 
by two courses 97.02 feet and 165 
feet 



NORTHERLY 

NORTHWESTERLY 

NORTHEASTERLY 

EASTERLY 

NORTHERLY 
EASTERLY 

SOUTHERLY 

EASTERLY 

SOUTHERLY 

NORTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHEASTERLY 
NORTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHWESTERLY 



Again by the land of the Town of 
Chelmsford by three courses 64.02 
feet+, 190.75 feet+ and 123.42 
feet+; 

Again by the land of the Town of 
Chelmsford, 202.62 feet+; 

by land of the Lowell Sportsmen 
Club, 302.75 feet + ; 

by land of Toffanelli, 217 feet + , 
and by land of Hulick 145 feet + ; 

by land of Hulick 100 feet+; 

by land of McAllister, Richall and 
Thursby, 285.00 feet; 

by land of Murphy, 100 feet; 

by land of Murphy, 50 feet; 

by land of Grant, McLaughlin, 
Williams, May, and Cianci, 620 
feet+; 

by land of Cianci, 376.57 feet + ; 

by land of Morris, 140 feet + ; 

by land of Morris, 114.28 feet+; 

by land of Johnson, 140 feet; 

by land of Smith, 114.28 feet; 



26 



SOUTHEASTERLY by land of Smith, 120.00 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land of Smith, 100 feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by land of Abrahamson, 100 feet; 

SOUTHWESTERLY by land of Abrahamson, 100 feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by land of Abrahamson and Leed- 
berg, 200 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land of Leedberg, 133.33 feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by land of Hicks, 150 feet. 

Containing, according to said plan approximately 
31.8 acres of land; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Law and accompanying Zoning Map refer- 
red to therein to change from single residence (RB) to 
General Commercial District (CD), the following describ- 
ed parcels of land owned by Bertha Sadowski: 

The land in Chelmsford, situated on the Northeasterly 
side of Fairview Street, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a stone bound at the Northwesterly cor- 
ner of the premises; thence running North 55° 14' 
17" East by land of Harold and Dora Tucke, ninety- 
seven and 04/100 (97.04) feet to a stake in the ground; 
thence running South 29° 45' 28" East still by said 
Tucke land sixty-six and 34/100 (66.34) feet to a stone 
bound in the corner; thence running North 49° 12' 
52" East still by said Tucke land three hundred ninety- 
nine and 26/100 (399.26) feet to a stone bound at 
land of the County of Middlesex; thence running 
South 31° 29' 46" East still by said land of the Coun- 
ty of Middlesex one hundred twenty (120) feet to a 
concrete bound; thence running South 49° 17' 12" 
West by other land now or formerly of Fallon, five 
hundred fifteen and 90/100 (515.90) feet to a con- 
crete bound at said Fairview Street; thence running 
North 25° 39' 25" West by Fairview Street two hun- 
dred (200) feet to the point of beginning. 

Containing one and 55/100 (1.55) acres and being 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Chelms- 
ford belonging to Gertrude M. Fallon, surveyed 3 
December 1982, Richard L. McGlinchey", which plan 
is recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds in Plan Book 98, Plan No. 28B. 

Meaning and intending to describe all the property 
conveyed to Joseph Sadowski and Bertha E. Sadowski 
by deed recorded in Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Book 1593, Page 318. 

Also the land situated on the Northeasterly side of 
Fairview Street and the Northeasterly side of North 
Road, bounded and described as follows: 



Beginning at a concrete bound in the ground at the 
Northwesterly corner of the granted premises at the 
Southwesterly corner of the other premises of 
Sadowski, being shown on a plan of land entitled 
"Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass., belonging to 
Gertrude M. Fallon, surveyed 3 December 1982, 
Richard L. McGlinchey, Registered Surveyor", which 
plan is recorded with Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 98, Plan No. 28B; 
thence running Southeasterly by Fairview Street sixty- 
one and 60/100 (61.60) feet to a Massachusetts 
highway bound; thence running Southerly still by 
Fairview Street, one hundred forty and 79/100 
(140.79) feet to a Massachusetts highway bound at 
the intersection of Fairview Street and North Road; 
thence running Southeasterly by North Road, one 
hundred sixty-eight 79/100 (168.79) feet to a stone 
bound at the Northwesterly corner of premises of 
Elmer G. Crowell and Pauline G. Crowell, being 
shown on a plan of land entitled "Plan of Land in 
Chelmsford, Mass. belonging to Gertrude M. Fallon, 
surveyed 13 May, 1961, Richard L. McGlinchey, 
Registered Surveyor", which plan is recorded with said 
Registry of Deeds, Book of Plans 94, Plan 135B; 
thence running North 57° 02' 50" East by said Crowell 
land, two hundred eighteen and 72/100 (218.72) feet 
to an iron pipe in the ground; thence running South 
42° 24' 08" East still by said Crowell land, two hun- 
dred (200) feet to an iron pipe at ditch and land of 
the County of Middlesex; thence running North- 
easterly by said land of the County of Middlesex by 
two courses two hundred ninety-seven and 03/100 
(297.03) feet to a stone bound in the corner of the 
wall at other land of the County of Middlesex; thence 
running Northwesterly by other land of the County 
of Middlesex six hundred ten and 85/100 (610.85) feet 
to a concrete bound at said other land of the grantees; 
thence running Southwesterly by said other land of 
the grantees, five hundred fifteen and 90/100 (515.90) 
feet to the point of beginning. 

Containing five and 8/10 (5.8) acres, more or less. 

Meaning and intending to describe all of the property 
conveyed to Joseph Sadowski and Bertha E. Sadowski 
by deed recorded in Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Book 1693, Page 129; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple, by pur- 
chase, by eminent domain or otherwise, the property with 
the buildings and trees thereon beginning at the most 
northwesterly corner of the parcel at the intersection of the 
lot line and the Lowell-Chelmsford boundary line, run- 
ning along said lot line south 13° 46' 36" west two hundred 
eight and 35/100 (208.35') feet: 

Thence south 88° 55' 09" east one hundred fifty and 
63/100 (150.63') feet; 



27 



Thence south 20° 58' 00" west seven hundred seven- 
teen and 78/100 (717.78') feet; 



Thence south 
(20.04') feet; 



14' 00" west twenty and 04/100 



Thence south 36° 27' 11" east six hundred thirty-one 
and 55/100 (631.55') feet; 

Thence south 21° 01' 25" east eighty-nine and 22/100 
(89.22) feet; 

Thence easterly along the boundary of U.S. Route 
3 on a curved line having a radius of 4,750 feet and 
a length of 1,198.44 feet thence north 84° 04' 50" east 
122.82 feet to the intersection with the westerly boun- 
dary of Steadman Street; 

Thence north along the westerly boundary of Stead- 
man Street on a curved line having a radius of 371.70 
feet and a length of 132.41 feet thence north 06° 49' 
50" west a distance of 490.88 feet to a point thence 
still along said road north 10° 37' 52" west 37.26 feet 
to the Lowell-Chelmsford boundary; 

Thence north 62° 10' 58" west one thousand eight 
hundred eighty-one and 77/100 (1,881.77) feet to the 
point of beginning, containing approximately 38.00 
acres, and further shown as a Parcel of land on a cer- 
tain plan on file with the Town Clerk and the Town 
Engineer, entitled Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass- 
achusetts, Scale 1" = 40', February 22, 1986, by Howe 
Surveying Associates, for the purpose of securing ade- 
quate municipal trash disposal, and to see if the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer and ap- 
propriate from available funds, transfer and ap- 
propriate from the Stabilization Fund, transfer and 
appropriate from revenue sharing funds, and/or bor- 
row a certain sum of money to defray all necessary 
costs, fees and expenses in connection with the ac- 
quisition of said land and for paying any damages 
which may be awarded as the result of any such tak- 
ing; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds 
transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization Fund, 
transfer and appropriate from revenue sharing funds, 
and/or borrow a certain sum of money for the purpose of 
completing Architectural Design and securing all necessary 
plans and specification for the construction and/or 
reconstruction of the front portion of the fire station located 
on North Road, and to see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available 
funds, transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization 
Fund, transfer and appropriate from revenue sharing 
funds, and/or borrow a certain sum of money to perform 
all construction and/or reconstruction in conformity with 
said plans all said contracts to be made under the supervi- 



sion of the Chief of the Fire Department; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Fire Department 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article II— -Town Meeting, by deleting 
Section 5 Finance Committee, in its entirety and 
substituting the following in its place. 

Section 5 Finance Committee 

1. The Finance Committee in the Town of Chelmsford 
shall be composed of seven members to be elected 
at the Annual Town Election. 

2. The election of said members shall be as follows: 

(a) All current member shall continue to serve un- 
til June 30, 1987, at which time all said positions 
shall be abolished. 

(b) All positions shall be elected in the Town of 
Chelmsford 1987 Annual Town election to take 
office on July 1, 1987. 

(c) The initial positions on said Committee shall be 
elected as follows: 

(1) Two positions for a period of three (3) years 
each; 

(2) Three positions for a period of two (2) years 
each; 

(3) Two positions for a period of one (1) year 
each. 

(d) Each of the positions shall be subject to election 
at the end of the above terms as stated in sub- 
section (C); and, thereafter each position shall 
have a term of three (3) years. 

(e) The moderator shall have the power to make in- 
term appointments to said Finance Committee 
when an elected and/or appointment become va- 
cant. Said interna appointment shall serve until 
the next Annual Town election, at which point, 
the position for the balance of the term of said 
position shall be subject to election. 

3. Copies of the Finance Committee report, including 
the Warrant for each Annual Town Meeting shall be 
made available by the Finance Committee to regis- 
tered voters of record not less than two weeks prior 
to the meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey and transfer all right, title, and interest, if 



28 



any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of land located 
at 283 Riverneck Road and being the premises taken by 
the Town of Chelmsford by an instrument of taking, dated 
July 29, 1977 and recorded in the Middlesex North Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds in Book 2260, Page 274, contain- 
ing approximately 24,675 square feet of land, more or less; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey and transfer all right, title, and interests, if 
any, held by the Town, in a certain parcel of land on 
Wightman Street, shown as Lot 14, Blk 10 on Assessors' 
Plat 19 and being the premises taken by the Town of 
Chelmsford by an instrument of taking, dated May 3, 1979 
and recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
in Book 2364, Page 152, containing approximately 5,000 
square feet, more or less, of land; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Board of Assessors to issue a certain amount of money 
from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
tax rate; or act in relation thereto. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS 



MARCH 26, 1986 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: The New Town Office Building Gym; North Con- 
gregational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room; East 
Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; North Congregational Church Hall; 
McCarthy Junior High School; Small Gymnasium; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; McCarthy Junior High 
School, Small Gymnasium; seven days at least before the 
time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



Finance Committee 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. Given 
unto our hands this 24th day of March, A.D. 1986. 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren 

Paul C. Hart 



29 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
April 5, 1986 



indicates candidate for re-election 



SELECTMAN (2) 3 Yrs. 
Jeffrey W. Stallard 
August C. Mueller 
Dennis J. Ready* 
Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Donald L. Elias 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 

22 41 51 11 29 23 42 17 17 32 15 19 319 

34 25 22 64 34 29 13 21 18 27 27 22 336 

161 174 135 231 203 225 2406 

184 173 112 221 219 179 2263 

68 126 100 218 120 163 1520 

3 

68 75 62 123 84 84 959 

536 586 444 852 668 692 7806 



268 


156 


206 


103 


326 


259 


148 


206 


82 


249 



ASSESSOR 3 Yrs. 

Ruth K. Delaney* 
Blanks 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 3 Yrs. 

Gerald L. Hardy* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 5 Yrs. 

William P. Keohane* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



334 


191 


289 


145 


353 


280 


216 


220 


165 


297 


269 


266 


3025 


90 


54 


69 


35 


105 


69 


52 


73 


57 


129 


65 


80 


878 


424 


245 


358 


180 


458 


349 


268 


293 


222 


426 


334 


346 


3903 


324 


188 


283 


141 


356 


275 


210 


220 


158 


283 


273 


263 


2974 


100 


57 


75 


39 


102 


74 


58 


73 


64 


143 


61 


83 


929 


424 


245 


358 


180 


458 


349 


268 


293 


222 


426 


334 


346 


3903 


308 


190 


278 


138 


338 


274 


211 


209 


154 


271 


256 


243 


2870 


116 


55 


80 


42 


120 


75 


57 


84 


68 


155 


78 


103 


1033 


424 


245 


358 


180 


458 


349 


268 


293 


222 


426 


334 


346 


3903 



BOARD OF HEALTH 3 Yrs. 

Mark W. Gauthier 

Paul J. Canniff* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

PARK COMMISSIONER 3 Yrs. 

Eileen M. Duffy* 

Blanks 



CONSTABLE 3 Yrs. 

William E. Spence* 
Blanks 



225 
68 
293 



120 


1653 


203 


1948 


23 


302 


346 


3903 


264 


2958 


82 


945 


346 


3903 


265 


2914 


81 


989 



SEWER COMMISSIONER 3 Yrs. 

John P. Emerson. Jr.* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

TRUSTEE OF PUBLIC LIBRARY (2) 3 Yrs. 

Janet B. Hendl* 

Brenda M. McDermott* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



260 


151 


246 


298 


164 


263 


290 


175 


207 



263 


203 


196 


164 


283 


261 


261 


2896 


86 


65 


97 


58 


143 


73 


85 


1007 


349 


268 


293 


222 


426 


334 


246 


3903 


244 


177 


176 


113 


240 


208 


226 


2436 


250 


190 


203 


137 


265 


233 


247 


2692 


204 


169 


207 


194 


347 


227 


219 


2678 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2) 3 Yrs. 

James Brough* 

Carl A. Olsson* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



254 
303 



227 
263 
226 



279 
325 



280 
203 
698 



209 
208 
586 



232 
273 
347 



211 2311 

257 2812 
224 2683 



PLANNING BOARD (2) 3 Yrs. 

Ann H. McCarthy* 
Jacob P. Sartz III 
Peter E. Bagni 
Jonathan C. Stubbs 
George Kalogeropoulos 
John F. McCarthy* 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



1944 
706 
910 
366 
733 
1917 
1230 



30 



WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 12, 1986 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School 
Gymnasium on Monday evening, the twelfth (12) day of 
May, 1986, at 8:00 o'clock P.M., then and there to act upon 
the following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Conservation Commission to engage engineers, ap- 
praisers, attorneys and other necessary consultants for the 
purpose of preparing all documentation required for the 
acquisition, by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, 
for the property located in the Town of Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, and further described and shown on a plan 
entitled, "Compiled Plan of land in the Town of 
Chelmsford" prepared by James E. Pearson, P.E., 
Chelmsford Town Engineer, April 23, 1986. Scale 1" = 100, 
a copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Engineer 
and is incorporated herewith, with all said contracts to be 
made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and 
to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 
and appropriate from available funds, transfer and ap- 
propriate for the Stabilization Fund, transfer and ap- 
propriate from the Conservation Fund, transfer and 
appropriate revenue sharing funds, borrow, and/or 
authorize the Selectmen to expend from the Conservation 
Trust Fund, a certain sum of money to defray all necessary 
costs, fees, and expenses; or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, to acquire in fee simple, by pur- 
chase, by eminent domain, or otherwise, the property 
located in the Town of Chelmsford and further described 
and shown on a plan entitled, "Compiled Plan of land in 
the Town of Chelmsford" prepared by, April 23, 1986, scale 
1" = 100' by James E. Pearson, P.E., Chelmsford Town 
Engineer, copy of which is on file in the office of the Town 
Engineer and is incorporated herewith, for the purpose of 
maintaining conservation and open space, land within the 
Town of Chelmsford with said land being held, managed 
and controlled by the Conservation Commission for the 
promotion and development of the land for the above pur- 
poses, and further, to see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Conservation Commission to enter into a contractual 
self-help agreement with the office of Environmental Af- 
fairs, to defray all necessary costs, fees, and expenses in con- 
nection with the acquisition of said land and for paying 
any damages which may be awarded as a result of any such 



taking, and further, to see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available 
funds, transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization 
Fund, transfer and appropriate from the Conservation 
Fund, transfer and appropriate revenue sharing funds, bor- 
row and/or authorize the Selectmen to expend from the 
Conservation Trust Fund, a certain sum of money to defray 
all necessary costs, fees, and expenses in connection with 
the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages 
which may be awarded as the result of any such taking; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law of the Town of Chelmsford as follows: 

1. Amend Article I— Administration and Procedure, 
Section 1200 Administration, by adding the follow- 
ing subsection 1250: 

1250. Application Procedure: Special Permits or 
Variances 

An application to the Board of Appeals or Plan- 
ning Board for a special permit or variance may 
be made by any person desiring such action by fil- 
ing with the appropriate Board the prescribed ap- 
plication which shall describe the request and 
contain such information as may be required by this 
By-Law and accompanied at the time of filing by 
a plot plan drawn to scale showing the location of 
all lot and street lines, existing and proposed struc- 
tures utilities, wells, sewage disposal systems of the 
property which is the subject of the appeal or ap- 
plication. All applications shall be accompanied by 
a plat map showing lot and street lines and approx- 
imate location of structures on premises adjacent 
to the property which is the subject of the ap- 
plication. 

2. Amend Article I —Administration and procedure, 
Section 1300 Board of Appeals, by deleting subsec- 
tion 1322, in its entirety, and substituting the follow- 
ing in its place: 

1322. To hear and decide appeals or petitions for 
variances from the terms of this By-Law with respect 
to particular land or structures. Such variance shall 
be granted only in cases where the Board of Ap- 
peals finds all of the following: 

(a) A literal enforcement of the provisions of this 
By-Law would involve a substantial hardship 
to the petitioner or appellant. 

(b) The hardship is owing to circumstances relating 
to the soil conditions, shape or topography of 
such land or structures and especially affecting 
such land or structures but not effecting 
generally the zoning district in which it is 
located. 



31 



(c) Desirable relief may be granted without either: 

(1) substantial detriment to the public good; 
or 

(2) nullifying or substantially derogating from 
the intent or purpose of this By-Law. 

(d) The Board shall determine the conformance of 
any application for a variance with the Master 
Plan and shall consider the effect of the 
variance on the future development of the 
Town. 

(e) Under no circumstances shall the Board grant 
a variance to allow a use not permitted under 
the terms of this ordinance in the district in- 
volved. 

Amend Article I —Administration and Procedure, by 
deleting subparagraph (b) of subsection 1424. Ap- 
plication for Special Permit and Site Plan, in its 

entirety and substituting the following subparagraph 
(b) in its place: 

(b) The contents of the site plan are as follows: 

(1) Four separate plans prepared at a scale of one 
inch equals 20 feet or such other scale as may 
be approved by the Planning Board. The four 
plans are as follows: 

(a) Site layout which shall contain the boun- 
daries of the lot(s) in the proposed develop- 
ment, proposed structures, drives, parking, 
landscaping, screening, fences, walls, walks, 
outdoor lighting, and loading facilities. 

(b) Topography and Drainage Plan which shall 
contain the existing and proposed final 
topography at two foot intervals and plans for 
handling stormwater drainge. 

(c) Utility and Landscaping Plan which shall 
include all facilities for refuse and sewerage 
disposal or storage of all wastes, the location 
of all hydrants, fire alarm and fire fighting 
facilities on and adjacent to the site, all pro- 
posed recreational facilities and open space 
areas, and all wetlands including flood plain 



(d) Architectural Plan which shall include the 
ground floor plan and architectural elevations 
of all proposed buildings. 

(2) A landscaping plan at the same scale as the site 
plan, showing the limits of work, existing tree lines, 
and all proposed landscape features and im- 
provements including planting areas with size and 
type of stock for each shrub or tree. 



scale as the site plan, showing the entire project and 
its relation to existing areas, building and roads for 
a distance of feet from the project boundaries. 

(4) A locus plan at a scale of one inch equals 100 feet 
(1" equals 100'), showing the entire project and its 
relation to existing the entire project and its rela- 
tion to existing areas, buildings and roads for a 
distance of 1,000 feet from the project boundaries 
or such other distance as may be approved or re- 
quired by the Planning Board. 

4. Amend Article I —Administration and Procedure, 
subsection 1424. Application for Special Permit and 
Site Plan, by adding the following subparagraph (i): 

(i) Topography shall be prepared by using actual 
elevations of the Town of Chelmsford's Topographic 
Maps, 1976. 

5. Amendment Article I —Administration and Pro- 
cedure, Section 1420 Site Plan Review, by adding 
the following subsection: 

1428. Any easement, covenant or agreement that is re- 
quired as a result of the site plan review shall be 
recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

6. Amend Article II — District Regulations, by deleting 
Section 2100. Establishment of Districts, in its en- 
tirety, and substituting the following in its place. 

2100. Establishment of Districts 

For the purpose of this By-Law, the Town of 
Chelmsford is hereby divided into the following 
types of districts: 

RA — Residential A District These are single family 
residence districts which are adjacent to well sites 
or are environmentally sensitive because of the water 
table and wetlands. These areas are not slated for 
sewers anytime in the near future and need to be 
protected. These areas should not be intensively 
developed. 

RB — Residential B District These are low densi- 
ty single family residential areas in which some 
utilities are lacking. These areas comprise a major 
type of residential development in the Town. 

RC — Residential C District These are medium 
density general residence districts which serve as 
transition zones within the Town. 

RM — Residential Multi-Family District These are 
high density residential districts. 

CA — Neighborhood Commercial District These 
are commercial districts for neighborhood areas. 



(3) An Isometric line drawing (projection) at the same 



CB — Roadside Commercial District These are 



32 



general commercial districts which are high traffic 
generators. Included are such uses as automotive 
repair, open lot sales, wholesale business, storage 
and so on. 

CC — Shopping Center District These are commer- 
cial districts designed to allow the clustering of 
stores, offices and so on around a central parking 
area. These are high traffic generators usually 
located on major roads. 

CD — General Commercial District These are 
primarily retail commercial offices, restaurants and 
entertainment commercial uses excluding repair, 
open lot sales, wholesale and storage uses. These 
uses are usually located along existing major traf- 
fic thoroughfares. 

CX — Adult Entertainment Districts These are 
commercial districts created for adult entertain- 
ment establishments and other permitted uses as 
defined by this By-Law. 

IA — Limited Industrial District These are areas 
that are primarily used for research development, 
manufacturing and warehousing with the necessary 
office space. 

IS — Special Industrial District These districts are 
open to all industrial uses but are suited for heavy 
industrial and storage. 

P — Public District These are lands owned or leas- 
ed by federal, state or municipal governments for 
governmental purposes. 

OS — Open Space District These are privately own- 
ed lands dedicated to recreational uses. 

RMH — Residential Mobile Home District These 
are districts created in accordance with the provi- 
sions of this ordinance. 

7. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2100. Establishment of District, by adding the 
following subsections 2110. Official Zoning Map, 
and, 2120. Rules for Interpretation of Zoning 
District Boundaries: 

2110. Official Zoning Map. The Town is hereby divided 
into Zoning "Districts also referred to as Zones as 
shown on the Official Zoning Map, which together 
with all explanatory material, thereon, is hereby 
adopted by reference and declared to be part of this 
By-Law. The Official Zoning Map shall be iden- 
tified by the signature of the Chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen, and attested by the Town Clerk bear- 
ing the Seal of the Town. The Official Zoning Map 
is included as originally dated May, 1963 and as 
most recently amended. 



2120. Rules for Interpretation of Zoning District Boun- 
daries. Where uncertainties exist as to the boun- 
daries of districts as shown on the official zoning 
maps the following shall apply: 

(a) where the boundary lines as shown upon said 
map as approximately following the street lines 
of public and private ways or railways, the 
centerlines of such ways shall be the boundary 
lines. 

(b) where the boundary lines are shown approx- 
imately on the location of property lot lines, 
and the exact location of property, lot or boun- 
dary lines is not indicated by means of dimen- 
sions shown in figures, then the property or lot 
lines shall be the boundary lines. 

(c) boundary lines located outside of street lines 
and shown approximately parallel thereto shall 
be regarded as parallel to such street lines, and 
dimensions shown in figures places upon said 
map between such boundary lines and street 
lines are the distance in feet of such boundary 
lines from such street lines; such distances be- 
ing measured at right angles to such street lines 
unless otherwise indicated. 

(d) in all cases which are not covered by other pro- 
visions of this section, the location of boundary 
lines shall be determined by the distance in feet, 
in given, from other lines upon said map, by 
the use of identifications as shown on the map, 
or by the scale of the map. 

(e) where the district boundary lines follows a 
stream, lake or other body of water, said boun- 
dary line shall be constructed to be at the 
thread or channel of the stream; or at the limit 
of the jurisdiction of the Town of Chelmsford, 
unless otherwise indicated. 

(f) where a district boundary line divides any lot 
existing at the time such line is adopted, the 
regulations of any district in which the lot has 
frontage on a street may be extended by special 
permit from the Board of Appeals not more 
than thirty feet into the other district. 

(g) where physical or cultural features existing on 
the ground are at variance with those shown 
on the official map, or in other circumstances 
not covered by the above subsections, the Board 
of Appeals shall interpret the district boun- 
daries. 

8. Amend II — District Regulations, by deleting Section 
2300 Use Regulations Schedule, in its entirety, and 
substituting the following in its place: 

See Attachment 



33 



9. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2400. Nonconforming Uses, by deleting subsection 
2440. Restoration, in its entirety, and substituting 
the following in its place. 

2400. Restoration or Rehabilitation. No non- 
conforming structure, other than a single or two- 
family dwelling, damaged by fire, storm or other 
accidental causes to the extent of more than 
seventy-five percent of its replacement value or to 
the extent of being dismantled more than seventy- 
five percent for rehabilitation purposes shall be 
repaired or rehabilitated except in "conformity with 
this By-Law, and provided further that such restor- 
ing shall be completed within two years after such 
catastrophe. 

10. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2500 Intensity of Use Regulations, by deleting 
subsection 2520. Lot change in its entirety and 
substituting the following in its place. 

2520. Lot Change. No lot shall be created, nor shall an 
existing lot be changed in size or shape except 
through a public land taking or donation for road 
widening, drainage, utility improvements or except 
where otherwise permitted herein, so as to increase 
the degree of non-conformity that presently exists. 

11. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2500. Intensity of Use Regulations, by deleting 
subsection 2530. Isolated Lots, in its entirety and 
substituting the following in its place. 

2530. Isolated Lots. Any increase in lot areas, width, 
depth, frontage, yard or coverage requirements of 
this By-Law shall not apply to erection, extension, 
alteration, or moving of a structure on a legally 
created lot not meeting current requirements pro- 
vided that the applicant documents that, 

(a) At the time such increased lot requirements 
became applicable to it, the lot: 

(1) had at least 5,000 sq. ft. of lot area and 
50 feet of frontage on a street; and 

(2) was held in ownership separate from all 
other lots having frontage within 1,000 
feet; and 

(3) conformed to then existing dimensional re- 
quirements; and 

(b) the lot is to be used for single-family or non- 
residential use. 

Such non- conforming lots may be changed in size 
or shape or their land area recombined without los- 
ing this exemption, so long as the change does not 
increase the actual or potential number of building 
lots. 



12. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2500. Intensity of Use Regulations, by deleting 
subsection 2540. Accessory Buildings, in its entire- 
ty and substituting the following in its place. 

2540. Accessory Buildings. No accessory building or 
structure except a permitted sign or roadside stand, 
shall be located within a required front yard area. 
A detached accessory building may be located in 
the rear yard areas and on the same lot as a prin- 
cipal building, provided that not more than 
twenty-five percent of the required yard area shall 
be so occupied, and further provided that an ac- 
cessory building shall not be located nearer than 
ten feet from the principal building and at least 
ten feet from the side or rear lot line. An accessory 
building attached to its principal building or within 
ten feet of it shall be considered an integral part 
thereof and as such shall be subject to the front, 
side, and rear yard requirements applicable to the 
principal building. 

13. Amend Article II — District Regulation, Section 
2500. Intensity of Use Regulations, by deleting 
subsection 2550. Erection of more than one prin- 
cipal building on a lot, in its entirety and 
substituting the following in its place. 

2550. Erection of More Than One Principal Building 
on a Lot. No more than one principal residential 
building shall be permitted on a lot except in the 
case of motels, hotels, mobile home parks and 
multi-family structures which shall be reviewed by 
the Planning Board in accordance with Section 
1420 — (Replace) Site Plan Review. In any com- 
mercial or industrial district, more than one prin- 
cipal building or structure may be erected or 
moved onto a lot provided that area, frontage, lot 
coverage and yard requirements can be met as 
though each structure were located on an in- 
dividual lot, and provided that the plans therefore 
are reviewed by the Planning Board in accordance 
with Section 1420. 

14. Amend Article II — District Regulations, by deleting 
Section 2600. Intensity of Use Schedule in its en- 
tirety and substituting the following in its place: See 
exhibit "A" attached hereto and incorporated 
herewith. 

15. Amend Article 11 — District Regulations Section 
2740. District Use Regulations, by deleting subsec- 
tion 2742. being the third subsection of Section 2740. 
District Use Regulations, in its entirety, and 
substituting the following in its place: 

2742a. In the floodway, designated on the Chelmsford 
Flood Plain and Floodway District Map, the follow- 
ing provisions shall apply: 



1. 



All encroachments including fill, new construc- 
tion, substantial improvements to existing 



34 



structures, and other development are pro- 
hibited unless certification by a registered pro- 
fessional engineer is provided by the applicant 
demonstrating that such encroachment shall 
not result in any increase in flood levels during 
the occurrence of the 100 -year flood. 

2 . Any encroachment meeting the above standard 
shall comply with the floodplain requirements 
of the State Building Code. 

3. If a property owner questions the location of 
a Flood Plain or Floodway District, the owner 
may engage at his own cost a Registered Li- 
censed Surveyor with the approval of the Town 
Engineer to determine if the land in question 
is within the Flood Plain or Floodway District. 
The Town may charge the landowner for all or 
part of the cost for this determination. 

16. Amend Article III — General Regulations, Section 
3100. Off Street Parking and Loading, subsection 
3120. Number of spaces, by deleting the first para- 
graph in its entirety and substituting the following 
in its place. 

3120. Number of Spaces For the purpose of computing 
the parking requirements of different uses, the 
number of spaces required shall be the largest 
whole number obtained after increasing all frac- 
tions upwards to one. Employees shall include the 
largest number of owners, managers, full and part- 
time workers and volunteers that may be normal- 
ly expected on the premises during any single shift 
or portion thereof. The number of seats in ben- 
ches, pews, or other continuous seating ar- 
rangements shall be calculated at 20 inches for 
each seat. Parking spaces shall be no less than 8.5 
feet in width and 19 feet in length. The following 
minimum parking requirements shall apply to uses 
as listed below: 

17. Amend Article III — General Regulations, Section 
3100. Off Street Parking and Loading, by adding 
the following subsection 3121. Size of Parking Area 
and 3122. Handicapped Parking Areas: 

3121. Size of Parking Area 

(a) The area of the parking lot shall be determin- 
ed by the following table. 



STALL AND AISLE DIMENSIONS 



Angle X 



30 



16.9 


11.0 


26.4 


17.0 


19.4 


13.5 


32.9 


12.0 


20.7 


18.5 


37.2 


9.8 


20.8 


19.5 


38.6 


9.0 


20.2 


24.0 


38.9 


8.6 


19.0 


27.0 


38.0 


8.5 



23.8 
19.4 
13.8 



16.5 
13.4 



STALL AND AISLE DIAGRAM 

(b) If a property owner can demonstrate to the 
satisfaction of the Planning Board/Builder In- 
spector that the required number of spaces will 
not be needed for the purposed use, the Plan- 
ning Board may waive some of the required 
spaces on the condition that the area necessary 
for those spaces is available on the lot. If, 
anytime after the property is in use, the 
Building Inspector determines that a need ex- 
ists for the additional spaces, the Building In- 
spector may require that these spaces be added. 

3122. Handicapped Parking Areas. Article VI Police 
Regulations of the Town of Chelmsford General 
By-Laws, entitled Section 20 Prohibition on 
unauthorized Parking in Designated Handicap- 
ped Parking Spaces in Private or Public Ways, 
is incorporated herein. 

18. Amend Article III — General Regulations, Section 
3100. Off Street Parking and Loading, by deleting 
subsection 3141. in its entirety, and adding the follow- 
ing subsection in its place. 

3141. No off street parking area shall be located within 
20 feet of a street right of way, or in any required 
yard adjacent to a residential or institutional use. 

19. Amend Article III. General Regulations, Section 
3100. Off Street Parking and Loading, by adding 
the following subsection. 

3146. Parking Garages. An application for a special per- 
mit for a parking garage shall require the submis- 
sion of a site plan in conformance with Section 
1420. Site Plan Review. No parking garage shall 
exceed three stores in height (35 feet), and when 
taken in consideration with the principal structure, 
shall not exceed the lot coverage for the applicable 
zoning district. 

20. Amend Article III — General Regulations, subsection 
3351. Overspill, by adding the following sub- 
paragraph (e) 

3351. (e) Exterior lighting fixtures other than signs are 
mounted not more than 20 feet high. 

21. Amend Article III — General Regulations, Section 
3400. Grading and Screening, by deleting subsec- 
tion 3423, in its entirety and substituting the follow- 
ing in its place. 

3423. Screening in this context shall mean any of the 
following items: 

(a) an area 10 feet wide or wider when specified, 
densely planted and maintained with a dou- 
ble row of compact evergreen trees 6 feet or 
more in height when planted; the area between 
the ground and a point 6 feet above the ground 



35 



shall be maintained as the trees mature to in- 
sure a dense screening; 

(b) a wall 6 feet high; 

(c) a fence, 6 feet high, 50 percent opaque; 

(d) an earthen berm at least 42 inches in height, 
with a fence or vegetation to reach 6 feet in 
height; 

(e) an equivalent visual screening by building 
placement, natural vegetation or difference in 
elevation between potential viewers and the 
screened areas. 

Where necessary, lower elements shall be used for 
egress visibility. 

22. Amend Article IV— Special Regulation, by deleting 
subsection 4160. Animals Accessory to Dwellings, 
and substituting the following in its place: 

4160. Animals Accessory to Dwelling. Cattle, horses, 
sheep, hogs, goats, gamebirds, or similar livestock 
may be maintained accessory to a dwelling only on 
a lot having an area of not less than 40,000 square 
feet plus 15,000 square feet per large animal (25 
pounds or heavier at maturity) in excess of one or 
per ten smaller animals in excess of the first ten. 
Such animals and their wastes shall be contained 
at least 50 feet from any abutting lot line of a 
residentially used lot, and at least 50 feet from any 
year-round surface water body. 

23. Amend Article IV— Special Regulations, by deleting 
subsections 4542 and 4543 in their entirety and 
substitute the following subsections 4542. and 4543., 
in their place. 

4542. As part of the site plan review process, the appli- 
cant shall submit, at his cost, a report by a licens- 
ed engineer on the impact of traffic from the 
proposed development on the existing conditions. 
This report shall contain: an analysis of the pre- 
sent situation, the potential traffic resulting from 
the development, the impact of new traffic on the 
existing road conditions and capacities. Capacity 
of the road(s) affected by the proposed develop- 
ment shall be determined by using the definitions 
and methods of estimation as outlined by the 
Highway Research Board Highway Capacity 
Manual, 1965 or later editions. If the study shows 
that there will be an increase in traffic above the 
present level of services at any point within one mile 
of the premises, the engineer shall prepare alter- 
native techniques to maintain the same level of 
service. 

4543. Design of storm sewers, retention basins and 
general site plan design shall be based on a ten- 
year frequency storm. Design of culverts shall be 



based on a twenty-five year frequency storm. Con- 
sideration shall be given to damage avoidance for 
a 100 -year storm. There shall be no net increase 
of runoff above current flows, and the design 
capacity of receiving structures or the channel 
capacity of receiving streams shall not be exceeded. 

24. Amend Article IV— Special Regulations by adding 
the following subsections, 4450. Density Bonus, and 
4451: 

4450. Density Bonus. For every one unit in ten set aside 
for low and moderate income persons and families 
in a multifamily housing project, the applicant 
may apply and the Planning Board may grant a 
bonus of one additional unit. 

To apply the applicant shall demonstrate to the 
Planning board that: 

(a) The rent required for the unit set aside shall 
meet the affordable rents established by the 
Department of Housing and urban Develop- 
ment for the Chelmsford area; and 

(b) The unit set aside shall be made available to 
low and moderate income persons and families 
for a period of no less than ten years; and 

(c) The low and moderate income level shall be as 
defined by the Department of Housing and Ur- 
ban Development for the Chelmsford area. 

4451. The applicant shall work with the Housing 
Authority to rent units to eligible persons and 
families. 

25. Amend Article V— Definitions by deleting the defini- 
tions of farm, fast food restaurant, motel or hotel, 
outdoors commercial recreation, temporary struc- 
ture, and warehouse, and open storage in their en- 
tirety, and substitute the following in their respective 
places. 

Farm: Any parcel of land which is used for gain in 
the raising of agricultural products, livestock, poultry, 
dairy products and game fowl. It includes necessary 
farm structures within the prescribed limits of the 
storage of equipment used. It excludes the raising of 
fur bearing animals, hogs, riding academies, livery 
or boarding stables and dog kennels. 

Fast Food Restaurant: An establishment whose prin- 
cipal business is the sale of prepared or rapidly 
prepared food directly to the customer in a ready to 
consume state for consumption either within the 
restaurant building or off premises and usually re- 
quires ordering food at a counter. 

Motel or Hotel: A building or group of buildings 
providing accommodation for compensation on a 
transient basis, but not meeting the definition of 



36 



"Boarding House." Accommodations individually 
having a stove and either or both a refrigerator and 
sink shall be considered dwelling units. 

Outdoor Commercial Recreation: Drive-in theater, 
golf driving range, miniature golf, race track, amuse- 
ment park, professional sports stadium, or similar 
commercial recreation conducted in whole or in part 
outdoors. 

Temporary Structure: A structure without any foun- 
dation or footings to be removed within a 12 month 
time period. Said structure shall conform to the re- 
quirements of the Intensity Schedule of Section 2600 
and shall receive a permit from the Building In- 
spector. 

Transport Terminal: Terminal facilities for handl- 
ing freight with or without maintenance facilities. 

Warehouse: A building used primarily for the storage 
of goods arid materials, for distribution, but not for 
sale on the premises. 

26 . Amend Article V— Definitions by adding the follow- 
ing definitions: 

Animal Clinic or Hospital: A place where animals 
or pets are given medical or surgical treatment and 
the boarding of animals is limited to short term care 
incidental to the clinic or hospital use. 

Boarding House: A dwelling or part thereof in which 
lodging is provided by the owner or operator to more 
than four boarders. Where four or more unrelated 
individuals rent a dwelling, it shall be considered a 
boarding house. 

Business Daycare: An accessory school operated on 
a regular basis designed to provide daytime care or 
instruction of children five years of age and under. 
This service is limited to the employees of the firm 
sponsoring it, or the employees working in the struc- 
ture where the business day care is located. 

Hazardous Material: Any substance which is listed 
in, but not limited to, the EPA Priority Pollutants 
as described in Section 307(a) of the Clean Water Act, 
as amended. 

Impervious: Any area impenetrable by surface water. 

Kennel: An establishment in which more than three 
dogs or domesticated animals are housed, groomed, 
bred, boarded, trained or sold located on at least five 
(5) acres of land. 

Motor Vehicle Body Repairs: An establishment, 
garage or work area enclosed within a building where 
repairs are made or caused to be made to motor vehi- 
cle bodies, including fenders, bumpers and similar 
components of motor vehicle bodies, but does not in- 



clude the storage vehicles for the cannibalization of 
parts. 

Open Lot Storage: Outdoor storage of bulk goods 
and products for distribution but not for sale on the 
premises. 

Parking Garage: A structure which is accessory to 
a commercial or industrial establishment and is 
primarily for the parking and storage of vehicles 
operated by the customers, visitors and employees of 
such an establishment. 

Recharge Area: An area of geologic deposits through 
which water from the surface can inflitrate through 
the soil to the groundwater. These geologic deposits 
generally consist of stratified sand and gravels. 

Refuse Incinerator: An engineered apparatus with 
grate area in ecess of ten square feet used to burn 
waste and in which all combustion can be controll- 
ed which is approved by the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Health and the Chelmsford Board of 
Health. 

Salvage Yard: Property where motor vehicles are 
junked dismantled or stored for later dismantling or 
distribution. 

Sanitary Landfill: A site for solid waste disposal ap- 
proved by the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health and the Chelmsford Board of Health. 
Disposal of raw sewage and similar waste items are 
not permitted. 

Solid Waste Disposal Facility: Refuse transfer sta- 
tion, composing plant, solid waste recycling opera- 
tion and any other works or use approved by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the 
Board of Health of the Town of Chelmsford for pro- 
cessing, handling, treating, and disposing of solid or 
liquid waste materials, including garbage, rubbish, 
junk, discarded bulk items, and sludges but not raw 
sewage, and similar waste items. 

Toxic Materials: A combination of pollutants in- 
cluding disease carrying agents, which after discharge 
and upon exposure, ingestion, inhalation, and 
assimilation into any organism can cause death, 
disease, mutations, deficiencies, or malfunctions in 
such organisms or their offspring; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by deleting the present Zon- 
ing Map and substituting the redrafted Map proposed by 
the Planning Board, as filed with the Town Clerk, and 
displayed at the Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 



37 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law of the Town of Chelmsford by adding the 
following Section 4700 Residential Cluster Development: 

4700. RESIDENTIAL CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT 

4700. Intent. Residential Cluster Developments, 
hereinafter known as RCD, may be allowed by 
special permit by the Planning Board for the pur- 
pose of providing attractive, convenient, efficient 
neighborhoods and to promote the conservation of 
open space and the efficient use of land in har- 
mony with its natural features. 

4710. Minimum Size of Development. The tract of land 
proposed for an RCD shall contain 10 acres or shall 
have the minimal capacity for ten (10) dwelling 
units computed in accordance with this ordinance, 
whichever is greater. These proposals shall be per- 
mitted only within a subdivision as defined in 
Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

4711. Maximum Number of Dwelling Units in a RCD. 

The maximum number dwelling units in an RCD 
shall not exceed the number computed as follows: 

A. Land unsuitable for development, as herein 
defined, shall first be deducted from the tract 
proposed for development. 

B. The remaining land in the tract shall be divid- 
ed by the minimum lot size for the applicable 
zoning district. 

Proposed tract of land — Unsuitable 

land = Maximun number of 

Minimum Lot Size dwelling 

units 

C. In no case shall the number of dwelling units 
permitted in the RCD exceed the number of 
which would have been permitted in the Zon- 
ing District(s) in which the tract lies if 
developed in the conventional manner. 

4712. Land Unsuitable for Development 

A. Eighty (80) percent of the wetlands as defined 
in Chapter 131, Section 40A of the Massachu- 
setts General Laws as amended. 



shall be located so as to comply with the minimum 
yard dimensions for principal and accessory build- 
ings for the applicable zoning district. 



. Minimum Lot Area. 




A. Minimum lot 


area: 


20,000 sq. ft 


Frontage: 




50 ft. 


Side Yard: 




12 ft. 


Front Yard: 




20 ft. 


Rear Yard: 




20 ft. 



4720. Subdivision Approval Required. No part of the 
construction of an RCD shall begin until the plan 
of such Development has been granted final ap- 
proval by the Planning Board in accordance with 
the Subdivision Regulations. The developer shall 
submit with the request for an RCD an alternate 
plan(s) for developing the site as a conventional 
subdivision at the presubmission review and 
preliminary plan stages of the Subdivision process 
which shall adhere to all subdivision requirements. 
The Planning Board may establish additional rules 
and regulations to govern the RCD and the filing 
of additional material or information. 

4730. General Requirements 

A. RCD's are permitted only in Residential 
Districts. The Planning Board shall not ap- 
prove a cluster development in an established 
single family neighborhood where in their 
determination, such land use will be inconsis- 
tent with or will have a detrimental effect upon 
the surrounding property. If the Planning 
Board denies an RCD based on this section they 
shall identify this as the reason for denial. 

B. The minimum frontage of the parcel for 
development proposals shall be at least fifty feet 
in all residential districts. Additional frontage 
may be required if more than one access road 
is deemed necessary by the Planning Board. 

C. All streets in an RCD shall be improved in ac- 
cordance with the requirements and specifica- 
tions of the Subdivision Regulations. Driveways 
and other paved areas intended to remain in 
private ownership shall be approved as to design 
and construction standards by the Planning 
Board. 



B. Eighty (80) percent of the land located within 
a flood plain. 

C. Eighty (80) percent of the land unable to 
receive septic system approval by the Board of 
Health. 

4713. Restriction on Location of Structures. If any part 
of a dwelling or accessory building in an RCD is 
proposed to be located within 100 feet of the 
perimeter of such Development, such building(s) 



A written agreement or contract to be executed 
between the developer and the Town of Chelms- 
ford shall be submitted at the final stage of the 
Subdivision review stating: 

1. That the owner or developer will construct 
the development and install improvements 
both public and private in accordance with 
the approved plan. A bond shall be posted 
to guarantee completion. 



38 



2. That in the event of failure of the owners, 
successors, or assigns to maintain any com- 
mon open space, recreation areas, land- 
scaping features or other required 
improvements the Town may enter said 
development and perform such necessary 
maintenance work and charge the cost, in- 
cluding attorney fees to the owner, suc- 
cessor, or assigns. 

3. That this contract shall be binding upon 
the heirs, assigns, successors or receivers of 
the development and shall constitute a lien 
on the property in the development. 

4. Any other conditions required by the Plan- 
ning Commission. 

E. A site plan in addition to the final Subdivision 
Plan, shall be recorded after the RCD is ap- 
proved. As a minimum this site plan shall show 
the whole development indicating lots, roads, 
easements, open space, phases for development, 
any recreational uses or buildings to be con- 
structed in the open space and any ponds, 
streams or wetlands. This plan shall be approv- 
ed by the Planning Board before it is recorded. 

4740. Open Space 

A. No less than 25 percent of the total land area 
of an RCD, shall be open space. This land shall 
not include building lots, street rights-of-way, 
or facilities or land which is designated by Sec- 
tion 4712 as being unsuitable for development. 

B. At least one-half of the open space (or 12.5 per- 
cent of the total land area) shall be useable for 
active recreation. 

C. Provisions shall be made to ensure that no more 
than 20 percent of the open space (5 percent 
of the total area) shall be devoted to paved areas 
and structures devoted to recreational uses or 
uses accessory to permitted uses. 

D. Use of the open space as permitted in 
paragraph (H) shall be subject to site plan 
review by the Planning Board. All structural 
improvements shall be a part of the final sub- 
mission plans approved by the Board, or may 
be included by amendment at any time prior 
to the conveyance of the first lot. Following the 
conveyance of at least 75 percent of the lots; 
such improvements may be permitted by the 
Board with the written concurrence of at least 
two-thirds (%) of the homeowner association 
membership. No structure on the open space 
may be located within fifty (50') feet of residen- 
tial property abutting the RCD. 



E. Strips of open space shall be permitted only as 
usable access paths between residences, streets, 
other open space areas, as drainage areas, and 
as buffers. 

F. Access areas to the open space shall be clearly 
marked with appropriate materials to disting- 
uish open space area from private property. 

G. Open space may be in one or more parcels, the 
size, location, shape and character of which 
must be suitable for the designated uses. 

H. Open space may be used for active recreation, 
passive recreation, conservation, forestry, 
agriculture, natural buffers, open space, struc- 
tures accessory to approved uses including sep- 
tic systems and package sewage treatment 
facilities. No open space area shall be used for 
the disposal of stumps, stones or other fill 
resulting from the construction of the im- 
provements of the RCD. 

I. Land which has been environmentally dam- 
aged prior to final approval of the development 
by the Planning Board as a result of soil and 
earth removal operations, harvesting of trees or 
other natural features or refuse disposal or 
other causes shall not be accepted as common 
open space unless and until the land is restored 
to a condition which the Planning Board deter- 
mines to be reasonable and appropriate to ef- 
fectuate the purpose of this Article. The 
Planning Board may grant final approval for 
an RCD subject to such restoration of the com- 
mon open space provided an appropriate per- 
formance bond is posted. 



4750. Ownership of Common Open Space 

A. The required open space shall be owned in 
common by all the landowners in the plat. The 
deed to each lot shall include a fractional in- 
terest in the common open space in an amount 
proportionate to the number of lots in the plat. 
The deed shall also include any covenants, 
restrictions, or easements attached to the RCD, 
each lot, or the common open space and any 
homeowners' association agreements pertain- 
ing thereto. 

B. Open space shall be protected against building 
development and environmental damage by 
conveying to the Town a conservation restric- 
tion pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 84, Section 31-33 which shall be en- 
forceable by the Conservation Commission. 



39 



4760. Maintenance of Open Space — Homeowners' 
Association 

A. The applicant or developer shall provide for 
and establish a Homeowners' Association as a 
non-profit organization or other legal entity 
under the laws of Massachusetts for the use, 
care and maintenance of all such lands and im- 
provements. Membership in the association 
shall be mandatory for all landowners within 
the RCD, and each lot shall be entitled to equal 
representation. The association shall be formed 
prior to conveyance of the first lot. The assess- 
ment of dues and/or fees for structural im- 
provements requires the affirmative vote of no 
less than two-thirds (%) of the homeowner 
association membership. 

B. Such organization shall be created by covenants 
and restrictions running with the land and shall 
be composed of all persons having ownership 
within the development. Such organizations 
shall be responsible for the perpetuation, 
maintenance and function of all common 
lands, uses and facilities. 

C. All lands and improvements shall be describ- 
ed and identified as to location, size, use and 
control in a restrictive covenant, and such cove- 
nant shall set forth the method of assessment 
for the maintenance of such land. These 
restrictive covenants shall be written so as to run 
with the land. These covenants shall become 
part of the deed to each lot or parcel within 
the development. 

D. Such restrictive covenant and organization shall 
continue in effect so as to control the avail- 
ability of the facilities and land thereby pro- 
vided, to maintain the land and facilities for 
their intended function, and to protect the 
development from additional and unplanned 
densities of use. Such organization shall not be 
dissolved without the prior approval of the 
Planning Board, nor shall such organization 
dispose of any common open space, by sale or 
otherwise, except to an organization conceiv- 
ed and organized to own and/or maintain the 
common open space and approved by the Plan- 
ning Board. 

E. The Homeowners' Association shall be respon- 
sible for guaranteeing that no land in common 
open space shall be used or disturbed in any 
manner inconsistent with the uses and intent 
of this Article. 

F. In the event the Association fails to maintain 
any common open space, recreation area, land- 
scaping area, or other improvements, including 
private roadways, drainage systems and so on, 
the Town of Chelmsford may enter into said 



development and perform the necessary 
maintenance work and charge the cost, in- 
cluding attorney fees to the association. 

G. Notwithstanding any provision of the covenants 
establishing a Homeowners' Association, 
ultimate legal liability and responsibility for the 
use and maintenance of the common open 
space shall rest with the individual lot owners, 
and any legal notices concerning the common 
open space which are sent by the Town may be 
directed to the individual lot owners or the 
Homeowners' Association. 

4770. Homeowners' Association 

A. Before an applicant or developer can establish 
a non-profit organization as required in Sec- 
tion 4760 in addition to all other required 
recommendations, the following documents 
shall be submitted to and approved by the 
Planning Board: 

1. The articles of association or other 
organizational documentation for the non- 
profit organization; 

2. The by-laws of the non-profit organization 
and a list of officers and their terms of 
office; 

3 . The covenants or restrictions related to the 
use of common property, including the 
system and amounts of assessments for 
perpetuation and maintenance; 

4. A document granting the rights of entry 
upon such common property to Town of- 
ficials, law enforcement officers, rescue 
personnel and fire fighting personnel while 
in pursuit of their duties; 

5. A time schedule for the maintenance of 
major facilities, including streets not ac- 
cepted into the town highway system, 
private street signs and sidewalks, parking 
area improvements, buildings, pools and 
other common areas; 

6. A copy of the Deed of Conveyance and Ti- 
tle of Certificate, where applicable, for all 
lands proposed to be conveyed to the Town 
or other appropriate governmental agency; 

7. A plan for the transfer of control of the 
common open space from the developer to 
the Homeowners' Association; 

8 . A copy of any management policies or pro- 
posed management policies for the whole 
development or common open space. 



40 



B. Each original purchaser of a lot in the Residen- 
tial Cluster Development (RCD) must be given 
by the developer a copy of all documents out- 
lined in the above paragraph. 

C. The Planning Board may require the developer 
to submit a fiscal program for a maximum of 
ten (10) years, including adequate reserve funds 
for the maintenance and care of all lands, 
streets, facilities, and uses under the purview 
of the Homeowners' organization. 

D. The documents set forth above shall be review- 
ed and approved by the Planning Board, and 
such approval shall be obtained before the final 
plat is approved. The articles of association or 
other organizational documentation shall be fil- 
ed with the appropriate state agency prior to 
obtaining final approval by the Planning 
Board. Such documents, once approved, shall 
be recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

4780. Required Certificates or Documents. In addition 
to the requirements of Section 4770, the following 
certificates or documents shall be submitted in ac- 
cordance with the Subdivision Rgulations. 

A. Copies of any proposed management policies 
and existing or proposed deed restrictions or 
covenants running with the land in the develop- 
ment. 



C. The following disclosure shall be required: 

1. Prior to approval by the Planning Board, 
the developer must file and have approval 
by the Planning Board a sample Purchase 
and Sale Agreement which shall be used 
for the purpose of individual lots and 
dwellings. Said Agreement shall include in 
conspicuous type the following: 

that the property is part of an RCD sub- 
ject to the Zoning By-Law and the Subdi- 
vision Regulations of the Town of 
Chelmsford; that the purchaser and subse- 
quent owners of the property are subject 
to the requirements therein contained; that 
the purchaser shall be required to be a 
member of a Homeowners' Association, 
shall be subject to rules and regulations of 
said Association and shall be liable for any 
applicable assessment made by or against 
said Association and that the ultimate 
liability for the open space falls on the in- 
dividual lot owner. The Purchase and Sale 
Agreement shall further contain a state- 
ment by the seller that the purchaser has 
been provided with a copy of the docu- 
ments as required in Section 4770 and a 
prospectus which shall be a summarization 
in layman's language of the information 
contained in the other documents; 



B. A description of any existing easement, 
covenants, or restrictions affecting land within 
the development and an instrument conveying 
any easements required as condition of ap- 
proval to the Town. Such easements shall in- 
clude that which is required by Section 4750, 
Item B. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Planning Board 



Business Uses See Sec. 4500 for Major Business Complexes 

Retail stores and services not elsewhere listed ( 

Motor Vehicle Sales ( 

Motor Vehicle Rental ( 

Motor Vehicle General Repair ( 

Motor Vehicle Light Service (2) ( 

Motor Vehicle Parts (No Services) ( 

Motor Vehicle Body Repair ( 

Restaurant ( 

Fast Food Establishment ( 

Business. Professional Offices ( 

Medical Center. Clinic ( 

Bank, Financial Agency ( 

Indoor Commercial Recreation ( 

Outdoor Commercial Recreation ( 

Fairs, Carnivals, Similar Events (See Section 4300) ( 

Animal Clinic or Hospital ( 

Animal Kennel ( 

Funeral Home ( 

Nursing or Convalescent Home ( 

Adult Entertainment Establishment (See Section 4600) ( 

Motel or Hotel ( 



2300 USE REGULATIONS 
RB RC RM CA CB 



P(l) P(4) P(4) P)4) 



P(4) 


O 


P(4) 


BA 


P 


P 


P(4) 


O 


P(4) 


P(4) 


BA 


BA 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P(4) 


P(4) 


P(4) 


P(4) 



P(4) O 



41 



Industrial Uses See Sec. 4500 for Major B 

Comlexes 

Earth Removal (See Sec. 4200) 

Light Industry 

Pedestrian and Vehicular acce 

to and from uses permitted 
Warehouses and Open Storage 
Junk Yard 
Contractor's Yard 
Granite Operations 
Public Utility or Public Works Storage Yard 

or Repair Shop 
Research, Experimental and Testing Lab 
Solid Waste Disposal Facility 
Sanitary Landfill 
Refuse Incinerator 
Transport Terminal 



and Egress by Private Way 
an IA District < 



Institutional Uses See Sec. 4500 for Major 1 
Religious Purposes 
Educational Purposes 

Exempt by Statute 

Other Nursery Schools 

Other Schools 
Cemetery 
Municipal Building Except Garages, Storage 

or Repair Shops 
Hospital 
Other Public or Semi-Public Institution of a 

Historic, Philanthropic, or Charitable Ch; 



Recreational Uses 

Club or Lodge 
Riding Academy or 
Boathouse. Private 
Boathouse, Public 
Golf Course 
Campground 



Public Stables 



Residential Uses 
Single-family Dwelling 
Two-Family Dwelling 
Multi-Family Dwelling 
Conversion of Dwellings {st 
Boarding House 
Mobile Home 
Cluster Development 



P(6) O 



Rural Uses 

Farm, 5 acres or mo 
Farm, under 5 acres 
Wood Operation 

Other Principal Us- 
Airport 



Accessory Uses See Sec. 4500 for Major Business Comple 

Family Day Care Home 

Business Daycare 

Home Occupation (See Sec. 4110) 

Mobile Home Storage 

Roadside Stand 

Barn Sale, Garage Sale. Yard Sale, Flea Market 

(see Sec. 4130) 
Scientific Uses (see Sec. 4140) 
Retail sale of goods, the majority of which are 

produced or undergo major processing on the 

premises 
Adult Entertainment Establishment (see Sec. 4600) 
Temporary Structure 
Parking Garage 



O 



O 



o 



BA 



BA 



BA(7) BAS(7) O 



NOTES FOR USE REGULATIONS SCHEDULE: 

1. No structure shall exceed 3,000 sq. ft. gross floor area. 

2. Provided there are no structures, pumps, or fuel storage tanks within 50 feet of a residential lot or residential district. 

3. Provided that there are neither hogs nor fur-bearing animals. 

4. Except "BA" if resulting in more than 10,000 sq. ft. gross floor area devoted to business uses on the premises. 

5. Maximum seating capacity shall be 30 and no alcoholic beverages shall be sold or consumed on the premises. 

6. Intensity of use shall be limited to permit a maximum of 7 units per acre and a maximum of 254 units per RMH Dis 

7. Retail outlet not to exceed 1,000 sq. ft. or 10% of the EG. A., whichever is less. 

8. No roadside stands permitted in Historic District(s). 



KEY: 

P = A permitted use. 

O = An excluded or prohibited use. 

BA = A use authorized under Special Permit for exception from the Board of Appeals as provided for in Section 1500. 

PB = A use authorized under a Special Permit for exception from the Planning Board as provided for in Section 1500. 



42 



2600. Intensity of Use Schedule 



Minimum Lot Requirements 
Area (100 sq. ft.) (g) 
Width (feet) 
Depth (feet) 
Frontage (feet) 

Minimum Yard Requirements 
Front (feet) (c) 
Side (feet) 
Rear (feet) 

M; 



Building 
Coverage (percent) 
Height (feet) 



% of Lot Area 
Landscaped Open Space 
Located in Front Yard 



(1) EXHIBIT A 



RM 

40(a) 



IS cx 

40(b) 40 



25(d) 
30(d) 



10 



200 
200 
200 



20 60 60 20 40(f) 40(f) 60 20 

10(e) 30(e) 30(e) 10(e) 40(f) 40(f) 30(e) 10(e) 
10(e) 20(e) 30(e) 10(e) 30(f) 30(f) 20 10 



10 



10 



10(h) 10(h) 10 



Footnotes to Intensity of Use Schedule 

a. For multi-family dwellings, not less than 80,000 square feet or 6,000 square feet per dwelling unit, whichev 

b. For Solid Waste Disposal Facility, Sanitary Landfill. Refuse Incinerator or Granite Operations, 

c. Corner lots shall maintain front yard requirements for each street frontage. 



: is greater, 
shall be 10 ; 



Increase by 20 feet where abutting an RA or RB District. At least 20 feet of any or all such yards abutting an RA or RB District shall be landscaped open space or natural 
screening subject to Section 3423 of this Bylaw. 



Increase by 20 feet when abutting a residential distr 
Section 3423. 



Required side and rear yards abutting any residential district shall be landscaped open space and screened subject 



f. Increase to 100 feet when abutting a residential district; 20 feet of this shall be landscaped open space and screened subject to Section 3423. 

g. For non-family accommodations, increase minimum lot area by 10% for each person accommodated in excess of eight, 
h. Required to be located in front yards. 

i. Municipal waste water pumping stations for any sewer system with the Town of Chelmsford shall not be subject to lot. yard, or coverage requirement. 



43 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
zoning by-law of the Town of Chelmsford by adding the 
following Section 4800. Aquifer Protection District. 

4800 AQUIFER PROTECTION DISTRICT 

4810. Purpose. The purpose of an Aquifer Protection 
District, hereinafter known as APD, is to protect 
the public drinking water supply and the public 
health by preventing the contamination of Chelms- 
ford's groundwater. 

4820. Aquifer Protection District. The APD is establish- 
ed as an overlay district to the Town's zoning map. 
This APD was designed by the surficial geology on 
the area and groundwater flow (based on a U.S. 
Geological Survey Surficial Geology Map and the 
Chelmsford Facilities Plan by Weston & Sampson 
Engineers, Inc.). Any area in which groundwater 
flow is directed toward a well and the surficial 
geology is stratified sand and gravel deposits (soils 
which yield groundwater to wells) is included in the 
APD. 

If a property owner questions the location of any 
boundary of an APD, the owner may engage at his 
own cost a professional hydrogeologist or soils 
engineer who must be approved by the Planning 
Board of the Town, to determine if the land in 
question is a recharge area. 

4830. Use Regulations. The use schedule for all zoning 
districts shall apply, except as modified in this sec- 
tion. In all cases the more stringent provision shall 
apply. 

4831. The following uses are prohibited within the APD: 

A. The manufacture, use, storage, transport, or 
disposal of toxic or hazardous materials as a 
principal activity. 

B. Solid waste disposal facility, sanitary landfill, 
refuse incinerator, salvage yard, junk yard, 
storage yard, road salt stockpile. 

C. Truck/bus terminals and contractor's yards with 
more than 10 vehicles, service station and auto 
repair shops. 

D. Car washes, or coin-operated and commercial 
laundries, where not connected to public 
sewers. 

E. Subsurface storage of toxic or hazardous 
materials, fuel oil or gasoline. 

F. Solid waste disposal or sewage treatment 
facilities with onsite disposal of the effluent, 
unless tertiary treatment is used. 

4832. The following uses require a Special Permit from 
the Planning Board within the APD: 



A. Above ground storage of more than 500 gallons 
of toxic or hazardous materials, fuel oil or 
gasoline. 

B. Any residential use with a lot size less than the 
intensity use schedule requires for that par- 
ticular residential zone. 

C. Any use except for residential with an estimated 
sewage disposal greater than 10 gallons of 
sewage per day per 1,000 square feet of lot area, 
based on Title V of the State Environmental 
Code, 310 CMR 15.00. 

D. Any use which renders impervious more than 
50 percent of the total lot area. 

4840. Special Permits. Special Permits may be granted 
by the Planning Board, if the requirements of the 
APD are met and if the granting of such a permit 
follows the general intent of the zoning bylaw. Prior 
to granting a special permit, the Planning Board 
shall review the proposed control measures and 
shall determine if these control measures are ade- 
quate with respect to possible groundwater con- 
tamination if a failure occurred. If the Planning 
Board denies a special permit, the reason for the 
denial must be stated. After receiving a special per- 
mit application, the Planning Board shall 
distribute one copy each to the Board of Health, 
the Conservation Commission and the Building In- 
spector for their review. If a response is not receiv- 
ed within 35 days by these agencies, the Planning 
Board will assume the agency approve. A special 
permit may be granted by the Planning Board, if, 
after review of the applications and comments from 
the Board of Health, the Conservation Commis- 
sion and the Building Inspector, the Planning 
Board finds that the groundwater quality will not 
fall below state or federal drinking water standards, 
or if the groundwater quality is below these stan- 
dards no further degradation of the groundwaters 
will occur. 

4841. Special Permit Application. Eleven (11) copies of 
the Special Permit Application shall be submitted 
to the Planning Board in accordance with Section 
1250. In addition, the application shall include: 

A. A complete list of all fuels, chemicals, 
pesticides, and other potentially toxic or hazar- 
dous materials which are being used or stored 
on the premises in quantities greater than aver- 
age household use. 

B. Detailed plans shall be submitted of the storage 
tank or pipeline being used to store or transport 
the toxic or hazardous materials, fuels, 
chemicals or pesticides. These plans should also 
show how the storage tanks or pipeline is pro- 
tected from corrosion, leaks, spills, and van- 
dalism. 



44 



C. Evidence of qualified professional supervision 
of the design and installation of above and 
below ground storage of toxic and hazardous 
materials. 

D. Evidence of qualified professional supervision 
of the design and installation for any use with 
an estimated sewage flow greater than 1,000 
gpd (other than single family). Impacts of 
nitrates, chlorides, and coliforms on ground- 
water quality must also be addressed; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Planning Board 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary 
and/or permanent easements, and any property in fee sim- 
ple, by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, on the 
property described as Parcel C on a certain plan of file with 
the Town Engineer entitled "Easement Plan of Land in 
Chelmsford, MA. prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Scale 1"40', March 10, 1986, by Vanasse/Hangen Engineer- 
ing, Inc., Consulting Engineers and Planners, 60 Birming- 
ham Parkway, Boston, Massachusetts" for the purpose of 
construction improvements, widening, laying out and ac- 
cepting said portion of Mill Road and to see if the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer and appropriate 
from available funds, transfer and appropriate from the 
Stabilization Fund, transfer and appropriate revenue shar- 
ing funds and/or borrow a certain sum of money to defray 
all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with 
the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages 
which may be awarded as the result of any such taking; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see of if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary 
and/or permanent easements, and any property in fee sim- 
ple, by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, on the 
property prescribed as Parcel 1 on a certain plan on file 
with the town Engineer entitled "Easement Plan of Land 
in Chelmsford, MA. prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Scale 1"40', October 29, 1984, by Vanasse/Hangen 
Engineering, Inc., Consulting Engineers and Planners, 60 
Birmingham Parkway, Boston, Massachusetts" for the pur- 
pose of construction improvements, widening, laying out 
and accepting said portion of Billerica Road and to see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer and 
appropriate from available funds, transfer and appropriate 
from the Stabilization fund, transfer and appropriate 
revenue sharing funds and/or borrow a certain sum of 
money to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in 
connection with the acquisition of said land and for pay- 
ing any damages which may be awarded as the result of 
any such taking; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary 
and/or permanent easements, and any property in fee sim- 
ple, by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, on the 
property described as Parcel 8 on a certain plan on file 
with the Town Engineer entitled "Easement Plan of Land 
in Chelmsford, MA. prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Scale 1"40', March 10, 1986, by Vanasse/Hangen Engineer- 
ing, Inc., Consulting Engineers and Planners, 60 Birming- 
ham Parkway, Boston, Massachusetts" for the purpose of 
construction improvements, widening, laying out and ac- 
cepting said portion of Billerica Road and to see if the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer and appropriate 
from available funds, transfer and appropriate from the 
Stabilization fund, transfer and appropriate revenue shar- 
ing funds and/or borrow a certain sum of money to defray 
all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with 
the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages 
which may be awarded as the result of any such taking; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to rescind 
the acceptance of the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 48, Section 42, or corresponding provisions 
of earlier laws, as accepted at the Annual Town Meeting 
in 1954 establishing a fire department to be under the con- 
trol of officer to be known as the chief of the department, 
and to see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 48, Section 42A, 
establishing a fire department under the direction of the 
Selectmen, and further to see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a fire chief, 
as authorized in said Chapter 148, Section 42 A, by the 
following procedure: Board of Selectmen shall (1) adver- 
tise that said position is available, to insure the securing 
of the most qualified candidates for said position, (2) re- 
quire all candidates to be tested in a manner equivalent 
with Civil Service examinations, and (3) said Board of 
Selectmen shall appoint from the top three (3) candidates 
of said testing; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to direct the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the Great and General 
Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enact 
special legislation establishing a land bank program for the 
purchase of real estate interest for conservation or preser- 
vation of open space, wetlands, water resource areas, 
agricultural areas, wildlife areas or for active and passive 
recreation areas, and for the management of these and ex- 
isting areas owned by the Town, funded by a fee of up to 
2% on real estate transfer, said land bank to be ad- 
ministered by the Conservation Commission, said bill, when 
approved by the legislature and signed into law by the 
Governor, to be approved in its final form by the voters 
at an annual or Special Town Meeting in order for it to 
be implemented; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



45 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer and appropriate from available 
funds a certain sum of money to the appropriate salary line 
items to fund approved wage and salary increases and ex- 
pense allocations in departmental accounts to be recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen at the Special Town 
Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
and appropriate the sum of $48,924 from reimbursement 
funds received from the State and Federal Governments 
as the result of hurricane "Gloria" to the following depart- 
mental line items and Trust Fund account; or act in rela- 
tion thereto: 



Cemetery Department: 
12. Salaries 

Public Buildings: 
76. Salaries 

Highway Department: 
41. Expense 

Conservation Trust Fund 



7,600.00 

187.00 

36,537.00 

4,600.00 

Board of Selectmen 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. Given 
unto our hands this 23rd day of April, A.D. 1986. 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren, Member 

Henrick R. Johnson, Member 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



APRIL 25, 1986 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: The New Town Office Building Gym; North Con- 
gregational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room; East 
Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafeteria; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; North Congregational Church Hall; 
McCarthy Junior High School, Small Gymnasium; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; McCarthy Junior High School, 
Small Gymnasium; fourteen days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
and appropriate the sum of $19,000 from free cash for the 
purpose of a continuing Traffic Study and Engineering 
Design to alleviate traffic problems on Chelmsford Street 
from Fletcher Street to the Chelmsford Mall; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 



A True Copy Attest, 
William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



Board of Selectmen 



46 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 28, 1986 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the 
McCarthy Jr. High Gymnasium at 7:40 PM, by the 
Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized the presence 
of a quorum. There were 484 voters present. 

The Moderator explained the Town Meeting pro- 
cedure to the voters present. Selectman John P. Emerson 
Jr. moved that the reading of the Constable's return of 
service and the posting of the warrant be waived. It was so 
voted, unanimously. Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. 
moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waived. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 

Elizabeth Marshall, Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee moved to recess the Annual Town Meeting at 7:43 PM 
in order to conduct a Public Budget Hearing of Federal 
Revenue Sharing Funds. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Elizabeth Marshall discussed the Federal Revenue 
Sharing. The sum of $200,000.00 will be available for use 
in fiscal year 1986-1987, and will be allocated as follows: 
Fire Department Salaries $100,000.00, Police Depart- 
ment Salaries $100,000.00. These amounts will be 
reflected in the department's budgets. The sum of 
$200,000.00 represents approximately 15<J on the tax 
rate. The Moderator asked for any discussion or ques- 
tions, hearing none, Elizabeth Marshall moved to have 
the Town Meeting Body accept for approval the Federal 
Revenue Sharing Funds amounts as presented. Motion 
Carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator reconvened the Annual Town Meeting 
at 7:48 PM. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. 
moved that the reports of Town Officers and Committees 
be heard. 

Selectman Emerson moved to hear nominations from 
the floor for the Varney Playground Commission. Motion 
Carried. Selectman Emerson moved to nominate Norbert 
J. McHale for a three year term. The Moderator asked for 
anymore nominations from the floor, hearing none, the 
Moderator declared that nominations were closed. The 
Moderator then asked for a voice vote on Norbert J. 
McHale as commissioner for three years, it was so voted, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Chairman of the Personnel 
Board Alan Murphy moved to amend the article by 
deleting the position of Personnel Director and anything 
within the article in reference to the position. He ex- 
plained that the Personnel Board felt that there was a 
need for a Personnel Director, but different guidelines 
should be established, than the ones presented. The 
amendment reads as follows: 

a) Deleting Item 1 



b) Deleting Item 2 

c) Deleting Item 3 and inserting the following in its 
place: 

3. Under Section 6, subtitled Classification of 
Town Employees, Amend Subsection "E" 
"Wage and Salary Schedule" by deleting the 
existing schedule and substituting the follow- 
ing: 
E. WAGE AND SALARY SCHEDULE 
JULY 1, 1986— JUNE 30, 1987 
Grade Level Salary Range 

1A $11,777 - $14,662 



IB 

1C 
ID 

2 

3 

4 

5 



$13,313 
$14,848 
$17,920 
$22,528 
$30,210 
$34,819 
$39,429 



$16,575 
$18,486 
$22,310 
$28,047 
$37,611 
$43,350 
$49,089 



d) Deleting Items 5 and inserting the following in its 
place: 

5. Under Section 7, subtitled Hiring of New 
Employees, delete Subsection B and substitute 
the following in its place: 

(B) No person shall be employed by the Town 
until such person has a medical examina- 
tion by a licensed practicing physician cer- 
tifying that such person is physically able to 
perform the duties for which he or she is to 
be hired. The physician shall be designated 
by the Personnel Board. All certifications 
shall become a permanent part of the per- 
son's personnel records, provided that this 
requirement shall not apply to persons 
already employed by the Town on the ef- 
fective date of this Amendment, except as 
provided in Section 16 of the By-Law; 

e) Deleting Item 6 and inserting the following in its 
place: 

6. Under Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and 
Standards Rates of wages and Salaries of the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law", by ad- 
ding the following positions: 

Administrative: Clerical 

14. Administrative Assistant to the Executive 
Secretary 

Library 

8. Library Assistant Director 

The Finance Committee was in favor of the motion. 
The Board of Selectmen were not. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to amend, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Elizabeth Mar- 
shall moved to amend the article by deleting section 4 
Subsection Part (F) "Longevity Payments" in its entirety. 



47 



Alan Murphy, Chairman of the Personnel Board spoke 
against the motion. He said that this would apply to only 
those employees who come under the Personnel Board 
who are full time employees. All union employees have 
longevity benefits. Some employees under the Personnel 
Board have longevity, this is why the Personnel Board 
wants to have all employees have equal benefits. He 
estimated a possible cost of $17,000. 

The Moderator asked for further discussion, hearing 
none, he asked for a voice vote on the motion to delete 
longevity, motion defeated, He then asked for a voice 
vote on the main motion as amended, motion carried. 
Article 2 as amended reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Personnel Board Alan Murphy, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to amend the Personnel Wages and 
Salary By-Law to be effective July 1, 1986, as follows: 

3. Under Section 6, subtitled Classification of 
Town Employees, Amend Subsection "E" 
"Wage and Salary Schedule" by deleting the 
existing schedule and substituting the follow- 
ing: 

E. WAGE AND SALARY SCHEDULE 
JULY 1, 1986— JUNE 30, 1987 



Grade Level 

1A 
IB 
1C 
ID 

2 

3 

4 

5 



Salary Range 

$12,065 - $15,021 
$13,637 - $16,978 
$15,210 - $18,936 
$18,357 - $22,854 
$23,078 - $28,732 
$30,947 - $38,529 
$35,669 - $44,408 
$40,390 - $50,286 



4. Under Section 6, subtitled Classification of 
Town Employees, add a new Subsection (F) 
"Longevity Payments": 

(F) Longevity payments shall be provided to 
each regular full time employee covered by 
this Plan as shown below. Longevity is add- 
ed to the base pay. It shall not be used 
when, computing overtime, for purposes of 
retirement or sick leave. Longevity shall be 
paid semi-annually on the first pay day in 
December and the first pay day in June. 
Longevity shall be paid on a pro-rata basis. 

(1) Upon completion of five years full time 
employment, said employee shall receive a 
\ l /z percent increment over and above 
their base pay. 

(2) Upon completion of ten years full time 
employment, said employee shall receive a 
3 percent increment over and above their 
base pay. 



(3) Upon completion of fifteen years full time 
employment, said employee shall receive a 
4Vi percent increment over and above 
their base pay. 

(4) Upon completion of twenty years full time 
employment, said employee shall receive a 
6 percent increment over and above their 
base pay. 

Under Section 7, subtitled Hiring of New 
Employees, delete Subsection B and substitute 
the following in its place: 

(B) No person shall be employed by the Town 
until such person has a medical examina- 
tion by a licensed practicing physician cer- 
tifying that such person is physically able to 
perform the duties for which he or she is to 
be hired. The physician shall be designated 
by the Personnel Board. All certifications 
shall become a permanent part of the per- 
son's personnel records, provided that this 
requirement shall not apply to persons 
already employed by the Town on the ef- 
fective date of this Amendment, except as 
provided in Section 16 of the By-Law; 

Under Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and 
Standards Rates of wages and Salaries of the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law", by ad- 
ding the following positions: 

Administrative Clerical 

14. Administrative Assistant to the Executive 
Secretary 

Library 

8. Library Assistant Director 



UNDER ARTICLE 2A Chairman of the Personnel 
Board, Alan Murphy, moved to amend the article by 
deleting the title Personnel Director from the Adminis- 
trative and Clerical subsection and inserting the title 
Administrative Assistant to the Executive Secretary 
(Proposed Level ID). 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the motion. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

A discussion took place concerning the Fire Chiefs 
Salary. If the salary is voted tonight is that the actual 
salary that will be paid? The Town had a Fire Chief who 
resigned, therefore the position is available, however, a 
decision must be made if the position is to remain that of 
"strong" chief or become that of "weak" chief, by the 
Board of Selectman. Norman LeBrecque moved to table 
Article 2A until 10:00 PM May 12, 1986. He explained 
that at that time a decision may be made by then -con- 
cerning the position. Town Counsel James Harrington, 
explained that the position could be voted as it appears in 



48 



the warrant book and if the Board of Selectmen estab- 
lished that the position will be one of weak chief then the 
Board will set the salary and it will appear in the budget 
of the next annual town meeting. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to table the article. Motion 
defeated. The Moderator then asked if there was any 
more need for further discussion on the main motion as 
amended by the Personnel Board, hearing none he asked 
for a voice vote on the main motion, which left the chair 
in doubt, he asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
Article 2 A reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Personnel Board, Alan Murphy, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Personnel Wage 
and Salary By-Law by further amending Section 24, Job 
Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of 
the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law, to conform to 
rates of pay negotiated by the Town with certain labor 
organizations, pursuant to General Laws Chapter 150E, 
and to reflect current salaries and grade levels under the 
Personnel By-Law as follows: 



ADMINISTRATIVE & CLERICAL 

1 . Executive Secretary 


7/86 - 7/87 

Proposed 

Level 

4 

3 

2 

2 

ID 

ID 

ID 

IC 

1A 

1A 

ID 
ID 


Proposed 
Salary 


3. Veteran's Agent ... 






5. Assistant to Assessors 






7 . Assistant Treasurer . 

8. Clerk, Senior 






9. Clerk, Junior 
















$500 P. A. 
$360 EA. 


12. Board of Reg.. Three Members 


14. Administrative Ass't to the Executive Sec. . . . 





CONSERVATION, PARKS & CEMETERY 

Cemetery Superintendent 

Supt. of Insect & Pest Control 

Landscaper — Park 

Laborer — Park 

Unskilled Laborer 

Skilled Forest Workman 
Equipment Operator . . 
Park Superintendent . . 



CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodian . 



LIBRARY 

1 . Library Director . 

2. Library Depa 

3. Library Specialist 

4. Library Assistant 

5. Library Clerk 

? Assistant . 



'• Page 

8. Library Assistant Director . 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1 . Highway Superintendent . . . 

2. Highway Foreman 



TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1 . Fire Chief 

2. Deputy Fire Chief 

3. Captain 

4. Mechanic (Fire & Police) 



TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. Police Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3 . Captain 



RECREATION 

1 . Director/ Youth Center Coordinator 

2. Clerk. Part-time 

3. Waterfront Director 

4. Swimming Instructor 

5. Lifeguard 

6. Playground Supervisor 

7 . Recreation Specialist 

8. Recreation Leader 

9. Youth Center Supervisor 

10. Youth Center Leaders 

OTHER POSITIONS 

1 . Building Inspector 

2. Electric Inspector 

3. Local Inspector . 

4. Gas Inspector 

5. Dog Officer 

6. Assistant Dog Officer 

7 . Van Driver 

8. Sealer of Weights & Measures 

9. Animal Inspector 

10. Clock Winder 

1 1 . Town Engineer 

FOOTNOTES 

#1 — Represented by Collective Bargaining 
#2 -Not in "Job Rating Plan" 
#4 — Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

#5 -Salary will be 200% of the highest paid Union Firefight. 
State Law. 



$2,000 P. A. 
$1,000 P. A. 
$ 200 P.A. 



i established by 



The Moderator announced to the Town Meeting body 
that Articles 3, 4 and 5, were being withdrawn. No mo- 
tion or activity will take place concerning those three ar- 
ticles. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 The Moderator explained that 
the Departmental Budget requests would be presented as 
the Town Meeting body went thru the article. The final 
vote would be taken at the end of the article after the 
unclassified budget. Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee, Elizabeth Marshall gave a brief presentation of the 
budget, explaining why the Committee recommended 
certain figures. The Finance Committee, Board of Select- 
men, and the School Committee spent a lot of time 
preparing the budget and determining how much was go- 
ing to be spent. 

Treasurer, James Doukszewicz asked if the depart- 
ments with personnel who would now be qualified to 
receive longevity as a result of the vote taken in article 2 
should amend their budgets to reflect the new figures or 
was the Finance Committee going to do so? Also would 
the Finance Committee now include the elected officials 
and members of the Board of Health? The Finance Com- 
mittee said that the monies needed for longevity will be 
transferred, and it would be only for those who come 
under the personnel Board. The elected officials and 
members of the Board of Health, would not be included, 
at this time. 

The Moderator read the individual line items of each 
budget, starting with the Accounting Department 
through the Finance Committee. Under the Fire Depart- 
ment budget discussion took place. Selectman Ready 
moved to amend line item 32 to read $2,356,865. Total 
Fire Department, $2,467,069. Net Cost Fire Department 
$2,367,069. The Finance Committee asked for the pur- 
pose of the amendment. Selectman Ready explained that 
the Negotiation of the Fire Department's three year con- 



49 



tract had been settled and that the agreement was a 7%, 
5% and 5% increase. Elizabeth Marshall, of the Finance 
Committee stated that the Finance Committee had not 
seen a contract, and was unaware that one had been 
signed, and felt that until the committee knew what was 
exactly stated in the contract (concerning benefits, etc.) 
that the Town Meeting Body should not approve the con- 
tract at this time. Also the Committee questioned the 
figure, felt it should be higher. Selectman Ready ex- 
plained that the figure shown in the budget book was a 
1985 figure and that the 7% was retroactive, 5% for 
fiscal 1987, but because that was the 1985 figure in the 
book you have to add the 7% twice plus the 5% fiscal 
1987 increase, which is the increase that all Town 
Employees are receiving. 

A lengthy discussion followed. John Carson moved to 
table the Fire budget until after the Special Town 
Meeting. He withdrew his motion. William Keohane 
made a question to move the question. The Moderator 
asked if there was any need for further debate? Hearing 
none he asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend 
line article 32, which left the chair in doubt, he asked for 
a show of hands, motion carried. James Sousa Acting 
Chief of the Fire Department moved to amend line 33 
from $102,518. to $117,221. And to amend line 32 by ad- 
ding an additional amount of $115,425. which would be 
funding for five more men. The Board of Selectmen and 
the Finance Committee were against the two motions. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend line 33, motion defeated. He then asked for a 
voice vote on line 32, motion defeated. 

Elizabeth Marshall Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee, moved to amend the Assessors Department Budget 
Line item 7 to read $124,535. This new figure reflects a 
5% increase and not the 7% as requested. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 

The Moderator read the Board of Health budget. 
Elizabeth Marshall Chairman of the Finance Committee, 
moved to amend the Salaries Line Item 36 to read 
$102,228. The purpose was due to the salaries reflecting a 
7% increase instead of a 5%. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, which left the chair in doubt, a show of hands 
was taken, and the Moderator was still in doubt. The 
following tellers came forward to conduct a hand count: 



Jack Peters 
Norman LeBrecque 
John Warren 
Jacob Sartz 
Estelle Decker 
Harry Foster 



Edward Hilliard 
Donald Elias 
Jocelyn Anthony 
Walter Mellon 
Connie Fabien 



Hand count result Yes 69, No 210 Motion Defeated. 

The Moderator read from the Highway Department 
through the Law Department, Under the Library 
Department a discussion took place: 

Susan Cantin, Chairman of the Library Trustees, 
moved to amend Line Item 61. Books and Periodicals to 



read $96,450. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the motion to amend. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion, motion 
carried, unanimously. The Moderator read the 
Moderator's budget and Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School Budget. Under the Park budget a discussion took 
place. Norman LeBrecque moved to amend Line Item 67 
Expenses to read 9,446. He explained this $3,000. in- 
crease was to be used to maintain the soccer fields during 
the soccer season. The Finance Committee was in favor of 
the motion to amend. The Selectmen were not. Donald 
Ayers spoke in favor. Donald Gray Superintendent of 
Parks said that the department would be willing to main- 
tain the fields. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator read from the Personnel Board budget 
through Public Buildings. Under the Recreation Com- 
mission budget, Selectmen Emerson moved to amend 
Line Item 82 Salaries to read $33,529. and Line Item 84 
Expenses to read $17,780 for a total of $55,689. He said 
the increase was for the increase of cost for running the 
summer programs. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
which left the chair in doubt and asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried. 

The Moderator read from the Registrars Department 
through the Town Celebration Committee budget. 
Under Town Clerk Department a discussion took place. 
Elizabeth Marshall, Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee, moved to amend the Salaries Line Item 102 to read 
$92,492. This figure reflects the 5% increase and not the 
7% as requested. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to amend, motion carried. 

The Moderator read the Town Engineering Depart- 
ment. Under the Treasurer/Collector Department a 
discussion took place. Elizabeth Marshall, Chairman of 
the Finance Committee, moved to amend the Salaries 
Line Item 109 to read $144,611. Treasurer James 
Doukszewicz moved to amend the amendment to a figure 
of $146,347. which would include the longevity for his 
Assistant Treasurer, plus a 2% increase and one step 
which was approved by the Personnel Board. David 
McLachlan of the Finance Committee asked if the 
Treasurer had included a figure for longevity for himself 
within this amended figure, and the reply was yes. The 
Finance Committee wanted the Town Meeting Body to 
be aware of this, and that they were not in favor of 
elected officials receiving longevity. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to amend the motion (the 
figure of $146,347) motion defeated. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend (the figure 
of $144,611) which left the chair in doubt, the Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. The 
Moderator explained that the figure which will be voted 
on at the end of article 6 will be $145,866. 

The Moderator read from the Tree Warden Depart- 
ment through the Unclassified Department Budget. The 
Moderator asked for any more discussion on article 6. 
Norman LeBrecque moved to adjourn the meeting until 
May 5th, at that time a total figure for the whole of arti- 



50 



cle 6 could be given. The Finance Committee was in favor 
of the motion. The Board of Selectman were not. It was 
explained by the Moderator that if adjournment took 
place then all the figures could be brought back again for 
discussion. If a total figure is voted and the meeting ad- 
journed then the budget figures could not be brought 
back up for discussion. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to adjourn, motion defeated. The 
Moderator then read the final figure for the total of all 
the budgets in article 6: $33,091,309.00 will be needed to 
be raised and appropriated. A discussion took place con- 
cerning the final figure. William Dalton made a motion 
to move the question. The Moderator asked if there was 
any need for further discussion. Haring none, he asked 
for a voice vote on the figure of $33,091,309.00, motion 
carried. William Dalton moved to adjourn the meeting 
until Monday May 5th, 1986 to the McCarthy Jr. High 
Gymnasium. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried, the meeting adjourned at 11:05 PM. Article 
6 reads as follows: 

James Doukszewicz, Town Treasurer, moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$33,091,309.00 to defray Town charges for the fiscal 
period from July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1987. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

16. Salaries 

1 7 . Expenses 



5,050 
6,210 







Approved 


Departmental Budgets FY 1987 


Appropriations 


ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 






1. Salaries 




$ 87,345 


2 . Expenses 




1,900 


3. Outlay 




600 


TOTAL ACCOUNTING DEPT. 




89,845 


ANIMAL INSPECTORS DEPARTMENT 




4. Inspectors Salary 




1,000 


5 . Expense 




400 



TOTAL ANIMAL INSPECTORS DEPT. 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

6. Expenses 

ASSESSORS DEPARTMENT 



1,400 



5,460 



7. Salaries 


124,535 


8. Expenses 


50,000 


9. Outlay 


1 


10. Legal Services 


5,000 


1 1 . Revaluation Update 


37,500 


TOTAL ASSESSORS DEPT. 


217,036 


CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 




12. Salaries 


127,257 


1 3 . Expenses 


24,388 


14. Out of State 


500 


15. Outlay 


1,000 


TOTAL 


153,145 


TRANSFER FROM P/C INT 


15,000 


NET COST CEMETERY DEPT. 


138,145 



TOTAL CONSERVATION COMMISSION 


11,260 


CONSTABLE 




18. Salary 


150 


COUNCIL ON AGING/TOWN AIDE 




19. Salaries 


63,698 


20. Expenses 


29,190 



TOTAL COA/TOWN AIDE 

DEBT AND INTEREST: 
PRINCIPAL PAYMENTS: 

Junior High School 

Westland & Harrington Elem School 

Byam Elem School 

School Building Capital Improv. #3 

School Building Capital Improv. #4 

School Building Capital Improv. #5 

School Building Capital Improv. #6 

School Computer Purchase #2 

Sewerage— Plans & Design 

21. Total Principal 

INTEREST PAYMENTS: 

Anticipation of Revenue and 

Other Temp Loans 
Junior High School 
Westland & Harrington Elem School 
Byam Elem School 
School Building Capital Improv. #3 
School Building Capital Improv. #4 
School Building Capital Improv. #5 
School Building Capital Improv. #6 
School Computer Purchase #2 
Sewerage — Plans & Design 

22. Total Interest 

TOTAL DEBT AND INTEREST 

DOG OFFICER 

23. Salaries 

24. Expenses 

25. Pound Rental 

26. Care of Live Animals 
TOTAL DOG OFFICER 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

27. Expenses 

ELECTIONS 

28. Wages and Expenses 



92,888 






155,000 


100,000 











540,150 





100,000 



895,150 



240,000 



9,675 

21,000 




84,325 


37,000 



392,000 



1,287,150 



25,385 
2,000 
6,000 
1,200 

34,585 



1,000 



28,549 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 

(Previously Known as Civilian Defense) 

29. Expenses 2,040 

30. Outlay 1,026 

TOTAL 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 3,066 



51 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

31. Expenses 



2,000 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

32. Salaries 

33. Expenses 

34. Out of State 

35. Outlay 


2,356,865 
102,518 

1 
7,685 


TOTAL FIRE DEPT. 
APPROPRIATION FROM REVENUE 
SHARING FOR SALARIES 


2,467,069 
100,000 


NET COST FIRE DEPT. 


2,367,069 


HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

36. Salaries 

37. Expenses 

38. Outlay 

39. Out of State 

40. Mosquito Control 


103,260 

14,050 

1 

1 

10,000 


TOTAL HEALTH DEPT. 


127,312 


HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

41. Salaries 

42. Expenses 

43. Snow and Ice 


576,094 
426,494 
270,000 


TOTAL HIGHWAY DEPT. 

REVENUE SHARING APPROPRIATION 


1,272,588 



NET COST HIGHWAY DEPT. 


1,272,588 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

44. Expenses 

HYDRANT SERVICE 

45. Center 

46. North 

47. East 

48. South 

TOTAL HYDRANT SERVICE 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 

49. Superintendents Salary 

50. Expenses 

TOTAL INSECT PEST CONTROL 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

51. Salaries 

52. Expenses 

53. Out of State 

54. Outlay 

TOTAL INSPECTION DEPT 

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

Property Liability and All Types 
Chapter 32B 

55. Total Insurance Dept. 

LAW DEPARTMENT 

56. Town Counsel 

57. Legal Services 

58. Misc. Expense- Assoc Dues 
TOTAL LAW DEPT. 



1,000 



52,600 

19,300 

7,000 





78,900 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

59. Salaries 

60. Expenses 

61 . Books and Periodicals 

62. Outlay 

63. Out of State 
TOTAL LIBRARY DEPT. 
LESS STATE AID 

NET COST LIBRARY DEPT. 

MODERATOR 

64. Salary 



380,750 

73,711 

96,450 

1,437 

450 

552,798 

15,587 

537,211 



300 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECH HIGH SCHOOL 

65. Assessment 618,431 



PART DEPARTMENT 

66. Salaries 

67. Expenses 

68. Outlay 
TOTAL PARK DEPT. 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

69. Expenses 

PLANNING BOARD 

70. Expenses 

71. Outlay 

TOTAL PLANNING BOARD 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

72. Salaries 

73. Expenses 

74. Chiefs Out of State 

75. Outlay 

76. Auxiliary — Expense 

77. Auxiliary— Outlay 

TOTAL POLICE DEPARTMENT 
APPROPRIATION FROM REVENUE 
SHARING FOR SALARIES 



35,231 
9,446 

1 



44,678 



650 



17,577 
1 



17,578 



1,955,166 

199,148 

1,050 

1 

3,070 

400 

2,158,835 
100,000 



1,250 


NET COST POLICE DEPT. 


2,058,835 


10,800 






12,050 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS 






78. Salaries 


53,178 


131,192 
15,502 


79. Expenses 

80. Supervision Fee 

81. Outlay 


58,930 
7,000 
2,000 


500 






1 


TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 


121,108 


147,195 


RECREATION COMMISSION 






82. Salaries 


37,909 


577,216 
1,022,614 


83. Expenses 

84. Outlay 


17,780 



1,599,830 


TOTAL RECREATION COMMISSION 


55,689 


500 






50,000 






750 







51,250 



52 



REGISTRARS DEPARTMENT 

85. Salaries 

86. Expenses 

87. Outlay 

TOTAL REGISTRARS DEPT. 



VARNEY PLAYGROUND 

21,105 115. Labor- Part-time 

9,242 116. Expenses 

1 117. Outlay 

30,348 TOTAL VARNEY PLAYGROUND 



3,150 

1,999 

1 



5,150 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



88. Budget FY 1987 


18,874,726 


SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 




89. Salary 


2,100 


90. Expenses 


300 


TOTAL SEALER DEPT. 


2,400 


SELECTMENS DEPARTMENT 




91. Salaries 


90,725 


92. Expenses 


14,800 


93. Outlay 


1,500 


94. Out of State 


500 


TOTAL SELECTMENS DEPT. 


107,525 


SEWER COMMISSION 




95. Salaries 


37,160 


96. Expenses 


25,400 


97. Professional Fees 


50,000 


98. Outlay 


1 


99. Out of State 


5,000 



168,000 



500 



92.492 

5,605 

410 



TOTAL SEWER COMMISSION 117,561 

STREET LIGHTING 

100. Expense 

TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

101. Expense 

TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 

102. Salaries 

103. Expenses 

104. Outlay 
TOTAL TOWN CLERK DEPT. 98,705 

TOWN ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

105. Salaries 

106. Expenses 

107. Outlay 

108. Out of State 
TOTAL ENGINEERING DEPT. 73,605 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR DEPARTMENT 

109. Salaries 145,866 

110. Expenses 26,618 

111. Outlay 800 

TOTAL TREASURER/COLLECTOR 



68,013 


5,590 


1 


1 



TREE WARDEN DEPARTMENT 

112. Salaries 

113. Expense 

114. Outlay 

TOTAL TREE WARDEN DEPT. 



173,284 



1,000 
13,875 
1 

14,876 



101,044 



1,200,000 



VETERANS BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 

118. Salaries 43,893 

119. Expenses 4,150 

120. Outlay 1 

121. Cash & Material Grants 53,000 
TOTAL VETERANS BENEFITS 

WASTE COLLECTION 

122. Expense 

UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT 

123. Ambulance Service 

124. Cable TV Commission 

125. Clerk of Committees 

126. County Retirement Assessment 

127. Cultural Council 

128. Elder Services of Mer Valley 

129. Historic District Com 

130. Lowell Mental Health 

131. Medical Bills Retired Police 

and Fire Chap. 41 Sec. 100B 

132. Memorial Day Expense 

133. Mobil Home Rent Control Bd. 

134. NM AC Assessment 

135. Police Mutual Aid - LEAA 

136. Preliminary Project Studies 

137. Town Clock Expense 

138. Town & Fin Com Reports 

139. Unemployment Benefits — State 

140. Veterans Pension Claims 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED DEPT. 

TOTAL GROSS APPROPRIATIONS 

LESS: TRANSFERS 

RAISE AND APPROPRIATE 





3,100 



999,549 

100 

1,800 

1,000 

9,000 

10,000 

1,000 
250 
9,000 
2,000 
1 
600 
5,800 
50,000 
6,375 
1,099,575 

33,321,896 

230,587 

33,091,309 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 5, 1986 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at the McCarthy Jr. High Gymnasium at 7:45 PM 
by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 241 voters present. 

Ther Moderator explained briefly the Town Meeting 
rules of order. 

Elizabeth Marshall, Chairman of the Finance Commit- 



53 



tee, moved to take Article 21 out of order. The Finance 
Committee felt it was important for the Town Meeting 
Body to know where the Town stood financially at this 
point in time before any more money articles are acted 
upon. The Board of Selectmen were against taking the 
article out of order. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried. Selectman Ready moved to post- 
pone article 21 until the first order of business on May 
12th. The Finance Committee was against postpone- 
ment. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to postpone, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Selectman Dennis Ready 
moved that the town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $194,760.00 to appropriate salary lines items to 
fund approved wage and salary increases and expense 
allocations in the following departmental accounts: 



Line Item 32. Fire Department 
Salary Account: 

Line Item 33. Fire Department 
Expense Account 



$173,743.00 



4,725.00 



Accountint Department 




1. Salaries 


1,737.00 


Assessors Department 




7. Salaries 


617.00 


Cemetery Department 




12. Salaries 


1,716.00 


Council on Aging/Town Aide 




19. Salaries 


965.00 


Highway Department 




41. Salaries 


5,019.00 


Inspection Department 




51. Salaries 


429.00 


Library Department 




59. Salaries 


2,378.00 


Park Department 




66. Salaries 


1,716.00 


Selectmen Department 




91. Salaries 


289.00 


Town Clerk Department 




102. Salaries 


650.00 


Veteran's Benefit Department 




118. Salaries 


776.00 


TOTAL 


$194,760.00 



Selectman Ready explained that these are the figures 
needed to fund the budgets as a result of the action taken 
under article 2 and article 6. 

Elizabeth Marshall, Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee, spoke about the cost of the article and the impact it 
will have on the other money warrant articles. She ques- 
tioned where the funding was to come from. There could 
be a possibility of cutting back the Fire Department or 
other alternatives. 

William Dalton speaking on behalf of the Fire Depart- 
ment's union personnel, explained that they have been 
negotiating for over one year and that the contract was 
signed and voted on, and felt that the Fire Department 



was being used as a scapegoat at this point. None of the 
other budgets where raises were given were being used as 
examples. A lengthy discussion took place. William 
Dalton moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion which left 
the chair in doubt. The following tellers came forward 
and a hand count was taken: 



Donald Elias 
Norman LaBrecque 
Estelle Decker 
Jocelyn Anthony 
Jacob Sartz 



Thomas Gazda 
Harry Foster 
John Warren 
Jean Horgan 
Jack Peters 



Result of the hand count Yes 132, No 41, %'s vote re- 
quired, 116 needed motion carried. The Moderator then 
asked for a voice vote on article 21 , which left the chair in 
doubt, the tellers came forward and conducted a hand 
count. Result: Yes 116, No 71, motion carried. 

Elizabeth Marshall, Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee, moved to recess the meeting for a short period of time 
for the purpose of re-establishing the Town's financial 
position. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried. The meeting recessed at 8:45 PM. 

The Moderator re-convened the meeting at 9:00 PM. 
Elizabeth Marshall, Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee, moved to reconsider article 21. The Committee felt 
that the up-coming money articles could be cut, then the 
financial status would be all right, however if they are 
voted along with everything else that has been voted 
upon, the Town will be $84,060.00 in deficit. A discus- 
sion took place. William Dalton spoke against the motion 
to reconsider and made a motion to move the question. 
The Moderator asked if there was any need for further 
debate. Hearing none he asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to reconsider, motion defeated. George Ripsom 
of the Finance Committee, questioned the voice vote. 
The tellers came forward and conducted a hand count. 
Result: Yes 69, No 111, motion to reconsider defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 James R. Doukszewicz, Town 
Treasurer, moved to see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in an- 
ticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
July 1, 1986: in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in ac- 
cordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17 and 
17 (a). 

The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee 
recommend the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 



William Dalton moved to adjourn the meeting until 
Monday May 12, 1986. He felt that this would give the 
Finance Committee and the Selectmen time to review the 
remaining money articles. Both the Board of Selectmen 
and Finance Committee were against the motion. The 
Selectmen wanted to go ahead and make a decision on 



54 



the non-money articles. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion defeated to adjourn. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 James R. Doukszewicz, Town 
Treasurer, moved that the Town vote to request the 
Department of Revenue, Division of Accounts of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to make an audit of all 
accounts in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommend the article. Motion carried, unanimously by 
voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Elizabeth Marshall, Chairman of 
the Finance Committee moved to postpone the article un- 
til the completion of the Special Town Meeting schedule 
for May 12th. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 The Selectmen stated that this 
article was to be dismissed due to no previous bills. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 1 Peter Dulchinos, Chairman of 
the Board of Health, moved to table this article until 
another time within the Town Meeting. Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 John P. Emerson Jr. Chairman 
of the Sewer Commission moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer Com- 
missioners to acquire any and all temporary and/or per- 
manent easements, and any property in fee simple with 
the buildings and trees thereon by purchase, eminent do- 
main, or otherwise, for the property located in the Town 
of Chelmsford Massachusetts, and further described and 
shown on a set of plans, entitled Plan of Sewer Easement 
in Chelmsford Massachusetts, North Interceptor Sewer, 
prepared for the Chelmsford Sewer Commission, Febru- 
ary, 1986, scale 1 inch = 40 feet, by Howe surveying, and 
a plan entitled "Subdivision of Land in Chelmsford 
1 " = 40 ' dated December 11, 1985, Prepared by William 
G. Troy", copies of which are on file in the office of the 
Town Engineer and are incorporated herewith, for the 
purpose of constructing and maintaining sewers, pump- 
ing stations, and all other appurtenances thereto said 
funds to be expended from the sale of Bonds and/or notes 
authorized from Articles 31 from the Annual Town 
Meeting of 1984. 

Selectman Emerson explained that there was no money 
involved, just a vote of approval needed. The Finance 
Committee recommend. A %'s vote was required. A 
voice vote was taken, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Emerson stated that 
the monies required for this article would be bonded, and 
asked James Doukszewicz to explain. James Doukszewicz 
moved to amend the article by updating the amounts 
shown. He explained that since the article was drawn up 
amounts changed, and before Town Meeting action was 
to take place an amendment was required. Under 
Cemetery dept, roof for maint. bldg. $26,600. Under 
highway dept. 4 whl.dr dump trucks (2-1 ton) 47,000. 
Under highway dept diesel dump trucks (2) $93,000. and 



under highway dept. grader add and plow. He explained 
that the departments had to stay within the amount re- 
quested because of the bonding issue. If the required 
work or equipment needed was more than the request, 
then the department would not be able to have the equip- 
ment of work done. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator pro- 
ceeded on with Article 14 and took a vote. Mary St. 
Hilaire, Town Clerk informed the Moderator that a final 
vote was not taken on Article 13, just the motion to 
amend. The Moderator made a point of order and 
returned to Article 13 and asked for a voice vote on the 
main motion as amended. The motion carried, unani- 
mously, and the article reads as follows: 

Selectmen John P. Emerson moved that the town vote 
to appropriate the sum of $2,295,520.00 for the following 
capital projects: 



landfill closure costs 

police dept. communications system 

police dept. stainless steel toilets (6) 

police dept. smoke detectors/lights 
(cells) 

police dept. elec. breathilizer 

police dept. new cruisers (5) 

bldg. inspctn. microfilm 
reader/ printer 

cemetery dept. roof for maint. bldg. 

cemetery dept. % ton pick-up truck 

park dept. % ton pick-up truck 

pubic, bldgs. stairway from lower pkg. 
lot to upper lot — Town Office Bldg. 

pubic, bldgs. carpeting for Town Ofc. 



fire dept. rescue truck 

fire dept. auto, generator for sta. #01 

fire dept. portable foam 

fire dept. hazardous waste materials — 
equipment and training 

recreation dept. So. Row outfield 
rehab. 

highway dept. drainage work projects 

highway dept. road resurfacing projects 

highway dept. diesel dump trucks (2) 

highway dept. 4 whl. dr. dump trucks 
(2-1 ton) 

highway dept. grader and plow 

sewer commission drainage work 

library dept. ports/printers — (2) CLSI 
terminals 



$450,000.00 
$125,000.00 
$ 6,000.00 

$ 5,000.00 
$ 5,000.00 
$ 60,000.00 

$ 13,000.00 

$ 26,600.00 

$ 12,000.00 

$ 11,000.00 

$ 8,000.00 

$ 29,200.00 

$ 80,000.00 
$ 20,000.00 
$ 7,000.00 

$ 20,000.00 

$ 5,000.00 
$163,000.00 
$355,300.00 
$ 93,000.00 

$ 47,000.00 
$104,000.00 
$250,000.00 

5,520.00 



55 



school dept. roof coating— McCarthy 

roofs $ 15,000.00 

school dept. student furn. replacement 

-500 units-elem. schls. $ 37,500.00 

school dept. bus. educ. terminals (18) $ 22,500.00 

school dept. sidewalk repairs/ voting 

ramps $ 40,000.00 

school dept. So. Row windows glazed $ 10,000.00 

school dept. So. Row playground 

surface rehabilitation $ 22,000.00 

school dept. (3 Schls) panic hdwre. 

replcd. $ 28,000.00 

schl. dept. bleacher rplcmt. (section) — 

McCarthy field $ 7,500.00 

schl. dept. walkways resurfaced $ 30,000.00 

schl. dept. Westland playground 

rehab. $ 4,000.00 

school dept. T-V equipment $ 15,000.00 

schl. dept. high schl. track rehab. $100,000.00 

schl. dept. high schl. carpeting $ 16,000.00 

schl. dept. high schl. painting $ 10,000.00 

schl. dept. high schl. (Lexan glass 

replaced) $ 5,000.00 

accounting dept. computer 

hdwr./sftwre. $ 32,400.00 

and that to meet these appropriations, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to bor- 
row $2,295,520.00 under G.L.ch 44 section 7. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Charlott DeWolf, Chairman of 
the Cemetery Commission, moved that the town vote to 
transfer the sum of $15,000.00 from the Sale of Graves 
and Lots to the Improvement and Development Fund of 
the Cemetery Department. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Chairman of the Board of 
Health, Peter Dulchinos, moved that the Town vote to 
amend to the General By-Laws, Article VII 
Miscellaneous, by adding the following: 

Section II. Discharge of subsurface material and 
storage of fuels, substances, etc., within 1200 feet of 
wells. 

1. Definitions 



In this By-Law, the following terms have the follow- 
ing meaning; 

(a) Subsurface material: any substance defined as 
(1) a Hazardous waste by any federal or state 
agency; by any Federal or State regulation, or 
pursuant to Article X of the Town of Chelms- 
ford General By-Laws. (2) Septic wastes, 



whether or not pretreated, and (3) Industrial 
waster, (4) and/or any other material found to 
be hazardous and/or dangerous to the public 
health, welfare and safety and/or environ- 
ment, by the Board of Health. 

(b) Discharge: The Discharge, deposit, injection, 
dumping, spilling, leaking, incineration, or 
placing of substance materials below any sur- 
face. 

(c) Storage: The actual or intended containment 
of subsurface materials. 

2. No subsurface material shall be discharged or 
stored within 1200 feet of any wells located within 
the Town, if said wells supply the inhabitants of the 
Town with water, whether through an established 
Water District or municipal wells. 

3. No fuels or subsurface material shall be stored 
within 1200 feet of any wells located within the 
Town, if said wells supply the inhabitants of the 
Town with water, whether through an established 
Water District or Municipal Wells. 

4. Enforcement. 

The Board of Health or its Enforcement Officer 
may, according to law, enter upon any premises at 
any reasonable time to inspect for compliance with 
the provisions of this By-Law. Upon demand by the 
owner or person in control of the premises, 
however, the Board of Health or its Enforcement 
Officer shall obtain a warrant authorizing such en- 
try and inspection. Information necessary to 
demonstrate compliance shall be submitted by the 
occupant of the premises at the request of the 
Board of Health or its Enforcement Officer. If re- 
quested, samples of subsurfaces materials and/or 
materials stored shall be provided to the Board of 
Health or its Enforcement Officer for testing. All 
records pertaining to said materials, disposal and 
removal shall be retained for no less than five years, 
and shall be made available for review within 48 
hours of a request. 

5. Violation. 

Upon determination by the Board of Health of a 
violation of this By-Law, the Board may issue such 
order as it deems appropriate to remedy the viola- 
tion. The order may include a compliance schedule 
for those activities which the Board of Health 
deems reasonably necessary to abate the violation. 

6. The Planning Board, Board of Appeals and 
Building Inspector shall be prohibited from issuing 
any special permits variances or building permits in 
contravention of this By-Law and any said permits 
shall be deemed null and void. 



56 



7. Penalty. 

Violation of this By-Law shall be punishable by a 
fine of $300.00 for each offense. Each day that such 
violation continues shall constitute a separate of- 
fense. 

8. Severability. 

It is hereby declared that the provisions of this By- 
Law are severable, and if any provisions of this By- 
Law shall be declared unlawful by a valid judgment 
or decree of any court of competent jurisdiction, 
such invalidity shall not affect any of the remaining 
provisions of this By-Law. 

The Board of Health asked for support of the article 
from the Town Meeting body. The Selectman and 
Finance Committee recommended the article. Richard 
O'Neil wanted to amend the article to read residential 
wells, but this was ruled out of order by Town Counsel 
James Harrington, The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
General Law, Chapter 44, Section 53E. 

Selectman Emerson explained that this was to be used 
by Departments for their own receipts so they could apply 
the monies towards their own operating expenses. Before 
they can do this they must get Town Meeting approval to 
set up the revolving account. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By- 
Laws, Article VII — Miscellaneous, by deleting Section 1. 
Dog Leash Law, and Section 8. Licensing of Dogs, by 
deleting said sections in their entirety, and substituting 
the following in their place. 

Section I. Regulation of Dogs 

1. Reference to Massachusetts General Laws. 

Any reference to a "Section number" in this By- 
Law shall mean Chapter 140 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, unless otherwise stated. 

2. Definitions. 

Unless otherwise set out in this By-Law, any term 
defined in Section 136A, shall have the same mean- 
ing in this By-Law, and shall be expressly incor- 
porated herein. 

OWNER — Owner shall be intended to mean any 
person or persons, firm, association or corporation 
owning, keeping or harboring a dog owned or kept 
in the Town. 



AT LARGE — At Large shall be intended to mean 
off the premises of the owner, and not under the 
control of the owner or authorized escort either by 
leash, cord, chain, or otherwise. 

LICENSE PERIOD -The license period shall be 
from January 1 of each year to December 31 of the 
same year. 

3. Registration and Licenses. 

(a) A person who at the commencement of a 
license period is, or who during any license 
period becomes, the owner or keeper of a dog 
three months old or over which is not duly 
licensed, and the owner or keeper of a dog 
three months old or over which is not duly 
licensed, and the owner or keeper of a dog 
when it becomes three months old during a 
license period, shall cause it to be registered, 
numbered, described and licensed until the 
end of such license period, and the owner or 
keeper of a dog so registered, numbered, 
described and licensed during any license 
period, in order to own or keep such dog after 
the beginning of the succeeding license period, 
shall, before the beginning thereof, cause it to 
be registered, numbered, described and licens- 
ed for such period. The registering, number- 
ing, describing and licensing of a dog shall be 
done in the office of the Town Clerk on a form 
prescribed and supplied by the Town Clerk, 
and shall be subject to the condition expressed 
therein that the dog which is subject of the 
license shall be controlled and restrained from 
killing, chasing or harassing live stock or fowls. 

The Town Clerk shall not grant such license for 
any dog unless the owner thereof provides the 
Town Clerk with either a veterinarian's cer- 
tification that such dog has been vaccinated in 
accordance with the provisions of Section 145 B 
or has been certified exempt from such provi- 
sion as outlined in Section 137 or 137A, or a 
notarized letter from a veterinarian that a cer- 
tificate was issued or a metal rabies tag bearing 
an expiration date indicating that such cer- 
tification is still in effect. 

The Owner or keeper of a licensed dog shall 
cause it to wear around its neck or body a collar 
or harness of leather or other suitable material, 
to which shall be securely attached a tag in a 
form prescribed by and issued by the Town 
Clerk when a license is issued. Such tag shall 
state the following: (a) Town of Chelmsford, 
(b) Year of issue, and (c) tag number. If any 
such tag shall be lost, the owner or keeper of 
such dog shall forthwith secure a substitute tag 
from the Town Clerk at a cost of one dollar. 
This section shall not apply where it is other- 
wise provided by law, nor shall it apply to a 
person having a kennel license. 



57 



(b) The provisions of Section 138 and 138A shall 
be expressly incorporated under this By-Law. 

(c) A license duly recorded shall be valid 
throughout the commonwealth, except that, in 
the case of the permanent moving of a dog into 
the town, the owner or keeper thereof shall, 
within thirty days after such moving, present 
the original license and tag of such dog to the 
Town Clerk and said Town Clerk shall take up 
the same and issue to said owner or keeper a 
transfer license, together with a tag, for such 
dog upon payment of one dollar. The provi- 
sions of this By-Law relative to the form and 
furnishing of licenses and tags shall apply to 
licenses and tags issued under this paragraph. 

4. KENNEL LICENSE 

(a) Any person maintaining a kennel shall have a 
kennel license. 



137C. Any person maintaining a kennel after 
the license therefor has been so revoked, or 
while such license is so suspended, shall be 
punished as set forth in section 18 of this By- 
Law. The selectmen may in the case of any 
suspension, reinstate such license. 

(e) The provisions of Section 137D A shall be ex- 
pressly incorporated under this By-Law. 

5. LICENSE FEES 

The fee for every dog licensed shall be as follows: 

Four Dollars ($4.00) for every neutered male dog. 
Four Dollars ($4.00) for every spayed female dog. 
Seven Dollars ($7.00) for every male and female dog. 

Determination of licensing eligibility, dogs not re- 
quired to be licensed, or refunding license fees, 
shall be determined as set out in Section 139. 



(b) Any person who meets any requirement of the 
Town of Chelmsford By-Laws, and Section 
137 A, may obtain a Kennel License from the 
Town Clerk on a form prescribed and supplied 
by the Town Clerk and for a fee as set out in 
Section 5 of this By-Law. The Town Clerk shall 
upon application issue without charge a kennel 
license to any domestic charitable corporation 
incorporated exclusively for the purpose of pro- 
tecting animals from cruelty, neglect or abuse 
and for the relief of suffering among animals. 

(c) The provisions of Section 137B shall be ex- 
pressly incorporated under this By-Law. 

(d) The Chief of police or dog officer may at any 
time inspect or cause to be inspected any ken- 
nel and if, in their or his judgement, the same 
is not being maintained in a sanitary and 
humane manner, or if records are not properly 
kept as required by law, shall file with the 
selectmen a petition setting forth the facts, and 
the selectmen shall upon this petition, or upon 
a petition of twenty-five citizens, setting forth 
that they are aggrieved, or annoyed to an un- 
reasonable extent, by one or more dogs at a 
kennel maintained in town, because of ex- 
cessive barking or vicious disposition of said 
dogs or other conditions connected with such 
kennel constituting a public nuisance, said 
selectman, within seven days after the filing of 
such petition, shall give notice to all parties in 
interest of a public hearing to be held within 
fourteen days after the date of such notice. 
Within seven days after such public hearing 
said selectmen shall make an order either 
revoking or suspending such kennel license or 
otherwise regulating said kennel, or dismissing 
said petition. Within ten days after such order 
the holder of such license may bring a petition 
in the district court as outlined in Section 



The fee for every kennel license shall be as follows: 

Ten Dollars ($10.00) for every kennel license for 

4 dogs or less 

Twenty-five Dollars ($25. 00)for every kennel license for 
over 4 but not over 10 
dogs. 

Fifty Dollars ($50.00) for every kennel license for 

over 10 dogs. 

All the fees shall be increased by Five Dollars 
($5.00) on the first day of the second month follow- 
ing the required licensing period, as outlined in sec- 
tion 3 (a) of this By-Law, and by an additional Five 
Dollars ($5.00) on the first day of each succeeding 
month. 

6. DOG OFFICER 

The Board of Selectmen shall annually appoint a 
dog officer and as many assistant dog officers as 
said board determines necessary to enforce this By- 
Law and, said individual(s) shall enforce this By- 
Law and perform such other duties as the selectmen 
may determine. The selectmen shall determine 
hours and conditions of work for the dog officers. 
Compensation for persons appointed under this By- 
Law shall be consistent with other By-Laws dealing 
with salaries of appointed officials. 

The provisions of Section 151 and 151 A regarding 
killing and or transfer of and dogs shall apply and 
are expressly incorporated in this By-Law. No dog 
officer shall be a licensed animal dealer registered 
with the United States Department of Agriculture, 
and no dog officer, either privately or in the course 
of carrying out his official assignments as an agent 
for this town, or shall any other agent of the town, 
give, sell, or turn over any animal which may come 
into his custody to any business or institution licens- 



58 



ed or registered as a research facility or animal 
dealer with the United States Department of 
Agriculture Whoever violates the provisions of this 
paragraph shall be punished as provided in Section 
151. 

7. LEASH LAW 

No owner or keeper of any dog shall permit such 
dog to run at large at anytime. The provisions of 
this section shall not be intended to apply to dogs 
participating in any dog show, nor to "seeing-eye" 
dogs properly trained to assist blind persons for the 
purpose of aiding them in going from place to 
place, nor to any dogs properly trained and under 
control of and aiding the deaf, nor to any dogs be- 
ing trained or actually being used for hunting pur- 
poses. 

Nothing contained in the foregoing paragraph shall 
prevent the Selectmen from passing any orders 
authorized ■ by Massachusetts General Laws or by 
Section 167 at such times as they shall deem it 
necessary to safeguard the public. 

Every owner or keeper of a dog shall exercise proper 
care and control of their dog so as to prevent said 
dog from becoming a public nuisance. It shall be 
deemed a public nuisance if any dog should trespass 
upon public or private property and deposit feces 
thereon, unless said feces are immediately removed 
by the owner or keeper of said dog. 

8. CONFINEMENT ETC., OF DOGS 

The dog officer shall seek out, catch and confine all 
dogs within the town that have not been licensed 
within 60 days of the time the dog is required to be 
licensed under this By-Law; and shall seek out, 
catch and confine any dogs within the town that are 
found on public property, or on private property 
where said dog is trespassing 1 and the owner or per- 
son in control of such property wants the dog 
removed, said dogs being in violation of this re- 
quirement of this By-Law; and shall seek out, catch 
and confine any dog within the town when said dog 
was cited for a violation of any provision of this By- 
Law, and the owner or keeper has failed within 21 
days to avail himself to Section 16 or 17 of this By- 
Law, or within 21 days of a determination by the 
court under the provisions of Article 1 , Section 2 of 
the Town of Chelmsford General By-Laws that any 
sums are due, and has failed to pay said sums. 

Any owner or keeper of any dog who refuses to turn 
over any dog to the dog officer upon demand, said 
seeking out, catching or confinement authorized in 
the paragraph above, shall be punished by a fine of 
One Hundred Dollars ($100). Each day that said 
violation continues shall constitute a separate of- 
fense. 



9. DISPOSITION OF DOGS 

Any dog confined by the dog officer, unless picked 
up by the owner, shall be kept for at least 10 days, 
at which time said dog may be disposed of in a 
manner determined by the Board of Selectmen, 
provided that at the end of 10 days, the dog officer 
may make available for adoption any male or any 
spayed female dog not found to be diseased. Any 
dog confined by the dog officer shall not be released 
to the owner until the owner produces evidence of a 
current dog license, and pays a sum of $10 per day 
for care of the animal, each day or part of a day 
counted as one day. For any dog adopted under this 
paragraph, a fee of $10 shall be charged, and said 
dog shall be licensed before adoption. Any fees in 
this paragraph are to be in addition to fees or fines 
as specified elsewhere in this By-Law and/or under 
Massachusetts General Laws. No dog shall be 
turned over or sold in any manner inconsistent with 
Section 151 or disposed of inconsistent with the pro- 
visions of 151A. 

10. EMERGENCY TREATMENT 

Any veterinarian registered under the provisions of 
section fifty-five or fifty-six A of chapter one hun- 
dred and twelve who provides emergency treatment 
of a dog or cat that is injured on any public way in 
Chelmsford shall receive in lieu of payment from 
the county dog fund as allowed in Section 151B, 
payment from the Dog Fund provided by under this 
By-Law. All other provisions of Section 151B shall 
be incorporated herein under this By-Law. 

11. DAMAGE CAUSED BY DOGS 

Whoever suffers loss in a manner described in Sec- 
tion 161 shall inform the dog officer of such loss, 
who shall investigate the circumstances of said loss. 
In the event it is found that the damage was caused 
by the dog officer is less than $50, he shall submit a 
report to the Board of Selectmen. If the estimate is 
over $50, he shall have the damage appraised on 
oath, by three persons, one person appointed by the 
dog officer, one appointed by the person alleged to 
be damaged, and one appointed by the other two. 
Said appraisers shall act as outlined in Section 161 
and turn in said appraisal to the Board of Select- 
men who may authorize payment, or make such in- 
dependent investigation as they think proper, and 
shall issue an order upon the Town Treasurer for 
any amount as they decide to be just and shall 
notify all interested parties of their decision. The 
appraisers shall receive payment from the town in a 
manner as is authorized in Section 161. All funds 
expended under this section shall come from the 
Dog Fund. 

The Selectmen may appoint a temporary investi- 
gator in any case that the board believes in its 
reasonable discretion requires further investigation, 



59 



and if said investigator believes that the evidence is 
sufficient to sustain an action against the owner or 
keeper of the dog, he shall recommend to the board 
of selectmen that said action be brought, unless the 
owner or keeper before action brought pays him 
such amount in settlement of the damages as he 
deems reasonable. After the recommendation of 
the investigator, the selectmen may order that ac- 
tion shall be brought in his own name or in the 
name of the Town of Chelmsford or both, as the 
selectmen, determine. 

If the Selectmen determine, after notice to parties 
interested and a hearing, who is the owner or 
keeper of any dog which is found to have worried, 
maimed or killed any live stock or fowls, thereby 
causing damages for which their owner may 
become entitled to compensation from the dog 
fund under this By-Law they shall serve upon the 
owner or keeper of such dog a notice directing him 
within twenty-four hours to kill or confine the dog. 
A person who owns or keeps a dog, and who has 
received such notice and does not within twenty- 
four hours kill such dog or thereafter keep it on his 
premises or under the immediate restraint and con- 
trol of some person, shall be punished as provided 
in Section 18 of this By-Law, and any police officer, 
constable or dog officer may kill such dog if it is 
found outside of the enclosure of its owner or 
keeper and not under his immediate care. 

The Board of Selectmen, or their agents thereto 
authorized in writing, may, after written notice to 
the owner or keeper, enter upon the premises of the 
owner or keeper, of any dog known to them to have 
worried or killed live stock or fowls, and then and 
there kill such dog, unless such owner or keeper 
whose premises are thus entered for the said pur- 
pose shall give a bond in the sum of two hundred 
dollars with sufficient sureties, approved by the 
Board of Selectmen conditioned that the dog shall 
be restrained for twelve months next ensuing. And 
if the owner or keeper of the dog declares his inten- 
tion to give such a bond, said Selectmen or their 
agents, shall allow him seven days, exclusive of Sun- 
days and holidays, in which to procure and prepare 
the same and to present it to them, or to file it with 
the Town Clerk. 

12. LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES 

The owner or keeper of a dog which has done 
damage to live stock or fowls shall be liable in tort 
to the town for all damages so done in which the 
Town has been requested to pay as provided by 
General Laws Chapter 140 or by this By-Law. Such 
action may be brought by the Board of Selectmen, 
or by a temporary investigator as authorized in Sec- 
tion 11 of this By-Law. 



13. REWARDS 

The provisions of Sections 162 regarding the 
rewards for killing a dog shall be incorporated 
herewith with said funds being paid from the Dog 
Fund. 

14. ORDERING DOGS TO BE MUZZLED 
OR RESTRAINED 

All the provisions of Section 167 shall be incor- 
porated into this By-Law except that any dog held 
under the provisions of Section 167 may not be 
released until all the requirements of this By-Law, 
regarding licensing and the fee for care of the 
animal, are complied with. All other provisions of 
Section 167 shall be incorporated herein. 

15. VIOLATIONS 

Any person authorized to enforce provisions of this 
By-Law shall in addition to any pickup of the dog 
pursuant to this By-Law, issue a citation to the 
owner or keeper of any dog violating the provisions 
of the Leash Law requirements of this By-Law. Any 
such citation shall include, in addition to the viola- 
tion charged, the name and address of the owner or 
keeper of the dog, the date and time and location of 
the alleged offense, and the amount of the penalty 
due, said citation shall be on a form prescribed by 
and furnished by the Town Clerk. 

16. INFORMAL DISPOSITION PROCESS 

The owner or keeper of the dog that receives a cita- 
tion under this By-Law, may within 21 days, con- 
fess to the offense charged by personally or through 
a duly authorized agent or by mailing to the Town 
Clerk, said citation along with payment in the 
amount as authorized under the PENALTY provi- 
sions of this By-Law. Said payment shall be by 
postal note, money order or check. The payment to 
the Town Clerk shall operate as a final disposition 
of the case. 

If such person when issued a citation desires to con- 
test the violation through the Informal Disposition 
Process, he may, within 21 days of said issuance, re- 
quest a hearing with the Town Clerk, or a hearing 
officer appointed by said clerk, and may present 
either in person or by counsel, any evidence he may 
have to refute the allegation contained in the cita- 
tion. At such hearing, the clerk or hearing officer 
shall make a determination as to facts of the allega- 
tion, and said determination shall be final regard- 
ing the informal disposition process. 

17. NON CRIMINAL DISPOSITION 
OF VIOLATION 

If any person so notified by citation desires to con- 
test the violation alleged in the citation notice 



60 



without availing themselves to the provisions of the 
informal process, or desires to contest the decision 
of the clerk or hearing officer, he may avail himself 
to the procedures established in Article 1 , Section 2 
or the Town of Chelmsford General By-Laws. In 
either of the above cases, or if the owner or keeper 
of a dog fails to respond to the citation within 21 
days, the Town Clerk shall forward a copy of the 
citation to the District Court where it shall be 
handled under the provisions of Article 1 , Section 2 
of the Town of Chelmsford General By-Laws. 

18. PENALTY 

(1) The following penalties, except where in- 
dicated herein shall be in effect for violations of 
the Leash Law provisions of this By-Law: 

(a) Informal Disposition Process 

1st Offense in calendar year $25 

2nd Offense in calendar year $50 
3rd or Subsequent Offense 

in calendar year $100 

(b) Non Criminal Disposition through Article 
1, Section 2, Town of Chelmsford General 
By-Laws. 

1st Offense in calendar year $50 

2nd Offense in calendar year $100 
3rd or Subsequent Offense 

in calendar year $150 

(2) Violation of Section 4, (d) of this By-Law shall 
be $50. 



tion of this fund by the Town Accountant. 

20. ANTI-RABIC VACCINE AND TREATMENT 

The Board of Health shall, upon application fur- 
nish free of charge to any resident who has been ex- 
posed to rabies, or may have been so exposed, anti- 
rabic vaccine and anti-rabic treatment, in accor- 
dance with rules and regulations which the Depart- 
ment of Public Health is authorized to make. Any 
resident shall have the right to select his own physi- 
cian, who shall be paid by the Town at a rate 
established by the Board of Health, and the fact 
that a physician is a member of the Board of Health 
shall not disqualify him from being so selected and 
from being paid by the town for his services. Reim- 
bursement for the cost of furnishing vaccine and 
treatment, not exceeding fifty dollars in the case of 
any one person, shall be made from the Dog Fund. 

21. DOG LISTINGS 

Persons authorized or directed by section four of 
chapter fifty-one or by any special law to make lists 
of persons three years of age or older shall make a 
list of all dogs owned by the inhabitants of the town 
at the time of making lists required under such sec- 
tion and return the same in duplicate to the Town 
Clerk on or before April first. An owner or keeper 
of a dog who refuses to answer or answers falsely to 
persons directed or authorized to make a list of the 
owners of dogs shall be punished by a fine of not less 
than ten dollars. 



(3) Penalties for violations of any other provision of 
this By-Law shall be $100. 

(4) Each day of all said violations shall constitute a 
separate offense. 

19. DOG FUND 

There shall be a dog fund established by the town 
under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53E of 
Massachusetts General Laws which shall be used to 
make purchases necessary to administer this By- 
Law and to pay any expenses relating to this By- 
Law or for any other costs that Massachusetts 
General Laws require to be paid from the county 
dog fund. Said fund shall be administered by the 
Town Accountant and may receive funds from 
usual municipal financing methods and from any 
fees or fines collected under this By-Law. The 
Board of Selectmen shall determine a maximum 
amount that shall stay in said fund, with all addi- 
tional funds being turned into the General Fund. 

The Board of Selectmen may determine certain 
salaries or expenses that may not be funded with 
this fund but must be appropriated through the 
usual municipal financing procedure, and such 
determination shall be binding on this administra- 



22. MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL LAWS 
INCORPORATED INTO THIS BY-LAW 

The provisions of the following sections of Chapter 
140 of Massachusetts General Laws shall be incor- 
porated into and apply to this By-Law; Section 
145B, 149, 155, 155A, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 
161A, 168, 174A, 174B, AND 174D. 

23. EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION DATE OF 
THIS BY-LAW 

This By-Law shall go into effect on December 31, 
1986, and until said date, all areas of Massachusetts 
General Laws and Sections 1, and 8 Article VIII — 
Miscellaneous of the Town of Chelmsford General 
By-Laws shall remain in effect. 

24. SEVERABILITY CLAUSE 

If any part, section or provision of this By-Law is 
found to be invalid, the remainder of this By-Law 
shall not be affected thereby; and I move that the 
Town vote to transfer and appropriate the sum of 
$1,000.00, from Dog Officer receipts, to fund the 
aforementioned article. 



61 



Pennryn Fitts explained the article. Chelmsford would 
have it's own By-Law concerning dogs, and be responsi- 
ble for enforcing the by-law. The Board of Selectmen and 
the Finance Committee support the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 140 Section 147A authorizing the 
Town of Chelmsford to enact by-laws and ordinances 
relative to the regulation of dogs. 

Selectman Emerson explained that this would remove 
Chelmsford from the Middlesex County jurisdiction of 
mandating the Town's dog licenses, etc. Chelmsford 
would be responsible for it's own by-law and issue it's own 
licenses. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Chairman of the Board of Health Peter Dulchinos, 
moved to remove Article 11 from the table. Motion car- 
ried by voice vote. 

Chairman of the Board of Health Peter Dulchinos, 
moved to dismiss Article 1 1 due to the funding of the 
closure of the Swain Road landfill being passed in Article 
13. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. 
moved to postpone this article until the completion of the 
Special Town Meeting schedule for May 12th. The article 
will be acted on after article 9. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 Town Treasurer, James 
Doukszewicz, moved that the Town vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, to enter into compensating balance 
agreements, during fiscal 1987, as permitted by General 
Laws, Chapter 41. 

James Doukszewicz, explained that this was a new 
regulation that enforced Cities/Towns to pay for the ser- 
vices offered by banks. In the past banks did not charge 
the Town for bad check's payroll services etc., as long as 
money accounts were kept with the bank, however, now 
they must charge. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. The Board of Selectmen supported 
the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 24 Library Trustee, Mark 
Gauthier, moved to postpone this article until the com- 
pletion of the Special Town Meeting schedule for May 
12th. The article will be acted on after article 23. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25 Chairman of the Library 
Trustees, Susan Cantin, dismissed the article. 



UNDER ARTICLE 26 Capital Planning Member, 
James Doukszewicz, moved that the Town vote to transfer 
and appropriate the sum of one hundred and thirty seven 
thousand five hundred dollars ($137,500.00) from the 
unexpended proceeds of the School Capital Improvement 
Project Bond and/or note Issue, from Article 10 of the 
1985 Annual Town Meeting for the purpose of the 
rehabilitation of the roof at the Westlands School. 

Capital Planning Member, James Doukszewicz, ex- 
plained that there was money left in the account ear- 
marked for roof work, once money is set aside for certain 
projects, that is the only work that the money can be 
spent on. The Finance Committee recommended the ar- 
ticle. The Selectman support the article. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27 Selectman, John P. Emerson 
Jr., moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 64C Section 3 A, 
authorizing the Town of Chelmsford to impose a local 
room occupancy excise at the rate of 4% to be effective 
July 1, 1986. 

The Board of Selectman recommend the article. They 
felt that the town had a opportunity to raise additional 
revenue. The Finance Committee was against the mo- 
tion. The Finance Committee felt that the figure that 
could be raised in question, was not a true figure, and 
that the Town shouldn't depend on the amount for fun- 
ding. Attorney Joseph Shanahan representing the two 
hotel owners in Town, (The Kelley Family and Dumont 
Family) spoke against the article. He said surrounding 
cities/ towns do not have such a tax, and would be unfair 
to force such a tax on these two property owners who are 
already paying their fair share in real estate taxes to the 
Town. A lengthy discussion followed, with a number of 
voters speaking in favor and against the article. Select- 
man Ready made a motion to move the question. The 
Moderator asked if there was any further need for discus- 
sion. Hearing none he asked for a voice vote, motion car- 
ried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 28 Acting Fire Chief, James Sousa, 
moved to amend the article by deleting the words, 
"Board of Selectmen" and replace them with the words 
"Chief of the Fire Department", through out the article. 
The Finance recommended the amendment. The Board 
of Selectmen were in favor. James Sousa explained the 
reason for his motion to the Town Meeting body. A 
discussion took place. William Dalton moved the ques- 
tion, the Moderator asked for any need for further discus- 
sion. Hearing none he asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to amend, motion carried. He then asked for a voice 
vote on the main motion, as amended, motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman, John P. Emerson Jr., moved that the Town 
vote to amend the General By-Laws Article VI Police 
Regulations, Section 19 Prohibition on leaving Motor 
Vehicles in Certain Private Ways, by deleting 
paragraph #2 in its entirety, and substituting the follow- 
ing in its place: 



62 



2. It shall be unlawful to obstruct or park a motor vehi- 
cle in any fire lane, such fire land to be designated by the 
Chief of the Fire Department and shall be posted as such. 
Said fire lane to be NOT LESS THAN eighteen (18) Feet 
Wide for all buildings in any shopping center, bowling 
alley, theatre, nursing home, office building, or other 
public building. The establishment of fire lanes as set 
forth above shall be at the sole discretion of the Chief of 
the Fire Department and shall run from the wall of the 
building or any overhang of the building or any sidewalk 
adjacent thereto. Any fire lane in excess of eighteen (18) 
feet wide shall have the approval of the property owner or 
person in control of such property; 

(a) The Chief of the Fire Department shall notify all 
record owners of the designation of Fire lanes. 

Selectman Emerson moved to adjourn the meeting un- 
til Monday May 12th, 1986 to the McCarthy Jr. High 
Gymnasium. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried, the meeting adjourned at 11:05 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 12, 1986 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at the McCarthy Jr. High Gymnasium at 7:50 PM, 
by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 505 voters present. 

UNDER ARTICLE 29 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to accept Hart Road, as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen and shown by their reports 
and plans duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen 
recommend the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to discontinue a portion of 
Russell Mill Road, as shown on a plan of land entitled, 
"Easement as built Plan of Land in Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, prepared by Vanasse/Hangen Engineer- 
ing, Inc., dated February 6, 1986, hereinafter referred to 
as the Plan, and I move that the Town vote to accept the 
portion of Russell Mill Road, as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen and shown by their reports and said plan, duly 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and I move that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, for con- 
sideration to be determined, to convey and transfer, all 
right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in the 
above parcel of the land located on the discontinued por- 
tion of Russell Mill Road, provided no abutter shall be 
land locked as a result of said conveyance. 



The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen 
recommend the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the board of 
Selectmen to purchase or take by eminent domain, access 
easement over a parcel of land described below and own- 
ed by New England Power Company: and further to raise 
and appropriate, the sum of one dollar ($1.00) a sum of 
money for appraisal fees, engineering fees, land acquisi- 
tion costs and related expenses; the said land is described 
as follows: 

BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY 
SIDE OF SAID PINE STREET AT THE SOUTH- 
EASTERLY CORNER OF THE GRANTED PREMISES 
AND AT LAND NOW OR FORMERLY OF HENRY E. 
AND MARY T. SHERMAN: THENCE RUNNING S 83 
30 ' 35" W SEVENTY (70) FEET TO A POINT BEING 
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID PARCEL: 
thence S 82 43 ' 50" E NINETY-SIX AND EIGHTY 
ONE HUNDREDTHS (96.80) FEET TO A POINT: 
THENCE S 31 30 ' 55 " W SIXTY-NINE AND NINETY- 
ONE HUNDREDTHS (69.91) FEET TO THE POINT 
OF BEGINNING OF HEREIN DESCRIBED PARCEL 
OF LAND, CONTAINING 5,809 +/- SQUARE FEET 
OF LAND: 

Said parcel of land, a portion which lies in the Town of 
Chelmsford and the remainder lying in the Town of 
Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. 

Said parcel is a portion of land shown as parcel #3 con- 
taining 3.03 acres as shown on Plan of Land for New 
England Power Company which plan is recorded in said 
Registry of Deeds in Book of Plans 119, Plan 152. 

Selectman Emerson explained that this street starts in 
the Town of Billerica, and comes through to Brick Kiln 
Road in Chelmsford. Pending the possible traffic pro- 
blems due to the UPS facility opening on Brick Kiln Road 
the Towns agreed to the above taking to ward off access 
onto Brick Kiln Road. 

The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen 
recommend the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to convey 
and transfer all right, title and interest, if any, held by 
the Town in a certain parcel of land located at 25 Fourth 
Avenue in Chelmsford and show as lots 62 and 63 on 
Assessors map 66. 

Roger Clermont who abuts the property explained that 
he would like to extend his back yard, and by obtaining 
this land he would be able to do so. The Finance Com- 
mittee recommend the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 



63 



UNDER ARTICLE 33 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined to convey 
and transfer all right, title, and interest, if any, held by 
the Town in a certain parcel of land located at 9 Alcorn 
Road, and being the premises taken by the Town of 
Chelmsford by an instrument of taking dated May 3, 
1979 and recorded in Middlesex North District Registry 
of Deeds in Book 2364, Page 135, containing approx- 
imately 1.3 acres of land, more or less. 

The Finance Committee wanted to hear from the abut- 
ting land owner before making any recommendation. 
The Moderator asked for the land owner to come forward 
and explained the purpose for the request. The land 
owner was not present. Elizabeth Marshall of the Finance 
Committee, explained that it has been the policy of the 
Finance Committee to only recommend selling any Town 
owned land after hearing the intent of the buyer. If a 
buyer is not present to explain the purpose, then the 
Finance Committee automatically does not recommend 
the article. The Finance Committee did not recommend 
the article. The Board of Selectmen did not recommend 
the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 34 Attorney James Geary, 
representing the petitioner, explained the purpose of the 
article. The land abutts the Scotty Hollow Con- 
dominiums, and if the present zoning of single residence 
is changed to multiple residence then the land owners 
would be able to sell their land to the builder of the con- 
dominiums, Robert Hicks, who wants to expand his com- 
plex. There was a question about the possibility of 
methane gas being located on the land, but tests have 
been taken and verify that the gas is not on the site. 
Chairman of the Planning Board, John F. McCarthy, 
read the following recommendation: The Planning 
Board conducted a public hearing on March 26, 1986, 
and voted to recommend in favor of this article. The vote 
was 6-0. Although this article is not part of the master 
plan, the rezoning is consistent with the intent of the 
master plan. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommend the article. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, which left the chair in doubt. The following tellers 
came forward and a hand count was taken: 



Jack Peters 
Norman LeBrecque 
Jean Horgan 
Ed Hilliard 
John Warren 
Harry Foster 



Jacob Sartz 
Donald Elias 
William Drury 
Jocelyn Anthony 
Estelle Decker 



Hand count result Yes 155, No 175, motion defeated 
(see warrant for working of the article). 



Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., moved to recess the ad- 
journed annual Town Meeting in order to conduct the 
Special Town Meeting which was posted to begin at 8:00 
PM. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion car- 
ried. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 12, 1986 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at the 
McCarthy Jr. High Gymnasium at 8:10 PM by the 
Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized the presence 
of a quorum. There were 508 voters present. Selectman 
John P. Emerson Jr., moved that the reading of the Con- 
stable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman John P. 
Emerson Jr. , moved that the reading of the entire war- 
rant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

Chairman of the Conservation Commission, James 
McBride, moved to take article 11 out of order, and to 
place it first on the warrant of the Special. He explained 
that it would make a difference with article 2 if the Town 
Meeting Body knew the result of article 1 1 . The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Roger Blomgren, 
spoke in favor of the article. Conservation Chairman, 
James McBride, moved to amend the article by deleting 
the sentence of "a fee of up to 2% on real estate transfer" 
and substituting the following: funded by a fee of V£ % on 
real estate transfer, and further to place an exclusion on 
the first $100,000. of any sale under the provisions of said 
petition. 

The Finance Committee was in favor of the motion to 
amend. A majority of the Board of Selectmen were in 
favor of the motion. Selectman Blomgren spoke against 
the motion. He felt that the article should be voted on ex- 
actly as it is, it is not necessary to amend this is just to 
petition the legislature at this time. Conservation Chair- 
man, James McBride, felt that the legislature should 
know the exact figure before they vote on it. A lengthy 
discussion took place. A number of voters spoke for and 
against the motion to amend. The Moderator asked if 
there was any need for further discussion, hearing none 
he asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend. Motion 
carried. He then asked if there was any need for more 
discussion on the main motion as amended, motion car- 
ried. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., moved that the Town 
vote to direct the Board of Selectmen to petition the great 
and General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts to enact special legislation establishing a land bank 
program for the purchase of real estate interest for con- 
servation or preservation of open space, wetlands, water 
resource areas, agricultural areas, wildlife areas or for ac- 
tive and passive recreation areas, and for the manage- 
ment of these and existing areas owned by the Town, 



64 



funded by a fee of V£ % on real estate transfer, and fur- 
ther to place an exclusion on the first $100,000.00 of any 
sale under the provisions of said petition, said land bank 
to be administered by the Conservation Commission, said 
bill, when approved by the legislature and signed into law 
by the Governor, to be approved in its final form by the 
voters at an annual or special town meeting in order for it 
to be implemented or at the State and/or Local elections 
in the form of a ballot question. 

Chairman of the Conservation James McBride, moved 
to take article 2 out of order, and place it next on the 
agenda. The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Com- 
mittee recommended the motion. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Conservation Chairman, James 
McBride, spoke about the article. He explained the im- 
portance of obtaining open space in the Town. He show- 
ed a brief slide show of the Cranberry Bog, showing the 
wildlife and surroundings. He also expressed the impor- 
tance of having the bog because of our need for future 
water. The present owner at one time did offer to sell the 
bog to Chelmsford, and the town did not express any in- 
terest at the time. Now there is a possibility that a 
developer may obtain the land and build on it in both 
Chelmsford and Carlisle. 

The Commission intends to apply under the self help 
program for an 80% grant. If funded through this pro- 
gram, then the Town will receive back 80% reimburse- 
ment. If the Town doesn't receive the grant, then we will 
use the monies available from the land bank, to pay the 
interest payment for a bond. The first year of payment 
will come from the land acquisition account. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen supported the article. The 
Moderator asked for the need to hear further discussion 
on the article. Hearing none he asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as 
follows: 

Conservation Chairman James McBride, moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, to ac- 
quire in fee simple, by purchase, by eminent domain, or 
otherwise, the property located in the Town of 
Chelmsford and further described and shown on a plan 
entitled, "Compiled Plan of land in the Town of 
Chelmsford" prepared by, April 23, 1986, scale 1 " = 100 ' 
by James E. Pearson. P.E. Chelmsford Town Engineer, 
copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Engineer 
and is incorporated herewith, for the purpose of main- 
taining conservation and open space, land within the 
Town of Chelmsford with said land being held, managed 
and controlled by the Conservation Commission for the 
promotion and development of the land for the above 
purposes, and further, I move that the Town vote to 
authorize the Conservation Commission to enter into a 
contractual self-help agreement with the office of En- 
vironmental Affairs, to defray all necessary costs, fees, 
and expenses in connection with the acquisition of said 
land and for paying any damages which may be awarded 



as a result of any such taking, and further, I move that 
the Town vote to, borrow, and the sum of eight hundred 
sixty-three thousand dollars ($863,000.00) and to 
authorize the Selectmen to transfer and appropriate the 
sum of sixty-two thousand dollars ($62,000.00) from the 
Conservation Trust Fund, to defray all necessary costs, 
fees, and expenses in connection with the acquisition of 
said land and for paying any damages which may be 
awarded as the result of any such taking. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Chairman of the Conservation 
Commission James McBride, moved to dismiss the article. 
He explained that by passing article 2 there is no need for 
this article. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen are in favor of the motion to dismiss. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, to 
dismiss. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 The Moderator explained that 
the consultants hired by Town to draft the Master Plan 
were present at the Meeting and the Planning Board re- 
quested permission from the Town Meeting Body to allow 
them to explain the different up coming articles. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion. Motion 
carried. Chairman of the Planning Board, John Mc- 
Carthy explained that two years ago the Town Meeting 
Body voted to allow the Planning Board to hire a consul- 
tant firm to update the zoning by-law and map. The 
Planning Board hired Weston & Sampson, and a Master 
Plan Committee was formed and together the group 
prepared the proposed changes. Tom Delia of Weston & 
Sampson explained the article. Chairman of the Plan- 
ning Board John McCarthy moved to amend the article 
by deleting subsection E in its entirety. Which would 
allow the Board of Appeals to continue to grant 
variances. And to correct a Typo error under the Intensi- 
ty of Use Schedule Exhibit "A" Minimum Lot Re- 
quirements area should read 1000 sq. ft. not as presented 
with the wording 100 sq. ft. He then read the Planning 
Boards recommendation: The Planning Board con- 
ducted a Public Hearing on May 8, 1986 and voted to 
recommend in favor of this article and unanimously 
voted to make the following amendments: (6-0) Article 3 
Section 2 — by deleting subsection E in its entirety. Article 
3 26000 Intensity of Use Schedule by deleting 100 sq. ft. 
from the minimum lot requirements and substituting 
1,000 sq. ft. in its place. 

The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the motion to amend. A discussion took place. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
delete section E, which left the chair in doubt the tellers 
came forward and a hand count was taken: Yes 218, No 
66, motion carried. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to correct the Intensity of Use Schedule, 
motion carried. The Finance Committee and the Board 
of Selectmen both recommended the main motion as 
amended. Selectman Emerson moved to amend section 
2300 Use Regulations Institutional Uses — Cemetery — 
Delete the P under RMH District and insert O. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend. Motion Carried, unanimously. Pauline Crowell 
who owned land in a CD district and had made ar- 
rangements after two years of negotiating to put a fur- 



65 



niture store on her property which had been allowed ac- 
cording to the zoning by-laws. After reading the public 
hearing advertisement she finds that this is not going to 
be allowed in the CD district, and wanted an explanation 
as to when the change took place and why. She didn't feel 
that this was fair and asked the Town Meeting Body to 
support her. Town Counsel James Harrington moved to 
recess the meeting for ten minutes in order to research the 
answer to the change. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to recess. Motion carried, the meeting 
recessed at 10:00 PM. At 10:10 PM the Moderator 
reconvened the meeting and Town Counsel gave an ex- 
planation: The warrant as posted and the motion as writ- 
ten reflected the correct information of "P(4)" under the 
CD district, however, the Public hearing advertisement 
was incorrect, and should not have "O" under the CD 
district. Therefore Pauline Crowell will be allowed to 
proceed with her plans to appear before the Planning 
Board and present the information required to allow a 
furniture store in the CD district. 

Chairman of the Planning Board read the Board's 
recommendation. The Planning Board conducted a 
public Hearing on May 8, 1986 and voted to recommend 
in favor of this article unanimously. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the main mo- 
tion as amended, which left the chair in doubt, the tellers 
came forward and a hand count was taken Yes 180, No 
73, motion carried. 

Article 3 in its entirety reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Planning Board, John McCarthy, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Chelmsford as follows: 

1. Amend Article I — Administration and Procedure, 
Section 1200 Administration, by adding the 
following subsection 1250: 



tion 1322, in its entirety, and substituting the 
following in its place: 

1322. To hear and decide appeals or petitions for 
variances from the terms of this By-Law with 
respect to particular land or structures. Such 
variance shall be granted only in cases where the 
Board of Appeals finds all of the following: 

(a) A literal enforcement of the provisions of this 
By-Law would involve a substantial hardship 
to the petitioner or appellant. 

(b) The hardship is owing to circumstances 
relating to the soil conditions, shape or 
topography of such land or structures and 
especially affecting such land or structures 
but not effecting generally the zoning district 
in which it is located. 

(c) Desirable relief may be granted without 
either: 

(1) substantial detriment to the public good; 
or 

(2) nullifying or substantially derogating 
from the intent or purpose of this By- 
Law. 

(d) The Board shall determine the conformance 
of any application for a variance with the 
Master Plan and shall consider the effect of 
the variance on the future development of the 
Town. 

3. Amend Article I — Administration and Procedure, 
by deleting subparagraph (b) of subsection 1424. 
Application for Special Permit and Site Plan, in 

its entirety and substituting the following sub- 
paragraph (b) in its place: 



1250. Application Procedure: Special Permits or 
Variances 

An application to the Board of Appeals or Plan- 
ning Board for a special permit or variance may 
be made by any person desiring such action by fil- 
ing with the appropriate Board the prescribed 
application which shall describe the request and 
contain such information as may be required by 
this By-Law and accompanied at the time of fil- 
ing by a plot plan drawn to scale showing the 
location of all lot and street lines, existing and 
proposed structures, utilities, wells, sewage 
disposal systems of the property which is the sub- 
ject of the appeal or application. All applications 
shall be accompanied by a plat map showing lot 
and street lines and approximate location of 
structures on premises adjacent to the property 
which is the subject of the application. 



(b) The contents of the site plan are as follows: 

(1) Four separate plans prepared at a scale of 
one inch equals 20 feet or such other scale 
as may be approved by the Planning 
Board. The four plans are as follows: 

(a) Site layout which shall contain the 
boundaries of the lot(s) in the proposed 
development, proposed structures, 
drives, parking, landscaping, screening, 
fences, walls, walks, outdoor lighting, 
and loading facilities. 

(b) Topography and Drainage Plan 
which shall contain the existing and pro- 
posed final topography at two foot inter- 
vals and plans for handling stormwater 
drainage. 



Amend Article I — Administration and procedure, 
Section 1300 Board of Appeals, by deleting subsec- 



(c) Utility and Landscaping Plan which 
shall include all facilities for refuse and 



66 



sewerage disposal or storage of all wastes, 
the location of all hydrants, fire alarm 
and fire fighting facilities on and adja- 
cent to the site, all proposed recreational 
facilities and open space areas, and all 
wetlands including flood plain areas. 

(d) Architectural Plan which shall in- 
clude the ground floor plan and architec- 
tural elevations of all proposed buildings. 

(2) A landscaping plan at the same scale as 
the site plan, showing the limits of work, 
existing tree lines, and all proposed land- 
scape features and improvements in- 
cluding planting areas with size and type 
of stock for each shrub or tree. 

(3) An Isometric line drawing (projection) at 
the same scale as the site plan, showing 
the entire project and its relation to ex- 
isting areas, building and roads for a 
distance of feet from the project boun- 
daries. 

(4) A locus plan at a scale of one inch equals 
100 feet (1 " equals 100 '), showing the en- 
tire project and its relation to existing the 
entire project and its relation to existing 
areas, buildings and roads for a distance 
of 1,000 feet from the project boundaries 
or such other distance as may be approv- 
ed or required by the Planning Board. 

4. Amend Article I — Administration and Procedure, 
subsection 1424. Application for Special Permit 
and Site Plan, by adding the following sub- 
paragraph (i): 

(i) Topography shall be prepared by using actual 
elevations of the Town of Chelmsford's 
Topographic Maps, 1976. 

5. Amend Article I — Administration and Procedure, 
Section 1420 Site Plan Review, by adding the 
following subsection: 

1428. Any easement, covenant or agreement that is re- 
quired as a result of the site plan review shall be 
recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

6. Amend Article II — District Regulations, by 
deleting Section 2100. Establishment of District, 

in its entirety, and substituting the following in its 
place. 

2100. Establishment of Districts 

For the purpose of this By-Law, the Town of 
Chelmsford is hereby divided into the following 
types of districts: 



RA — Residential A District These are single 
family residence districts which are adjacent to 
well sites or are environmentally sensitive because 
of the water table and wetlands. These areas are 
not slated for sewers anytime in the near future 
and need to be protected. These areas should not 
be intensively developed. 

RB — Residential B District These are low densi- 
ty single family residential areas in which some 
utilities are lacking. These areas comprise a ma- 
jor type of residential development in the Town. 

RC — Residential C District These are medium 
density general residence districts which serve as 
transition zones within the Town. 

RM — Residential Multi-Family District These 
are high density residential districts. 

CA — Neighborhood Commercial District These 
are commercial districts for neighborhood areas. 

CB — Roadside Commercial District These are 
general commercial districts which are high traf- 
fic generators. Included are such uses as 
automotive repair, open lot sales, wholesale 
business, storage and so on. 

CC — Shopping Center District These are com- 
mercial districts designed to allow the clustering 
of stores, offices and so on around a central park- 
ing area. These are high traffic generators usual- 
ly located on major roads. 

CD — General Commercial District These are 
primarily retail commercial offices, restaurants 
and entertainment commercial uses excluding 
repair, open lot sales, wholesale and storage uses. 
These uses are usually located along existing ma- 
jor traffic throughfares. 

CX — Adult Entertainment Districts These are 
commercial districts created for adult entertain- 
ment establishments and other permitted uses as 
defined by this By-Law. 

IA — Limited Industrial District These are areas 
that are primarily used for research development, 
manufacturing and warehousing with the 
necessary office space. 



IS — Special Industrial District These districts 
are open to all industrial uses but are suited for 
heavy industrial and storage. 

P — Public District These are lands owned or 
leased by federal, state or municipal governments 
for governmental purposes. 

OS — Open Space District These are privately 
owned lands dedicated to recreational uses. 



67 



RMH — Residential Mobile Home District 

These are districts created in accordance with the 
provisions of this ordinance. 

7. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2100. Establishment of District, by adding the 
following subsections 2110. Official Zoning Map, 
and, 2120. Rules for Interpretation of Zoning 
District Boundaries: 



(c) boundary lines located outside of street lines 
and shown approximately parallel thereto 
shall be regarded as parallel to such street 
lines, and dimensions shown in figures places 
upon said map between such boundary lines 
and street lines are the distance in feet of such 
boundary lines from such a street lines; such 
distances being measured at right angles to 
such street lines unless otherwise indicated. 



21 10. Official Zoning Map. The Town is hereby divid- 
ed into Zoning "Districts also referred to as Zones 
as shown on the Official Zoning Map, which 
together with all explanatory material, thereon, 
is hereby adopted by reference and declared to be 
part of this By-law. The Official Zoning Map 
shall be identified by the signature of the Chair- 
man of the Board of Selectmen, and attested by 
the Town Clerk bearing the Seal of the Town. 
The Official Zoning Map is included as originally 
dated May, 1963 and as most recently amended. 



(d) in all cases which are not covered by other 
provisions of this section, the location of 
boundary lines shall be determined by the 
distance in feet, in given, from other lines 
upon said map, by the use of identifications as 
shown on the map, or by the scale of the map. 

(e) where the district boundary lines follows a 
stream, lake or other body of water, said 
boundary line shall be constructed to be at 
the thread or channel of the stream; or at the 
limit of the jurisdiction of the Town of 
Chelmsford, unless otherwise indicated. 



2120. Rules for Interpretation of Zoning District 
Boundaries. Where uncertainties exist as to the 
boundaries of districts as shown on the official 
zoning maps the following shall apply: 

(a) where the boundary lines as shown upon said 
map as approximately following the street 
lines of public and private ways or railways, 
the centerlines of such ways shall be the boun- 
dary lines. 

(b) where the boundary lines are shown approx- 
imately on the location of property lot lines, 
and the exact location of property, lot or 
boundary lines is not indicated by means of 
dimensions shown in figures, then the proper- 
ty or lot lines shall be the boundary lines. 



(f) where a district boundary line divides any lot 
existing at the time such line is adopted, the 
regulations of any district in which the lot has 
frontage on a street may be extended by 
special permit from the Board of Appeals not 
more than thirty feet into the other district. 

(g) where physical or cultural features existing on 
the ground are at variance with those shown 
on the official map, or in other circumstances 
not covered by the above subsections, the 
Board of Appeals shall interpret the district 
boundaries. 

Amend II — District Regulations, by deleting Sec- 
tion 2300 Use Regulations Schedule, in its entire- 
ty, and substituting the following in its place: 



68 



2300 USE REGULATIONS 



Business Uses See Sec. 4500 for Major Business Comple 

Retail scores and services not elsewhere listed 

Motor Vehicle Sales 

Motor Vehicle Rental 

Motor Vehicle General Repair 

Motor Vehicle Light Service (2) 

Motor Vehicle Parts (No Services) 

Motor Vehicle Body Repair 

Restaurant 

Fast Food Establishment 

Business, Professional Offices 

Medical Center, Clinic 

Bank, Financial Agency 

Indoor Commercial Recreation 

Outdoor Commercial Recreation 

Fairs, Carnivals, Similar Events (See Section 4300) 

Animal Clinic or Hospital 

Animal Kennel 

Funeral Home 

Nursing or Convalescent Home 

Adult Entertainment Establishment (See Section 4600) 

Motel or Hotel 



P(l) P(4) P(4) P(4) 



P(4) 
P(4) 



P(4) 
P(4) 



P(4) 
P(4) 



P(4) P(4) O 



P(4) 
P(4) 



and Egress by Private Way 
an IA District ( 



Industrial Uses See Sec. 4500 for Major Business 

Comlexes 

Earth Removal (See Sec. 4200) 

Light Industry 

Pedestrian and Vehicular acce 

to and from uses permitted 
Warehouses and Open Storage 
Junk Yard 
Contractor's Yard 
Granite Operations 
Public Utility or Public Works Storage Yard 

or Repair Shop 
Research, Experimental and Testing Lab 
Solid Waste Disposal Facility 
Sanitary Landfill 
Refuse Incinerator 
Transport Terminal 



Institutional Uses See Sec. 4500 for Majo 
Religious Purposes 
Educational Purposes 

Exempt by Statute 

Other Nursery Schools 

Other Schools 
Cemetery 
Municipal Building Except Garages. Storage 

or Repair Shops 
Hospital 
Other Public or Semi-Public Institution of a 

Historic, Philanthropic, or Charitable Character 



nplexes 



Recreational Uses 

Club or Lodge 

Riding Academy or Publi< 

Boathouse, Private 

Boathouse, Public 

Golf Course 

Campground 



Residential Uses 
Single-family Dwelling 
Two-Family Dwelling 
Multi-Family Dwelling 
Conversion of Dwellings (si 
Boarding House 
Mobile Home 
Cluster Development 



P(6) O 



Rural Uses 

Farm, 5 acres o 
Farm, under 5 ; 
Wood Operatioi 



more 
cres (3) 



Other Principal Uses 

Airport 



69 



Accessory Uses See Sec. 4500 for Major Business Comple 

Family Day Care Home 

Business Daycare 

Home Occupation (See Sec. 4110) 

Mobile Home Storage 

Roadside Stand 

Barn Sale, Garage Sale, Yard Sale, Flea Market 

(see Sec. 4130) 
Scientific Uses (see Sec. 4140) 
Retail sale of goods, the majority of which are 

produced or undergo major processing on the 

premises 
Adult Entertainment Establishment (see Sec. 4600) 
Temporary Structure 
Parking Garage 



O 



o 



o 



o 



NOTES FOR USE REGULATIONS SCHEDULE: 

No structure shall exceed 3,000 sq. ft. gross floor area. 

Provided there are no structures, pumps, or fuel storage tanks within 50 feet of a 

Provided that there are neither hogs nor fur-bearing animals. 

Except "BA" if resulting in more than 10,000 sq. ft. gross floor area devoted to b 

Maximum seating capacity shall be 30 and no alcoholic beverages shall be sold 

Intensity of use shall be limited to permit a maximum of 7 units per acre and 

Retail outlet not to exceed 1,000 sq. ft. or 10% of the EG. A., whichever is less. 

No roadside stands permitted in Historic District(s). 



KEY: 



residential district. 



i on the pr< 
1 on the pr< 
of 254 units per RMH Dis 



A permitted use. 

An excluded or prohibited use. 

A use authorized under Special Permit for exception from the Board of Appeals as provided for i 

A use authorized under a Special Permit for exception from the Planning Board as provided for : 



Section 1500. 
1500. 



BA(7) BAS(7) O 



2600. Intensity of Use Schedule 



,imum Lot Requirements 
rea{1000sq. ft.) (g) 

Width (feet) 

Depth (feet) 

Frontage (feet) 



Yard Requ 
Front (feet) (c) 
Side (feet) 
Rear (feet) 

Maximum Building 
Coverage (percent) 
Height (feet) 

linimum % of Lot Area 
Landscaped Open Spac 
Located in Front Yard 



(1) EXHIBIT A 



RM 
40(a) 



25(d) 
30(d) 



10 



10 



IS ex 

40(b) 40 



200 
200 
200 



20 60 60 20 40(f) 40(f) 

10(e) 30(e) 30(e) 10(e) 40(f) 40(f) 
10(e) 20(e) 30(e) 10(e) 30(f) 30(f) 



30(e) 10(e) 



10 



10 



10 



10(h) 10(h) 10 



1(1 



Footnotes to Intensity of Use Schedule 

a. For multi-family dwellings, not less than 80,000 square feet or 6,000 square feet per dwelling unit, whichever is greater. 

b. For Solid Waste Disposal Facility, Sanitary Landfill, Refuse Incinerator or Granite Operations, the minimum shall be 10 acres. 

c. Corner lots shall maintain front yard requirements for each street frontage. 

d. Increase by 20 feet where abutting an RA or RB District. At least 20 feet of any or all such yards abutting an RA or RB District shall be landscaped open space or natural 
screening subject to Section 3423 of this Bylaw. 

butting a residential district. Required side and rear yards abutting any residential district shall be landscaped open space and screened subject to 



by 20 feet whe 
Section 3423. 



f. Increase to 100 feet when abutting a residential district; 20 feet of this shall be landscaped open space and screened subject to Section 3423. 

g. For non-family accommodations, increase minimum lot area by 10% for each person accommodated in excess or eight. 
h. Required to be located in front yards. 

i. Municipal waste water pumping stations for any sewer system with the Town of Chelmsford shall not be subject to lot, yard, or coverage requirement. 



70 



9. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2400. Nonconforming Uses, by deleting subsec- 
tion 2440. Restoration, in its entirety, and 
substituting the following in its place. 

2440. Restoration or Rehabilitation. No non- 
conforming structure, other than a single or two- 
family dwelling, damaged by fire, storm or other 
accidental causes to the extent of more than 
seventy-five percent of its replacement value or to 
the extent of being dismantled more than 
seventy-five percent for rehabilitation purposes 
shall be repaired or rehabilitated except in con- 
formity with this By-Law, and provided further 
that such restoring shall be completed within two 
years after such catastrophe. 

10. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2500 Intensity of Use Regulations, by deleting 
subsection 2520. Lot change in its entirety and 
substituting the following in its place. 

2520. Lot Change. No lot shall be created, nor shall an 
existing lot be changed in size or shape except 
through a public land taking or donation for 
road widening, drainage, utility improvements or 
except where otherwise permitted herein, so as to 
increase the degree of non-conformity that 
presently exists. 

11. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2500. Intensity of Use Regulations, by deleting 
subsection 2530. Isolated Lots, in its entirety and 
substituting the following in its place. 

2530. Isolated Lots. Any increase in lot areas, width, 
depth, frontage, yard or coverage requirements 
of this By-Law shall not apply to erection, exten- 
sion, alteration, or moving of a structure on a 
legally created lot not meeting current re- 
quirements provided that the applicant 
documents that, 

(a) At the time such increased lot requirements 
became applicable to it, the lot: 

(1) had at least 5,000 sq. ft. of lot area and 
50 feet of frontage on a street; and 

(2) was held in ownership separate from all 
other lots having frontage within 1,000 
feet; and 

(3) conformed to then existing dimensional 
requirements; and 

(b) the lot is to be used for single-family or non- 
residential use. 

Such non conforming lots may be changed in size or 
shape or their land area recombined without losing 
this exemption, so long as the change does not in- 



crease the actual or potential number of building 
lots. 

12. Amend Article II — District Regulations, Section 
2500. Intensity of Use Regulations, by deleting 
subsection 2540. Accessory Buildings, in its entire- 
ty and substituting the following in its place. 

2540. Accessory Buildings. No accessory building or 
structure except a permitted sign or roadside 
stand, shall be located within a required front 
yard area. A detached accessory building may be 
located in the rear yard areas and on the same lot 
as a principal building, provided that not more 
than twenty-five percent of the required yard 
area shall be so occupied, and further provided 
that an accessory building shall not be located 
nearer than ten feet from the principal building 
and at least ten feet from any side or rear lot line. 
An accessory building attached to its principal 
building or within ten feet of it shall be con- 
sidered an integral part thereof and as such shall 
be subject to the front, side, and rear yard re- 
quirements applicable to the principal building. 

13. Amend Article II — District Regulation, Section 
2500. Intensity of Use Regulations, by deleting 
subsection 2550. Erection of more than one prin- 
cipal building on a lot, in its entirety and 
substituting the following in its place. 

2550. Erection of More Than One Principal 
Building on a Lot. No more than one principal 
residential building shall be permitted on a lot 
except in the case of motels, hotels, mobile home 
parks and multi-family structures which shall be 
reviewed by the Planning Board in accordance 
with Section 1420 — (Replace) Site Plan Review. 
In any commercial or industrial district, more 
than one principal building or structure may be 
erected or moved onto a lot provided that area, 
frontage, lot coverage and yard requirements can 
be met as though each structure were located on 
an individual lot, and provided that the plans 
therefore are reviewed by the Planning Board in 
accordance with Section 1420. 

14. Amend Article II — District Regulations, by 
deleting Section 2600. Intensity of Use Schedule 

in its entirety and substituting the following in its 
place: 

See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and incorporated 
herewith 

15. Amend Article II — District Regulations Section 
2740. District Use Regulations by deleting subsec- 
tion 2742. being the third subsection of Section 
2740. District Use Regulations in its entirety, and 
substituting the following in its place: 



71 



2742a. In the floodway, designated on the Chelmsford 
Flood Plain and Floodway District Map, the 
following provisions shall apply: 

1. All encroachments including fill, new con- 
struction, substantial improvements to ex- 
isting structures, and other development are 
prohibited unless certification by a registered 
professional engineer is provided by the appli- 
cant demonstrating that such encroachment 
shall not result in any increase in flood levels 
during the occurrence of the 100-year flood. 

2. Any encroachment meeting the above stan- 
dard shall comply with the floodplain re- 
quirements of the State Building Code. 

3. If a property owner questions the location of a 
Flood Plain or Floodway District, the owner 
may engage at his own cost a Registered 
Licensed Surveyor with the approval of the 
Town Engineer to determine if the land in 
question is within the Flood Plan or Floodway 
District. The Town may charge the lan- 
downer for all or part of the cost for this 
determination. 

16. Amend Article III — General Regulations, Section 
3100. Off Street Parking and Loading, subsection 
3120. Number of spaces, by deleting the first 
paragraph in its entirety and substituting the 
following in its place. 

3120. Number of Spaces. For the purpose of com- 
puting the parking requirements of different 
uses, the number of spaces required shall be the 
largest whole number obtained after increasing 
all fractions upwards to one. Employees shall in- 
clude the largest number of owners, managers, 
full and part-time workers and volunteers that 
may be normally expected on the premises during 
any single shift or portion thereof. The number 
of seats in benches, pews, or other continuous 
seating arrangements shall be calculated at 20 in- 
ches for each seat. Parking spaces shall be no less 
than 8.5 feet in width and 19 feet in length. The 
following minimum parking requirements shall 
apply to uses as listed below: 

17. Amend Article III — General Regulations, Section 
3100. Off Street Parking and Loading, by adding 
the following subsection 3121. Size of Parking 
Area and 3122. Handicapped Parking Areas. 

3121. Size of Parking Area. 

(a) The area of the parking lot shall be deter- 
mined by the following table. 



STALL AND AISLE DIMENSIONS 



Angle X 



16.9 


11.0 


26.4 


17. 


19.4 


13.5 


32.9 


12. 


20.7 


18.5 


37.2 


9. 


20.8 


19.5 


38.6 


9. 


20.2 


24.0 


38.9 


8. 


19.0 


27.0 


38.0 


8. 



.8 


16.5 


.4 


13.4 


.8 


9.5 


.4 


6.5 


.8 


3.3 


.0 


0.0 



(b) If a property owner can demonstrate to the 
satisfaction of the Planning Board/ Builder 
Inspector that the required number of spaces 
will not be needed for the purposed use, the 
Planning Board may waive some of the re- 
quired spaces on the condition that the area 
necessary for those spaces is available on the 
lot. If, anytime after the property is in use, 
the Building Inspector determines that a need 
exists for the additional spaces, the Building 
Inspector may require that these spaces be ad- 
ded. 

3122. Handicapped Parking Areas. Article VI Police 
Regulations of the Town of Chelmsford General 
By-Laws, entitled Section 20 Prohibition on 
unauthorized Parking in Designated Han- 
dicapped Parking Spaces in Private or Public 
Ways, is incorporated herein. 

18. Amend Article III — General Regulations, Section 
3100. Off Street Parking and Loading, by 

deleting subsection 3141. in its entirety, and adding 
the following subsection in its place. 

3141. No off street parking area shall be located within 
20 feet of a street right of way, or in any required 
yard adjacent to a residential or institutional use. 

19. Amend Article III — General Regulations, Section 
3100. Off Street Parking and Loading, by adding 
the following subsection. 

3146. Parking Garages. An application for a special 
permit for a parking garage shall require the sub- 
mission of a site plan in conformance with Sec- 
tion 1420. Site Plan Review. No parking garage 
shall exceed three stories in height (35 feet), and 
when taken in consideration with the principal 
structure, shall not exceed the lot coverage for 
the applicable zoning district. 

20. Amend Article III — General Regulations, subsec- 
tion 3351. Overspill, by adding the following sub- 
paragraph (e) 

3351. (e) Exterior lighting fixtures other than signs are 
mounted not more than 20 feet high. 

21. Amend Article III — General Regulations, Section' 
3400. Grading and Screening, by deleting subsec- 
tion 3423. in its entirety and substituting the follow- 
ing in its place. 



72 



3423. Screening in this context shall mean any of the 
following items: 

(a) an area 10 feet wide or wider when specified, 
densely planted and maintained with a dou- 
ble row of compact evergreen trees 6 feet or 
more in height when planted; the area be- 
tween the ground and a point 6 feet above the 
ground shall be maintained as the trees 
mature to insure a dense screening; 

(b) a wall 6 feet high; 

(c) a fence, 6 feet high, 50 percent opaque; 

(d) an earthen berm at least 42 inches in height, 
with a fence or vegetation to reach 6 feet in 
height; 

(e) an equivalent visual screening by building 
placement, natural vegetation or difference 
in elevation between potential viewers and the 
screened areas. Where necessary, lower 
elements shall be used for egress visibility. 

22. Amend Article IV — Special Regulation, by 
deleting subsection 4160. Animals Accessory to 
Dwellings, and substituting the following in its 
place: 

4160. Animals Accessory to Dwelling. Cattle, horses, 
sheep, hogs, goats, gamebirds, or similar live- 
stock may be maintained accessory to a dwelling 
only on a lot having an area of not less than 
40,000 square feet plus 15,000 square feet per 
large animal (25 pounds or heavier at maturity) 
in excess of one or per ten smaller animals in ex- 
cess of the first ten. Such animals and their wastes 
shall be contained at least 50 feet from any abut- 
ting lot line of a residentially used lot, and at least 
50 feet from any year-round surface water body. 

23. Amend Article IV — Special Regulations, by delet- 
ing subsections 4542 and 4543 in their entirety and 
substitute the following subsections 4542. and 
4543., in their place. 

4542. As part of the site plan review process, the appli- 
cant shall submit, at his cost, a report by a li- 
censed engineer on the impact of traffic from the 
proposed development on the existing conditions. 
This report shall contain: an analysis of the pre- 
sent situation, the potential traffic resulting from 
the development, the impact of new traffic re- 
sulting from the development, the impact of new 
traffic on the existing road conditions and 
capacities. Capacity of the road(s) affected by the 
proposed development shall be determined by us- 
ing the definitions and methods of estimation as 
outlined by the Highway Research Board 
Highway Capacity Manual, 1965 or later edi- 
tions. If the study shows that there will be an in- 



crease in traffic above the present level of services 
at any point within one mile of the premises, the 
engineer shall prepare alternative techniques to 
maintain the same level of service. 

4543. Design of storm sewers, retention basins and 
general site plan design shall be based on a ten- 
year frequency storm. Design of culverts shall be 
based on a twenty-five year frequency storm. 
Consideration shall be given to damage avoid- 
ance for a 100-year storm. There shall be no net 
increase of runoff above current flows, and the 
design capacity of receiving structures or the 
channel capacity of receiving streams shall not be 
exceeded. 

24. Amend Article IV — Special Regulations by adding 
the following subsections, 4450. Density Bonus, 
and 4451: 

4450. Density Bonus. For every one unit in ten set aside 
for low and moderate income persons and 
families in a multifamily housing project, the ap- 
plicant may apply and the Planning Board may 
grant a bonus of one additional unit. 

To apply the applicant shall demonstrate to the 
Planning Board that: 

(a) The rent required for the unit set aside shall 
meet the affordable rents established by the 
Department of Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment for the Chelmsford area; and 

(b) The unit set aside shall be made available to 
low and moderate income persons and 
families for a period of no less than ten years; 
and 

(c) The low and moderate income level shall be 
as defined by the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development for the Chelmsford area. 

4451. The applicant shall work with the Housing 
Authority to rent units to eligible persons and 
families. 

25. Amend Article V — Definitions by deleting the 
definitions of farm, fast food restaurant, motel or 
hotel, outdoors commercial recreation, tem- 
porary structure, and warehouse, and open 
storage in their entirety, and substitute the follow- 
ing in their respective places. 

Farm: Any parcel of land which is used for gain in 
the raising of agricultural products, livestock, 
poultry, dairy products and game foul. It includes 
necessary farm structures within the prescribed 
limits of the storage of equipment used. It excludes 
the raising of fur bearing animals, hogs, riding 
academies, livery or boarding stables and dog ken- 
nels. 



73 



Fast Food Restaurant: An establishment whose 
principal business is the sale of pre-prepared or 
rapidly prepared food directly to the customer in a 
ready to consume state for consumption either 
within the restaurant building or off premises and 
usually requires ordering food at a counter. 

Motel or Hotel: A building or group of buildings 
providing accommodation for compensation on a 
transient basis, but not meeting the definition of 
"Boarding House". Accommodations individually 
having a stove and either or both a refrigerator and 
sink shall be considered dwelling units. 

Outdoor Commercial Recreation: Drive-in 
theater, golf driving range, miniature golf, race 
track, amusement park, professional sports 
stadium, or similar commercial recreation con- 
ducted in whole or in part outdoors. 

Temporary Structure: A structure without any 
foundation or footings to be removed within a 12 
month time period. Said structure shall conform to 
the requirements of the Intensity Schedule of Sec- 
tion 2600 and shall receive a permit from the 
Building Inspector. 

Transport Terminal: Terminal facilities for 
handling freight with or without maintenance 
facilities. 

Warehouse: A building used primarily for the 
storage of goods and materials, for distribution, but 
not for sale on the premises. 

26. Amend Article V — Definitions by adding the 
following definitions: 

Animal Clinic or Hospital: A place where animals 
or pets are given medical or surgical treatment and 
the boarding of animals is limited to short term 
care incidental to the clinic or hospital use. 

Boarding House: A dwelling or part thereof in 
which lodging is provided by the owner or operator 
to more than four boarders. Where four or more 
unrelated individuals rent a dwelling, it shall be 
considered a boarding house. 

Business Daycare: An accessory school operated on 
a regular basis designed to provide daytime care or 
instruction of children five years of age and under. 
This service is limited to the employees of the firm 
sponsoring it, or the employees working in the 
structure where the business day care is located. 

Hazardous Material: Any substance which is listed 
in, but not limited to, the EPA Priority Pollutants 
as described in Section 307 (a) of the Clean Water 
Act, as amended. 

Impervious: Any area impenetrable by surface 
water. 



Kennel: An establishment in which more than 
three dogs or domesticated animals are housed, 
groomed, bred, boarded, trained or sold located on 
at least five (5) acres of land. 

Motor Vehicle Body Repair: An establishment, 
garage or work area enclosed within a building 
where repairs are made or caused to be made to 
motor vehicle bodies, including fenders, bumpers 
and similar components of motor vehicle bodies, 
but does not include the storage vehicles for the 
cannibalization of parts. 

Open Lot Storage: Outdoor storage of bulk goods 
and products for distribution but not for sale on the 
premises. 

Parking Garage: A structure which is accessory to 
a commercial or industrial establishment and is 
primarily for the parking and storage of vehicles 
operated by the customers, visitors and employees 
of such an establishment. 

Recharge Area: An area of geologic deposits 
through which water from the surface can infiltrate 
through the soil to the groundwater. These geologic 
deposits generally consist of stratified sand and 
gravels. 

Refuse Incinerator: An engineered apparatus with 
grate area in excess of ten square feet used to burn 
waste and in which all combustion factors, 
temperature, retention time, turbulence and com- 
bustion can be controlled which is approved by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health and 
the Chelmsford Board of Health. 

Salvage Yard: Property where motor vehicles are 
junked dismantled or stored for later dismantling 
or distribution. 

Sanitary Landfill: A site for solid waste disposal 
approved by the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health and the Chelmsford Board of 
Health. Disposal of raw sewage and similar waste 
items are not permitted. 

Solid Waste Disposal Facility: Refuse transfer sta- 
tion, composing plant, solid waste recycling opera- 
tion and any other works or use approved by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health and 
the Board of Health of the Town of Chelmsford for 
processing, handling, treating, and disposing of 
solid or liquid waste materials, including garbage, 
rubbish, junk, discarded bulk items, and sludges 
but not raw sewage, and similar waste items. 

Toxic Materials: A combination of pollutants in- 
cluding disease carrying agents, which after 
discharge and upon exposure, ingestion, inhala- 
tion, and assimilation into any organism can cause 
death, disease, mutations, deficiencies, or malfunc- 
tions in such organisms or their offspring. 



74 



UNDER ARTICLE 4 Planning Board Chairman, John 
McCarthy, moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by deleting the present Zon- 
ing Map and substituting the redrafted Map proposed by 
the Planning Board, as filed with the Town Clerk, enti- 
tled future land use/proposed zoning Map, Weston and 
Sampson Engineers, Inc., April 23, 1986 and displayed at 
the Town Meeting. 

John McCarthy then read the Planning Board's recom- 
mendation: The Planning Board conducted a Public 
Hearing on May 8, 1986 and voted to recommend in 
favor of this article. The vote 6-0. The Finance Commit- 
tee and the Board of Selectmen recommend the article. 
Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Chairman of the Planning 
Board, John McCarthy, moved that the Town vote to 
amend the zoning by-law of the Town of Chelmsford by 
adding the following Section 4700 Residential Cluster 
Development: 

4700. Residential Cluster Development 

4700. Intent. Residential Cluster Developments, 
hereinafter known as RCD, may be allowed by 
special permit by the Planning Board for the pur- 
pose of providing attractive, convenient, efficient 
neighborhoods and to promote the conservation 
of open space and the efficient use of land in har- 
mony with its natural features. 

4710. Minimum Size of Development. The tract of 
land proposed for an RCD shall contain 10 acres 
or shall have the minimal capacity for ten (10) 
dwelling units computed in accordance with this 
ordinance, whichever is greater. These proposals 
shall be permitted only within a subdivision as 
defined in Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws. 



4711. Maximum Number of Dwelling Units in a 
RCD. The maximum number dwelling units in 
an RCD shall not exceed the number computed 
as follows: 

A. Land unsuitable for development, as herein 
defined, shall first be deducted from the tract 
proposed for development. 

B. The remaining land in the tract shall be 
divided by the minimum lot size for the ap- 
plicable zoning district. 

Proposed tract of land - Unsuitable land = 

Maximum number of 

Minimum Lot Size dwelling 

units 

C. In no case shall the number of dwelling units 
permitted in the RCD exceed the number of 
which would have been permitted in the Zon- 



ing District(s) in which the tract lies if 
developed in the conventional manner. 

4712. Land Unsuitable for Development 

A. Eighty (80) percent of the wetlands as defined 
in Chapter 131, Section 40 A of the 
Massachusetts General Laws as amended. 

B. Eighty (80) percent of the land located within 
a flood plain. 

C. Eighty (80) percent of the land unable to 
receive septic system approval by the Board of 
Health. 

4713. Restriction on Location of Structures. If any 

part of a dwelling or accessory building in an 
RCD is proposed to be located within 100 feet of 
the perimeter of such Development, such build- 
ing^) shall be located so as to comply with the 
minimum yard dimensions for principal and ac- 
cessory buildings for the applicable zoning 
district. 

4714. Minimum Lot Area. 

A. Minimum lot area: 20,000 sq. ft. 
Frontage: 50 ft. 

Side Yard: 12ft. 

Front Yard: 20 ft. 

Rear Yard: 20 ft. 

4720. Subdivision Approval Required. No part of the 
construction of an RCD shall begin until the plan 
of such Development has been granted final ap- 
proval by the Planning Board in accordance with 
the Subdivision Regulations. The developer shall 
submit with the request for an RCD an alternate 
plan(s) for developing the site as a conventional 
subdivision at the presubmission review and 
preliminary plan stages of the Subdivision process 
which shall adhere to all subdivision require- 
ments. The Planning Board may establish addi- 
tional rules and regulations to govern the RCD 
and the filing of additional material or informa- 
tion. 

4730. General Requirements 

A. RCD's are permitted only in Residential 
Districts. The Planning Board shall not ap- 
prove a cluster development in an established 
single family neighborhood where in their 
determination, such land use will be inconsis- 
tent with or will have a detrimental effect 
upon the surrounding property. If the Plan- 
ning Board denies an RCD based on this sec- 
tion they shall identify this as the reason for 
denial. 

B. The minimum frontage of the parcel for 
development proposals shall be at least fifty 



75 



feet in all residential districts. Additional 
frontage may be required if more than one 
access road is deemed necessary by the Plan- 
ning Board. 

C. All streets in an RCD shall be improved in ac- 
cordance with the requirements and specifi- 
cations of the Subdivision Regulations. 
Driveways and other paved areas intended to 
remain in private ownership shall be ap- 
proved as to design and construction stan- 
dards by the Planning Board. 

D. A written agreement or contract to be ex- 
ecuted between the developer and the Town 
of Chelsmford shall be submitted at the final 
stage of the Subdivision review stating: 

1. That the owner or developer will con- 
struct the development and install im- 
provements both public and private in 
accordance with the approved plan. A 
bond shall be posted to guarantee com- 
pletion. 

2 . That in the event of failure of the owners, 
successors, or assigns to maintain any 
common open space, recreation areas, 
landscaping features or other required 
improvements the Town may enter said 
development and perform such necessary 
maintenance work and charge the cost, 
including attorney fees to the owner, suc- 
cessor, or assigns. 

3. That this contract shall be binding upon 
the heirs, assigns, successors or receivers 
of the development and shall constitute a 
lien on the property in the development. 

4. Any other conditions required by the 
Planning Commission. 

E. A site plan, in addition to the final Subdivi- 
sion Plan, shall be recorded after the RCD is 
approved. As a minimum this site plan shall 
show the whole development indicating lots, 
roads, easements, open space, phases for 
development, any recreational uses or 
buildings to be constructed in the open space 
and any ponds, streams or wetlands. This 
plan shall be approved by the Planning Board 
before it is recorded. 

4740. Open Space 

A. No less than 25 percent of the total land area 
of an RCD, shall be open space. This land 
shall not include building lots, street rights- 
of-way, or facilities or land which is 
designated by Section 4712 as being un- 
suitable for development. 



B. At least one-half of the open space (or 12.5 
percent of the total land area) shall be usable 
for active recreation. 

C. Provisions shall be made to ensure that no 
more than 20 percent of the open space (5 
percent of the total area) shall be devoted to 
paved areas and structures devoted to recrea- 
tional uses or uses accessory to permitted uses. 

D. Use of the open space as permitted in 
paragraph (H) shall be subject to site plan 
review by the Planning Board. All structural 
improvements shall be a part of the final sub- 
mission plans approved by the Board, or may 
be included by amendment at any time prior 
to the conveyance of the first lot. Following 
the conveyance of at least 75 percent of the 
lots; such improvements may be permitted by 
the Board with the written concurrence of at 
least two-thirds (%) of the homeowner asso- 
ciation membership. No structure on the 
open space may be located within fifty (50 ') 
feet of residential property abutting the RCD. 

E. Strips of open space shall be permitted only as 
usable access paths between residences, 
streets, other open space areas, as drainage 
areas, and as buffers. 

F. Access areas to the open space shall be clearly 
marked with appropriate materials to 
distinguish open space area from private pro- 
perty. 

G. Open space may be in one or more parcels, 
the size, location, shape and character of 
which must be suitable for the designated 
uses. 

H. Open space may be used for active recreation, 
passive recreation, conservation, forestry, 
agriculture, natural buffers, open space, 
structures accessory to approved uses in- 
cluding septic systems and package sewage 
treatment facilities. No open space area shall 
be used for the disposal of stumps, stones or 
other fill resulting from the construction of 
the improvements of the RCD. 

I. Land which has been environmentally 
damaged prior to final approval of the 
development by the Planning Board as a 
result of soil and earth removal operations, 
harvesting of trees or other natural features or 
refuse disposal or other causes shall not be ac- 
cepted as common open space unless and un- 
til the land is restored to a condition which 
the Planning Board determines to be reason- 
able and appropriate to effectuate the pur- 
pose of this Article. The Planning Board may 
grant final approval for an RCD subject to 



76 



such restoration of the common open space 
provided an appropriate performance bond is 
posted. 

4750. Ownership of Common Open Space 

A. The required open space shall be owned in 
common by all the landowners in the plat. 
The deed to each lot shall include a fractional 
interest in the common open space in an 
amount proportionate to the number of lots 
in the plat. The deed shall also include any 
covenants, restrictions, or easements atached 
to the RCD, each lot, or the common open 
space and any homeowners' association 
agreements pertaining thereto. 

B. Open space shall be protected against 
building development and environmental 
damage by conveying to the Town a conserva- 
tion restriction pursuant to Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 84, Section 31-33 
which shall be enforceable by the Conserva- 
tion Commission. 

4760. Maintenance of Open Space — Homeowners' 
Association 

A. The applicant or developer shall provide for 
and establish a Homeowners' Association as a 
non-profit organization or other legal entity 
under the laws of Massachusetts for the use, 
care and maintenance of all such lands and 
improvements. Membership in the association 
shall be mandatory for all landowners within 
the RCD, and each lot shall be entitled to 
equal representation. The association shall be 
formed prior to conveyance of the first lot. 
The assessment of dues and/or fees for struc- 
tural improvements requires the affirmative 
vote of no less than two- thirds (%) of the 
homeowner association membership. 

B. Such organization shall be created by 
covenants and restrictions running with the 
land and shall be composed of all persons 
having ownership within the development. 
Such organizations shall be responsible for the 
perpetuation, maintenance and function of 
all common lands, uses and facilities. 

C. All lands and improvements shall be de- 
scribed and identified as to location, size, use 
and control in a restrictive covenant, and 
such covenant shall set forth the method of 
assessment for the maintenance of such land. 
These restrictive covenants shall be written so 
as to run with the land. These covenants shall 
become part of the deed to each lot or parcel 
within the development. 

D. Such restrictive covenant and organization 



shall continue in effect so as to control the 
availability of the facilities and land thereby 
provided, to maintain the land and facilities 
for their intended function, and to protect the 
development from additional and unplanned 
densities of use. Such organization shall not 
be dissolved without the prior approval of the 
Planning Board, nor shall such organization 
dispose of any common open space, by sale or 
otherwise, except to an organization con- 
ceived and organized to own and/or maintain 
the common open space and approved by the 
Planning Board. 

E. The Homeowners' Association shall be 
responsible for guaranteeing that no land in 
common open space shall be used or dis- 
turbed in any manner inconsistent with the 
uses and intent of this Article. 

F. In the event the Association fails to maintain 
any common open space, recreation area, 
landscaping area, or other improvements, in- 
cluding private roadways, drainage systems 
and so on, the Town of Chelmsford may enter 
into said development and perform the 
necessary maintenance work and charge the 
cost, including attorney fees to the associa- 
tion. 

G. Notwithstanding any provision of the 
covenants establishing a Homeowners' Associ- 
ation, ultimate legal liability and respons- 
ibility for the use and maintenance of the 
common open space shall rest with the in- 
dividual lot owners, and any legal notices con- 
cerning the common open space which are 
sent by the Town may be directed to the in- 
dividual lot owners or the Homeowners' 
Association. 

4770. Homeowners' Association 

A. Before an applicant or developer can 
establish a non-profit organization as re- 
quired in Section 4760 in addition to all other 
required recommendations, the following 
documents shall be submitted to and ap- 
proved by the Planning Board: 

1. The articles of association or other 
organizational documentation for the 
non-profit organization; 

2. The by-laws of the non-profit organiza- 
tion and a list of officers and their terms 
of office; 

3. The covenants or restrictions related to 
the use of common property, including 
the system and amounts of assessments 
for perpetuation and maintenance; 



77 



4. A document granting the rights of entry 
upon such common property to Town of- 
ficials, law enforcement officers, rescue 
personnel and fire fighting personnel 
while in pursuit of their duties; 

5. A time schedule for the maintenance of 
major facilities, including streets not ac- 
cepted into the town highway system, 
private street signs and sidewalks, park- 
ing area improvements, buildings, pools 
and other common areas; 

6. A copy of the Deed of Conveyance and 
Title of Certificate, where applicable, for 
all lands proposed to be conveyed to the 
Town or other appropriate governmental 
agency; 

7. A plan of the transfer of control of the 
common open space from the developer 
to the Homeowners' Association; 

8. A copy of any management policies or 
proposed management policies for the 
whole development or common open 
space. 

B. Each original purchaser of a lot in the 
Residential Cluster Development (RCD) must 
be given by the developer a copy of all 
documents outlined in the above paragraph. 

C. The Planning Board may require the 
developer to submit a fiscal program for a 
maximum of ten (10) years, including ade- 
quate reserve funds for the maintenance and 
care of all lands, streets, facilities, and uses 
under the purview of the Homeowners' 
organization. 

D. The documents set forth above shall be 
reviewed and approved by the Planning 
Board, and such approval shall be obtained 
before the final plat is approved. The articles 
of association or other organizational 
documentation shall be filed with the ap- 
propriate state agency prior to obtaining final 
approval by the Planning Board. Such 
documents, once approved, shall be recorded 
in the Registry of Deeds. 

4780. Required Certificates or Documents. In addi- 
tion to the requirements of Section 4770, the 
following certificates or documents shall be sub- 
mitted in accordance with the Subdivision 
Regulations. 

A. Copies of any proposed management policies 
and existing or proposed deed restrictions or 
covenants running with the land in the 
development. 



B. A description of any existing easement, 
covenants, or restrictions affecting land 
within the development and an instrument 
conveying any easements required as condi- 
tion of approval to the Town. Such easements 
shall include that which is required by Section 
4750. Item B. 

C. The following disclosure shall be required: 

1 . Prior to approval by the Planning Board, 
the developer must file and have approval 
by the Planning Board a sample Purchase 
and Sale Agreement which shall be used 
for the purchase of individual lots and 
dwellings. Said Agreement shall include 
in conspicuous type the following; 

that the property is part of an RCD sub- 
ject to the Zoning Bylaw and the Subdivi- 
sion Regulations of the Town of 
Chelmsford; that the purchaser and 
subsequent owners of the property are 
subject to the requirements therein con- 
tained; that the purchaser shall be re- 
quired to be a member of a Homeowners' 
Association, shall be subject to rules and 
regulations of said Association and shall 
be liable for any applicable assessment 
made by or against said Association and 
that the ultimate liability for the open 
space falls on the individual lot owner. 
The Purchase and Sale Agreement shall 
further contain a statement by the seller 
that the purchaser has been provided 
with a copy of the documents as required 
in Section 4770 and a prospectus which 
shall be a summarization in layman's 
language of the information contained in 
the other documents; 

Planning Board Chairman, John McCarthy, read the 
Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board conducted a public hearing on 
May 8, 1986, and voted to recommend in favor of this ar- 
ticle. The vote was 6-0. 

A question was asked concerning cluster zoning. Tom 
Delia of Weston and Sampson explained the zoning. The 
Board of Selectman and Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, which left the Chair in doubt. The tellers came for- 
ward and a hand count was taken: Yes 176, No 37 a %'s 
vote required of 142, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Planning Board Chairman, John 
McCarthy, moved that the Town vote to amend the zon- 
ing by-law of the Town of Chelmsford by adding the 
following section 4800. Aquifer Protection District. 

4800. Aquifer Protection District 



78 



4810. Purpose. The purpose of an Aquifer Protection 
District, hereinafter known as APD, is to protect 
the public drinking water supply and the public 
health by preventing the contamination of 
Chelmsford's groundwater. 

4820. Aquifer Protection District. The APD is 

established as an overlay district to the Town's 
zoning map. This APD was defined by the sur- 
ficial geology of the area and groundwater flow 
(based on a U.S. Geological Survey Surficial 
Geology Map and the Chelmsford Facilities Plan 
by Weston & Sampson Engineers, Inc.). Any area 
in which groundwater flow is directed toward a 
well and the surficial geology is stratified sand 
and gravel deposits (soils which yield ground- 
water to wells) is included in the APD. 

If a property owner questions the location of any 
boundary of an APD, the owner may engage at 
his own cost a professional hydrogeologist or soils 
engineer who must be approved by the Planning 
Board of the Town, to determine if the land in 
question is a recharge area. 

4830. Use Regulations. The use schedule for all zoning 
districts shall apply, except as modified in this 
section. In all cases the more stringent provision 
shall apply. 

4831. The following uses are prohibited within the 
APD: 

A. The manufacture, use storage, transport, or 
disposal of toxic or hazardous materials as a 
principal activity. 

B. Solid waste disposal facility, sanitary landfill, 
refuse incinerator, salvage yard, junk yard, 
storage yard, road salt stockpile. 

C. Truck/bus terminals and contractor's yards 
with more than 10 vehicles, service station 
and auto repair shops. 

D. Car washes, or coin-operated and commercial 
laundries, where not connected to public 
sewers. 

E. Subsurface storage of toxic or hazardous 
materials, fuel oil or gasoline. 

F. Solid waste disposal or sewage treatment 
facilities with onsite disposal of the effluent, 
unless tertiary treatment is used. 

4832. The following uses require a Special Permit from 
the Planning Board within the APD: 

A. Above ground storage of more than 500 
gallons of toxic or hazardous materials, fuel 
oil or gasoline. 



B. Any residential use with a lot size less than the 
intensity use schedule requires for that par- 
ticular residential zone. 

C. Any use except for residential with an 
estimated sewage disposal greater than 10 
gallons of sewage per day per 1,000 square 
feet of lot area, based on Title V of the State 
Environmental Code, 310 CMR 15.00. 

D. Any use which renders impervious more than 
50 percent of the total lot area. 

4840. Special Permits. Special Permits may be granted 
by the Planning Board, if the requirements of the 
APD are met and if the granting of such a permit 
follows the general intent of the zoning bylaw. 
Prior to granting a special permit, the Planning 
Board shall review the proposed control measures 
and shall determine if these control measures are 
adequate with respect to possible groundwater 
contamination if a failure occurred. If the Plann- 
ing Board denies a special permit, the reason for 
the denial must be stated. After receiving a 
special permit application, the Planning Board 
shall distribute one copy each to the Board of 
Health, the Conservation Commission and the 
Building Inspector for their review. If a response 
is not received within 35 days by these agencies, 
the Planning Board will assume the agency ap- 
prove. A special permit may be granted by the 
Planning Board, if, after review of the applica- 
tions and comments from the Board of Health, 
the Conservation Commission and the Building 
Inspector, the Planning Board finds that the 
groundwater quality will not fall below state or 
federal drinking water standards, or if the 
groundwater quality is below these standards no 
further degradation of the groundwaters will oc- 



4841. Special Permit Application. Eleven (11) copies 
of the Special Permit Application shall be sub- 
mitted to the Planning Board in accordance with 
Section 1250. In addition, the application shall 
include: 

A. A complete list of all fuels, chemicals, 
pesticides, and other potentially toxic or 
hazardous materials which are being used or 
stored on the premises in quantities greater 
than average household use. 

B. Detailed plans shall be submitted of the 
storage tank or pipeline being used to store or 
transport the toxic or hazardous materials, 
fuels, chemicals or pesticides. These plans 
should also show how the storage tank or 
pipeline is protected from corrosion, leaks, 
spills, and vandalism. 

C. Evidence of qualified professional supervision 
of the design and installation of above and 



79 



below ground storage of toxic and hazardous 
materials. 

D. Evidence of qualified professional supervision 
of the design and installation for any use with 
an estimated sewage flow greater than 1,000 
gpd (other than single family). Impacts of 
nitrates, chlorides, and coliforms on ground- 
water quality must also be addressed; 

Tom Delia of Weston and Sampson explained that this 
by-law was to protect the ground water in the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

Chairman of the Planning Board, John McCarthy read 
the Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board conducted a public hearing on 
May 8, 1986 and voted to recommend in favor of this arti- 
cle. The vote was 4-2. 

The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Moderator attempted a 
voice vote, which left the chair in doubt, the tellers came 
forward and a hand count was taken: Yes 227, No 19, a 
%'s vote of 164 is required, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman John P. Emerson 
moved to amend the article by amending the figure to 
read $1.00 instead of $6,000.00 Selectman Emerson ex- 
plained the purpose of the article. The Finance Commit- 
tee was in favor of the amendment. Richard O'Neil ques- 
tion the presence of a quorum. (300 voters present are 
needed to conduct a Special Town Meeting). The tellers 
came forward and counted the voters: 280 voters present. 
Selectman Emerson moved to adjourn the Special Town 
Meeting until Thursday May 15th, 1986 at 7:30 PM. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, a discussion took place 



concerning the night chosen. Selectman Emerson ex- 
plained that the Town Clerk Mary E. St. Hilaire, would 
be unavailable for a meeting other than Thursday, May 
15th. Edward Hilliard moved to adjourn the meeting un- 
til Monday May 19th 1986 at 8:00 PM to the McCarthy 
Jr. High Gymnasium. The Moderator explained that the 
Town Clerk and Ass't Town Clerk were scheduled to be 
attending an out of Town seminar. More discussion took 
place, The Town Clerk was going to still attend the 
seminar and the Assistant would attend the Town 
Meeting. Selectmen recommend the motion. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. The 
Special Town Meeting adjourned at 10:55 PM until 8:00 
PM Monday May 19th. The Moderator reconvened the 
Adjourned Annual Town Meeting at 10:56 PM. 

Lennart Leedberg attempted to have Article 34 
brought back onto the floor for re-consideration, 
However George Ripsom, of the Finance Committee 
moved to adjourned the Annual Town Meeting until 
Monday May 19th, 1986 at 7:30 PM to the McCarthy Jr. 
High Gymnasium. The Moderator explained that this is 
the motion which must be acted upon first. Mr. Leedberg 
could ask the Town Meeting Body to defeat the motion to 
adjourn and then his motion would be put before the 
Town Meeting Body for consideration, if the meeting 
does not adjourn. Once the meeting adjourns then Arti- 
cle 34 can not be brought up again at a later meeting. 
The Moderator attempted a voice vote, which left the 
chair in doubt, he asked for a show of hands, still in 
doubt the tellers came forward and conducted a hand 
count. Yes 142, No 100 Motion carried. 

The meeting adjourned until Monday May 19th, 1986 
7:30 PM at the McCarthy Jr. High Gymnasium. The 
meeting adjourned at 11:05 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



80 



ADJOURNED 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



ADJOURNED 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



May 19, 1986 



May 19, 1986 



The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at the McCarthy Jr. High School Gymnasium at 
7:40 PM, by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 316 
voters present. 

The Moderator addressed the Town Meeting Body 
with a few announcements. George Ripsom who is a 
member of the Finance Committee and has been a 
member for quite a few years, is being transfered to 
Washington D.C. and will be resigning from the Finance 
Committee. The Moderator thanked Mr. Ripsom for his 
years of service. Also Assessor Janet Lombard is confined 
to her home with a serious illness and cards/ acknow- 
ledgements should be sent to her. 

UNDER ARTICLE 35 Bertha Sadowski moved to 
amend the article to read to change from Single 
Residence (RB) to Roadside Commercial District (CB) 
The motion was submitted as changing from RB to CD. 
Attorney James Geary, representing Bertha Sadowski ex- 
plained the reason for the amendment. A discussion took 
place, a number of voters spoke for and against the mo- 
tion to amend. Bertha Sadowski spoke about the article 
and asked for support from the Town Meeting body. The 
Moderator asked for the Planning Board's recommenda- 
tion. Chairman of the Planning Board, John McCarthy, 
read the Board's recommendation: The Planning Board 
conducted a Public Hearing on March 26, 1986 and 
voted to recommend in favor of the amending of this arti- 
cle to CB (Roadside Commercial District). The vote was 
6-0. Although this article is not part of the Master Plan, 
the rezoning is consistent with the intent of the Master 
Plan. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend. Motion carried. More discussion took place 
under the main motion as amended. Brad Emerson 
moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator attempted a voice vote on 
the main motion as amended, Chair left in doubt, the 
following tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken: Yes 125, No 128 the motion is defeated, (see war- 
rant for original wording of the article) 

The Moderator at this time moved to recess the 
meeting due to the Special Town Meeting being ad- 
journed from the May 12th, 1986 meeting to take place 
on May 19th, 1986 at 8:00 PM. Meeting adjourned at 
8:09 PM. 



The Moderator attempted to reconvene the adjourned 
session of the Special Town Meeting at 8:10 PM, 
however, James Brough questioned the presence of a 
quorum. (300 voters present in order to conduct a 
meeting) The tellers came forward and counted the 
voters present. There were 290 voters present, the 
Moderator postponed the Special Town Meeting until 
later during this session of the Town Meeting to 9:00 PM. 

The Moderator moved to reconvene the recessed An- 
nual Town Meeting at 8:15 PM. 

Bertha Sadowski moved to reconsider Article 35. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen do not 
recommend the motion. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 36 Selectman Ready, moved to 
amend the article by adding the words, provided 
however, that the property shown as owned by N/F Bell, 
N/F Anderson, and N/F Pappas as shown on said plan 
shall only be acquired with said owners consent. 

A Discussion took place. The Board of Selectmen were 
split two and two on recommending or not recommen- 
ding the article. Selectmen Emerson and Ready spoke in 
favor of the amendment and the article. Selectmen 
Johnson and Blomgren were both against passage of the 
article. Selectmen Emerson and Ready felt that the only 
way the Town of Chelmsford could excise any type of 
control on the situation was to take the land by eminent 
domain and declare it for public use. Selectmen Johnson 
felt that the Town should send a message to Lowell, say- 
ing that we do not want any part of this waste treatment 
plant. Selectmen Blomgren felt the same way. The Town 
couldn't be sure of what could be buried on the site, by 
means of hazardous wastes etc. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on Selectman Ready's motion to amend, mo- 
tion defeated. More discussion took place Leo Paradis 
moved to amend the article by inserting near the end of 
the fifth paragraph after the word disposal the following, 
"as determined by a two-thirds vote of the Blue Ribbon 
Resource Recovery committee". More lengthy discussion 
took place. Daniel Burke of the Blue Ribbon Resource 
Recovery Committee, spoke about the article. He ex- 
plained that the Committee felt that the Town should 
take the land, the company doesn't necessarily need the 
land for the ashes. They can be taken elsewhere, but in 
order for the Town to have any say whatsoever in the 
matter the land should be taken by the Town. Scott 
Prescott moved the question. The Moderator asked if 
there was any need to hear further debate? Hearing none 
he asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend. Motion 
defeated. The Moderator read another motion from Elias 
Safdie: Delete the words "adequate municipal trash 
disposal" and insert recreational use. He felt that if the 
land was taken it could only be used for this purpose only. 



81 



Discussion followed. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to amend. Motion defeated. Town 
Counsel James Harrington was asked different questions 
concerning the article, he explained that he could only 
advise and give opinions. Elizabeth Marshall Chairman 
of the Finance Committee, moved to amend the article. 
By adding the following to the last paragraph: "Acquisi- 
tion of this property shall be contingent upon the success- 
ful outcome of a Chapter 21E (existing Environmental 
Condition) study on this property." The Selectmen ex- 
plained that this was an automatic provision that would 
have to take place before the land could be purchased. 
Barry Balan asked if a Representative from BFI 
(Browning-Farris, Industries) could have permission from 
the Moderator/ Town Meeting Body to come forward and 
answer questions. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried. Richard McEwen came forward and 
answered questions. He said that the City of Lowell was 
going to put the waste treatment plant on the Lowell site, 
regardless what happened with this article. Other alter- 
natives were made on where to bring the ash to, if the 
Town of Chelmsford did not participate. More discussion 
took place. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to amend, left the chair in doubt, a show of hands 
was taken. Motion carried, to amend the last paragraph. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the main motion 
as amended, motion defeated. Harry Foster questioned 
the vote, the tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken: Yes 57, No 132 the motion was defeated, (see the 
warrant for original wording of the article) 

The Moderator moved to reconvene the postponed 
Special Town Meeting at 10:35 PM, he asked the tellers 
to come forward and count the number of voters present. 
There were 192 voters present. Selectman Emerson 
moved to adjourn the Special Town Meeting until Tues- 
day May 27th at 8:00 PM at the McCarthy Jr. High 
School Gymnasium. Motion carried. 

The Moderator made a point of order that the Town 
Meeting would now proceed with the articles that were 
postponed to the conclusion of the Special Town 
Meeting. Edward Hilliard questioned this saying that the 
Special Town Meeting hasn't ended yet, just postponed to 
another night and felt that the articles couldn't be acted 
on tonight. The Moderator asked Town Counsel for an 
opinion. The Finance Committee when questioned by the 
Moderator said that they did have the figures available 
for discussion if need be. While waiting for Town 
Counsel's opinion, Samuel Poulten, questioned the Tues- 
day night adjournment. He said that the School Commit- 
tee was scheduled to meet that night. Mr. Poulten was in- 
formed that no other board can meet while Town 
Meeting is in process. Town Counsel James Harrington 
informed the Moderator after reading the minutes of the 
previous Town Meeting that the motion read at the con- 
clusion of the Special Town Meeting. Therefore no action 
could take place on the postponed articles until after the 
conclusion of the Special Town Meeting which was 
scheduled for Tuesday May 27th, 8:00 PM. Selectman 
John Emerson moved to adjourn the Annual Town 
Meeting until Tuesday May 27th, 1986 at 7:30 PM. Larry 
Cunningham spoke against the motion he felt that there 



was enough time left at this meeting to continue. Samuel 
Poulten again spoke against the motion to adjourn the 
Annual Town Meeting to Tuesday Night due to the 
School Committee having a meeting scheduled. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to ad- 
journ the meeting until Tuesday May 27th, which left the 
chair in doubt, he then asked for a show of hands, motion 
defeated. The meeting continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 37 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of thirty-five thousand dollars ($35,000.00) and/or 
for the purpose of completing Architectual Design and 
securing all necessary plans and specification for the con- 
struction and/ or reconstruction of the front portion of 
the firestation located on North Road, along with the 
performance all said all construction and/or reconstruc- 
tion in conformity with said plans, all said contracts to be 
made under the supervision of the Chief of the Fire 
Department. 

Acting Chief James Sousa stated that according to his 
information from former Fire Chief Reid, the Fire 
Department did not submit this article. Therefore he did 
not have any information concerning it. Richard Lahue 
stated that the Fire Department had purchased a new fire 
truck and when found that it would not fit in the station, 
a nitch was formed in order for the truck to fit. The Fire 
Station falls within the Historic District, and the Board 
did not give any permission for any reconstruction to the 
station. He asked the Town Meeting Body to dismiss the 
article by voting to defeat it. 

William Dalton moved to amend the article: to use the 
sum of $35,000.00 to reconstruct the upper portion of the 
center fire house. He said that more office space and a 
ladies room was needed, and that this is where the monies 
should be applied to. Town Counsel was asked if this mo- 
tion was considered out of order. Town Counsel replied 
no because the warrant says with reconstruction as does 
the motion to amend. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to amend. Motion defeated. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the main motion, 
motion defeated. 

Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., moved to adjourn the 
Town Meeting until Tuesday May 27, 1986 at 7:30 PM to 
the McCarthy Jr. High Gymnasium. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote which left the chair in doubt. He 
then asked for a show of hands, motion carried. The 
meeting adjourned at 11:00 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



82 



ADJOURNED 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 27, 1986 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at the McCarthy Jr. High Gymnasium at 7:40 PM, 
by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 217 voters present. 

Moderator Dennis McHugh announced to the Town 
Meeting body, that he felt that the next article would per- 
tain to the office of the Moderator. Due to this, he was 
going to step down and allow a temporary Moderator 
conduct the meeting through this article only. Town 
Clerk Mary St. Hilaire, moved to nominate James Harr- 
ington, Town Counsel, as Temporary Moderator, for Ar- 
ticle 38 only. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried. Town Clerk Mary St. Hilaire, swore in Tem- 
porary Moderator James Harrington, and the meeting 
continued. , 

UNDER ARTICLE 38 James Brough, moved that the 
Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Article 
II — Town Meeting, by deleting Section 5 Finance Com- 
mittee, in its entirety and substituting the following in its 
place. 

Section 5 Finance Committee 

1. The Finance Committee in the Town of 
Chelmsford shall be composed of seven members to 
be elected at the Annual Town Election. 

2. The election of said members shall be as follows: 

(a) All current member shall continue to serve until 
June 30, 1987, at which time all said positions 
shall be abolished. 

(b) All positions shall be elected in the Town of 
Chelmsford 1987 Annual Town election to take 
office on July 1, 1987: 

(c) The initial positions on said Committee shall be 
elected as follows: 



(e) The moderator shall have the power to make in- 
term appointments to said Finance Committee 
when an elected and/or appointment becomes 
vacant. Said interm appointment shall serve until 
the next Annual Town election, at which point, 
the position for the balance of the term of said 
position shall be subject to election. 

3. Copies of the Finance Committee report, including 
the Warrant for each Annual Town Meeting shall 
be made available by the Finance Committee to 
registered voters of record not less than two weeks 
prior to the meeting. 

James Brough explained the purpose of the article. He 
felt that the Finance Committee should be an elected 
body, that way they would have to answer publicly for 
their decisions on budgets/ articles. Presently the 
Moderator appoints the Finance Committee, Mr. Brough 
felt that this was a lot of power for one person to be 
responsible for. He felt that the voters should have the say 
by way of electing the individuals. A discussion took 
place. The Finance Committee when asked did not want 
to recommend one way or the other, however, Elizabeth 
Marshall wanted to give a few points of information. The 
Finance Committee commits themselves to a lot of 
volunteer hours. They take quite seriously the respon- 
sibility of preparing the warrant book and recommenda- 
tions. If the voters do not agree with the Finance Com- 
mittee's recommendations, then they simply do not vote 
for the article. The people who serve on the Committee 
are a neutral group. The Finance Committee is not con- 
sidered a stepping stone to higher offices, therefore only 
personal achievement not political can be gained. The 
Board of Selectmen were not in favor of the article. 
Selectmen Blomgren gave the recommendation. A 
discussion took place, Edward Hilliard and James Decker 
spoke against the article and asked for it to be defeated. 
William Drury moved the question to stop debate. The 
Temporary Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. He then asked for a voice vote on the 
article, motion defeated. 

Moderator Dennis McHugh returned to the podium 
and recessed the Annual Town Meeting at this time in 
order to conduct the postponed Special Town Meeting, 
which was scheduled for 8:00 PM. 



(1) Two positions for a period of three (3) years 
each; 

(2) Three positions for a period of two (2) years 
each; 

(3) Two positions for a period of one (1) year 
each. 

(d) Each of the positions shall be subject to election 
at the end of the above terms as stated in subsec- 
tion (C); and, thereafter each position shall have 
a term of three (3) years. 



ADJOURNED 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 27, 1986 

The Moderator Dennis McHugh called the meeting to 
order at 8:01 PM he recognized the presence of a 
quorum. A discussion took place concerning the impor- 
tance of the articles left that needed to be voted on. Ed- 
ward Quinn questioned the presence of a quorum. A 
discussion took place. Edward Quinn withdrew his mo- 
tion. Selectman Dennis Ready moved to take Article 13 



83 



and 14 out of order. The Finance Committee was against 
the motion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, which 
left the chair in doubt, he asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. 
moved to amend the article to read $1.00. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the main motion as amended, 
motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as 
follows: 

Selectman John P. Emerson moved that the Town vote 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and 
all temporary and/or permanent easements and any pro- 
perty in fee simple, by purchase, by eminent domain or 
otherwise on the property described as Parcel C on a cer- 
tain plan on file with the Town Engineer entitled "Ease- 
ment Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Ma. prepared for the 
Town of Chelmsford, Scale l"-40', March 10, 1986, by 
Vanasse/Hangen Engineering, Inc., Consulting Engin- 
eers and Planners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, Boston, 
Massachusetts" for the purpose of construction im- 
provements, widening, laying out and accepting said por- 
tion of Mill Road and I move that the Town vote to 
transfer and appropriate from free cash the sum of one 
dollar ($1.00) to defray all necessary costs, fees and ex- 
penses in connection with the acquisition of said land and 
for paying any damages which may be awarded as the 
result of any such taking. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary and/or per- 
manent easements, and any property in fee simple, by 
purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, on the pro- 
perty described as Parcel 1 on a certain plan on file with 
the Town Engineer entitled "Easement Plan of land in 
Chelmsford, Ma. prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Scale l"-40', October 29, 1984, by Vanasse/Hangen 
Engineering, Inc., Consulting Engineers and Planners, 
60 Birmingham Parkway, Boston, Massachusetts' for the 
purpose of construction improvements, widening, laying 
out and accepting said portion of Billerica Road and to I 
move that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate, 
from free cash the sum of one dollar ($1.00) to defray all 
necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with the 
acquisition of said land and for paying any damages 
which may be awarded as the result of any such taking. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. Scott 
Prescott asked questions concerning the construction. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. The Board of Selectmen recom- 
mended the article. A discussion took place. Scott 
Prescott questioned the presence of a quorum. More 
discussion took place, the Moderator moved for a five 
minute recess. The Meeting adjourned at 8:20 PM. The 



Moderator reconvened the Special Town Meeting at 8:25 
PM, Scott Prescott withdrew his motion of questioning 
the quorum. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on Ar- 
ticle 9, motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as 
follows: 

Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. moved that the Town 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any 
and all temporary and/or permanent easements, and any 
property in fee simple, by purchase, by eminent domain 
or otherwise, on the property described as Parcel 8 on a 
certain plan on file with the Town Engineer entitled 
"Easement Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Ma. prepared 
for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale l"-40', March 10, 
1986, by Vanasse/Hangen Engineering, Inc., Consulting 
Engineers and Planners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, 
Boston, Masschusetts" for the purpose of construction im- 
provements, widening, laying out and accepting said por- 
tion of Billerica Road and I move that the Town vote to 
transfer and appropriate, from free cash the sum of one 
dollar ($1.00) to defray all necessary costs, fees and ex- 
penses in connection with the acquisition of said land and 
for paying any damages which may be awarded as the 
result of any such taking. 

Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., moved to take Articles 
13 and 14 out of order. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate 
the sum of $36,713.00 from funds received from the 
Federal Government as partical reimbursement from 
hurricane "Gloria" expenses and to transfer and ap- 
propriate the sum of $12,211.00 from Line Item 139. 
Unemployment Benefits Due State to the following 
departmental line items and Trust Fund account. 



Cemetery Department: 
12. Salaries 

Public Buildings 
76. Salaries 

Highway Department 
41. Expenses 

Conservation Trust Fund 



$ 7,600.00 

187.00 

36,537.00 
4,600.00 



The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate 
the sum of $19,000.00 from Line Item 139 Unemploy- 
ment Benefits — State for the purpose of a continuing 
Traffic Study and Engineering Design to alleviate traffic 
problems on Chelmsford Street from Fletcher Street to 
the Chelmsford Mall. 

The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee 
recommended the article. Motion Carried, unanimously. 



84 



UNDER ARTICLE 10 Larry Cunningham questioned 
the presence of a quorum. The following tellers came for- 
ward and a count of the voters present was taken: 



Jocelyn Anthony 
Estelle Decker 
Jane Drury 
John Warren 
Normand LeBrecque 



Donald Elias 
Edward Hilliard 
Jack Peters 
William Drury 
Jean Horgan 



There were 190 voters present. Selectman Emerson 
moved to dissolve the Special Town Meeting. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. John 
Carson moved to adjourn the Special Town Meeting until 
later during the evening, to 9:15 PM. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, which left the chair in doubt, he 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. The Special 
Town Meeting adjourned. The Annual Town Meeting 
reconvened at 8:45 PM. 

Selectman Emerson moved to take Articles 9, 19, 20, 
22, and 24, out of order. The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectman recommended the motion. Edward 
Hilliard questioned the motion. Town Counsel James 
Harrington ruled that the motion is in order. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee, Elizabeth Marshall, moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of three hundred thousand 
dollars ($300,000.00) to be used as a Reserve Fund at the 
discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of forty thousand dollars ($40,000.00) for the pur- 
pose of completing Engineering Design and securing all 
necessary plans and specifications for implementation of 
Traffic Design at Summer Street and Boston Road, and 
further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to complete 
all applications and take all necessary steps to apply for 
Federal and State funds for the implementation of these 
plans and specifications; and further to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to enter any and all contracts for the 
implementation of those plans and specifications, and for 
the expenditure of all Federal and State funds available 
to the Town for said implementation. 

The Finance Committee did not recommend the arti- 
cle. The Board of Selectman did not recommend the arti- 
cle, at this time. Stating the project can wait a year. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. 



UNDER ARTICLE 20 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, the 
sum of five thousand two hundred dollars ($5,200.00) to 
pay for the Town of Chelmsford portion of the shared 
traffic engineer, as funded by E.O.C.D. multi- 
community grant. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 Finance Committee Chairman, 
Elizabeth Marshall moved to amend the article to read 
$10,000.00. Raymond McCusker of the Police Union, 
spoke against the article. He explained that this would be 
a wash out account. When companies hired police for 
special details, it takes up to three weeks before the men 
would be paid. With this special account the money 
comes out of the account and the men will be paid within 
the week that they work. The monies from the companies 
will be kept in the account for disbursement. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend, which left the chair in doubt, he then asked for a 
show of hands, motion defeated to amend. The 
Moderator then asked for a voice vote on the main mo- 
tion, motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Raymond McCusker moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $20,000. to be placed in a 
special fund as authorized under the provisions of 
Chapter 44, Section 53C of the General Laws. Said funds 
to be used, along with all other monies received by the 
Town as compensation earned by it's employees from off- 
duty work details, in such manner and at such times as 
shall, in the discretion of the authority authorizing such 
off-duty work detail, compensate the employee for such 



UNDER ARTICLE 24 Chairman of the Library 
Trustees, Susan Cantin moved that the Town vote to 
transfer and appropriate the sum of nine thousand thirty- 
eight dollars ($9,038.00) from the State Aid Funds, Addi- 
tional Aid to Public Libraries, to the Board of Library 
Trustees, for the purpose of the enrichment of the 
Reference collections at the libraries. 

Library Trustee, Mark Gauthier, spoke about the arti- 
cle. The Finance Committee did not recommend the arti- 
cle. The Board of Selectmen were not in favor of the arti- 
cle. A Discussion took place. Lorraine Lambert and 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Library Trustees spoke in favor of 
the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, which 
left the chair in doubt. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands, motion carried. 

The Moderator called to order at 9:25PM the Special 
Town Meeting. 



85 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 27, 1986 

The Moderator recognized the presence of a quorum. 
Larry Cunningham questioned the presence of a 
quorum. The Moderator asked the tellers to come for- 
ward and count the voters present. There were 203 voters 
present. Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. moved to ad- 
journ the Special Town Meeting. A voice vote was taken 
which left the chair in doubt, The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion defeated. A Discussion took place, 
John Carpenter moved to adjourn the meeting until June 
2nd, Selectman Emerson explained that the Board of 
Selectmen had scheduled three public hearings for then. 
Mr. Carpenter submitted his motion to read to adjourn 
the Special Town Meeting until Monday June 9th. The 
Selectmen were in favor of the motion. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion carried. Selectman Emer- 
son wanted to change the location of the meeting from 
the Gymnasium to the Auditorium. In order to do this 
the motion had to be reconsidered then a vote had to be 
taken on the location. Selectman Emerson moved to 
reconsider the motion to adjourn. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. Selectman 
Emerson explained that there was an expense involved to 
set up the Gymnasium, and asked for the meeting to be 
held in the Auditorium, at 7:30 PM at the McCarthy Jr. 
High on June 9th, 1986. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator reconvened the Adjourned Annual 
Town Meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 39 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to convey 
and transfer all right, title, and interest, if any, held by 
the Town in a certain parcel of land located at 283 
Riverneck Road and being the premises taken by the 
Town of Chelmsford by an instrument of taking, dated 
July 29, 1977 and recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 2260, Page 274, con- 
taining approximately 24,675 square feet of land, more 
or less. 

Nancy Burnham explained that the land abuts her 
land and she would like to be able to maintain it. The 
Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee sup- 
ported the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 40 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined to convey 
and transfer all right, title, and interests, if any, held by 
the Town, in a certain parcel of land on Wightman 
Street, shown as Lot 14, Blk 10 on Assessors' Plat 10 and 
being the premises taken by the Town of Chelmsford by 
an instrument of taking, dated May 3, 1979 and recorded 
in Middlesex North district Registry of Deeds in Book 



2364, Page 152, containing approximately 5,000 square 
feet, more or less, of land. 

The direct abutter to the land was not present to ex- 
plain the purpose of wanting the land. The Selectmen 
moved to dismiss the article, the Finance Committee sup- 
ported the Selectmen. The Moderator explained that if 
the Town Meeting Body voted to defeat the article then, 
they in fact are dismissing the article. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 41 Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee Elizabeth Marshall, moved that the Town vote to 
instruct the Board of Assessors to issue the sum of eight 
hundred fifty-two thousand dollars ($852,000.00) from 
Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax 
rate. 

The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee 
supported the article. A discussion took place. Howard 
Redfern, Executive Secretary to the Board of Selectmen 
explained the article. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator moved to adjourn the Annual Town 
Meeting sini die, seeing that there was no need for further 
business. Motion carried, unanimously. The Meeting ad- 
journed at 9:50 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

June 9, 1986 

The Adjourned Special Town Meeting was called to 
order at 8:00 PM at the McCarthy Jr. High Auditorium, 
by the Moderator Dennis McHugh. 

The Moderator read a motion by Selectman John P. 
Emerson Jr. to delete the article. Larry Cunningham 
questioned the presence of a quorum. The following 
tellers came forward and counted the voters present in 
the auditorium: 



Licia Stack 
Donald Elias 
Jean Horgan 
Jocelyn Anthony 
John Warren 



Gail Klemmer 
Margaret Johnson 
Normand LaBrecque 
Jane McKersie 



The result of the hand count 245 voters present. The 
quorum requirement to conduct a Special Town Meeting 
is 300. The Moderator moved to recess the meeting until 
8:30 PM and asked the Policemen to go outside to a soc- 
cer game, which was going on, and ask the people to 
come inside to attend the meeting. 



86 



The Moderator reconvened the meeting at 8:30 PM 
and asked the tellers to come forward and conduct a 
count of the voters present in the auditorium. There were 
283 voters present. The Moderator explained that due to 
the expenses involved with conducting Special Town 
Meetings, he declared the meeting disolved and adjourn- 
ed the meeting sine, die. The meeting adjourned at 8:35 
PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

SEPTEMBER 25, 1986 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School 
Auditorium on Thursday evening, the twenty-fifth day of 
September 1986, at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act upon 
the following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE I . To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer Commissioners 
to acquire any and all temporary and/or permanent 
easements, and any property in fee simple with the buildigs 
and trees thereon by purchase, eminent domain, or other- 
wise, for the property located in the Town of Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, and further described and shown on a set 
of plans, entitled Plan of Sewer Easement in Chelmsford, 
Massachusettss, Center Interceptor Sewer, prepared for the 
Chelmsford Sewer Commission, September, 1986, scale 1 
inch = 40 feet, by Howe Surveying, copies of which are on 
file in the office of the Town Engineer and are incorporated 
herewith, for the purpose of constructing and maintaiing 
gravity sewers, force mains, pumping station, and all other 
appurtenances thereto and to see if the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate, transfer and appropriate from avail- 
able funds, transfer and appropriate from the Stabiliza- 
tion fund, transfer and appropriate revenue sharing funds 
and/or borrow a certain sum of money to defray all neces- 
sary costs, fees and expenses in connection with the acquisi- 
tion of said land and for paying any damages which may 
be awarded as the result of any such taking; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
Sewer Commission 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 83, Sec- 
tion 16, Paragraphs A through F, inclusive regarding sewer 
user charge liens and the related powers and methods of 



collection of liens to be placed on property in the case of 
nonpayment of sewer user charges; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
Sewer Commission 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
system of Sewer Betterment Assessments and Sewer 
Privilege Fees, dated September, 1986, as prepared by 
Weston & Sampson Engineers, Inc., copies of which are 
on file with the office of the Board of Selectmen, and Town 
Clerk, and are incorporated herewith with assessments and 
fees to be based on the uniform unit method in accordance 
with and under the authority of Chapter 80 "Betterments" 
and Chapter 83 "Sewer, Drains and Sidewalks", Section 
14 through 24, inclusive, of the General Laws of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
Sewer Commission 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to petition the Great and General Court to 
enact amendments to Chapter 420 of the Acts of 1985 to 
authorize the Town to contract with the Chelmsford Center 
Industrial Sewer District for the use of proceeds of bonds 
or notes issued by the Town under the vote passed on May 
7, 1984 under Article 30, and to authorize the District to 
levy property taxes if necessary to pay debt service, to have 
outstanding indebtedness of up to $3,000,000 and to in- 
cur indebtedness not later than October 23, 1988;-or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to Petition the Great and General Court to 
enact an amendment to Chapter 420 of the Acts of 1985 
to authorize the Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer 
District to exercise all the powers and privileges of, and 
to be subject to limitations upon Towns regarding powers 
of Eminent Domain including but not limited to General 
Law Chapters 40, Chapter 79, and Chapter 82, for the 
purpose of powers authorized under said act, and any 
amendments thereto and to pay for any such takings with 
or from funds, raised or obtained under powers author- 
ized under said act, and any amendments thereto; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to petition the Great and General Court to 
enact an amendment to Chapter 420 of the Acts of 1985, 
to modify the boundaries of Chelmsford Center Industrial 
District as follows: 

By deleting the entire boundary description in Sec- 
tion 1 . of the Act and by substituting in its place the 
following boundary description: 



87 



Northwesterly along 3 to 495; thence Westerly from 
495 to River Meadow Brook; thence Southwesterly 
over various courses along River Meadow Brook, to 
Billerica Road, northwesterly along Billerica Road 
to Turnpike Road, then Southeasterly along Turn- 
pike Road to River Meadow Brook; thence continu- 
ing Southeasterly along Turnpike Road to Mill Road, 
including all abutting properties to the industrial 
sewer construction along Turnpike Road; thence 
Easterly along Mill Road, approximately one thou- 
sand five hundred feet (1,500') to the RB-IA zoning 
boundary line including all abutting properties to the 
industrial sewer construction along Mill Road; thence 
Southeasterly to the Billerica Town Line; thence 
Northeasterly along said Town Line to the point of 
beginning; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available 
funds, transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization 
Fund, transfer and appropriate revenue sharing funds, bor- 
row and/or petition the Great and General Court to enact 
legislation to allow the Town to borrow, by bond or note, 
a certain sum of money to engage engineers, contractors, 
attorneys, architects, and other necessary consultants 
and/or builders, for the purpose of preparing, designing 
and constructing a Senior Center and the preparation of 
all necessary documentation thereto, on the property under 
the control of the Board of Selectmen at the North School 
and being a portion of the property taken by the Town 
of Chelmsford by order of taking dated January 17, 1951 
and recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of 
deeds, Book 1161, Page 258, said contracts to be made 
under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to 
see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to negotiate and execute all necessary and proper con- 
tracts and agreements thereto; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
General Law Chapter 40 Section 57, authorizing the Town 
of Chelmsford to enact By-Laws and/or ordinances relative 
to the Grant or Renewal of Licenses as affected by non- 
payment of local taxes, and fees; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer/Tax Collector 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article VII — Miscellaneous, by adding 
Section 12. Grant or Renewal of all local licenses and/or 
permits. 

1. Definitions 

In this By-Law, the following terms have the follow- 
ing meaning: 



(a) License: shall mean any and all licenses or per- 
mits, issued by any Town of Chelmsford Board, 
division, officer, or department, and shall in- 
clude all renewals and transfers. 

(b) Licensing authority: any Town of Chelmsford 
Board, division, officer or department, with 
jurisdiction over the issuance of any license or 
permit. 

2. The Town of Chelmsford Board, division, officer or 
department, with jurisdiction over the issuance of any 
license, shall have the authority to deny any applica- 
tion for, or revoke or suspend any license within its 
jurisdiction, for any person, partnership, corporation, 
trust, business entity or enterprise who and/or which 
has neglected, refused, or failed to pay any local 
taxes, fees, assessments, betterments, or any other 
municipal charge. 

3. The tax collector or other municipal official respon- 
sible for records of all municipal taxes, assessments, 
betterments and other municipal charges, hereinafter 
referred to as the tax collector, shall annually fur- 
nish to each department, board, commission or divi- 
sion, hereinafter referred to as the licensing authority, 
that issues licenses or permits including renewals and 
transfers, a list of any person, partnership, corpora- 
tion, trust, business entity or enterprise, hereinafter 
referred to as the party, that has neglected or refus- 
ed to pay any local taxes, fees, assessments, better- 
ments or other municipal charges for not less than 
a twelve month period, and that such party has not 
filed in good faith a pending application for an 
abatement of such tax or a pending petition before 
the appellate tax board. 

4. The licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend 
any license or permit, including renewals and 
transfers of any party whose name appears on said 
list furnished to the licensing authority from the tax 
collector; provided, however, that written notice is 
given to the party and the tax collector, as required 
by applicable provisions of law, and the party is given 
a hearing, to be held not earlier than fourteen days 
after said notice. Said list shall be prima facie 
evidence for denial, revocation or suspension of said 
license or permit to any party. The tax collector shall 
have the right to intervene in any hearing conducted 
with respect to such license denial, revocation or 
suspension. Any findings made by the licensing 
authority with respect to such denial, revocation or 
suspension shall be made only for the purposes of 
such proceeding and shall not be relevant to or in- 
troduced in any other proceeding at law, except for 
any appeal from such license denial, revocation or 
suspension. Any license or permit denied, suspended 
or revoked under this section shall not be reissued 
or renewed until the license authority receives a cer- 
tificate issued by the tax collector that the party is 
in good standing with respect to any and all Ideal 
taxes, fees, assessments, betterments or other 



municipal charges, payable to the municipality as the 
date of issuance of said certificate. 

5. Any party shall be given an opportunity to enter in- 
to a payment agreement, thereby allowing the licen- 
sing authority to issue a certificate indicating said 
limitations to the license or permit and the validity 
of said license shall be conditioned upon the satisfac- 
tory compliance with said agreement. Failure to com- 
ply with said agreement shall be grounds for the 
suspension or renovation of said license or permit; 
provided, however, that the holder be given notice 
and a hearing as required by applicable provisions 
of law. 

6. The Board of Selectmen may waive such denial, 
suspension or revocation if it finds there is no direct 
or indirect business interest by the property owner, 
its officers or stockholders, if any, or members of his 
immediate family, as defined in section one of chapter 
two hundred and sixty-eight in the business or ac- 
tivity conducted in or on said property. 

7. This by-law shall not apply to the following licenses 
and permits: open burning; section thirteen of 
chapter forty-eight; bicycle permits; section eleven 
A of chapter eight-five; sales of articles for charit- 
able purposes, section thirty- three of chapter one 
hundred and one; children work permits, section 
sixty-nine of chapter one hundred and forty-nine; 
clubs, associations dispensing food or beverage 
licenses, section twenty-one E of chapter one hun- 
dred and forty; dog licenses, section one hundred and 
thirty-seven of chapter one hundred and forty; 
fishing, hunting, trapping license, section twelve of 
chapter one hundred and thirty-one; marriage 
licenses, section twenty-eight of chapter two hundred 
and seven and theatrical events, public exhibition 
permits, section one hundred and eighty-one of 
chapter one hundred and forty; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Town Treasurer/Tax Collector 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the board of Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary 
and/or permanent easements, and any property in fee sim- 
ple, by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, on the 
following parcels of property described as: 



A. 



Parcel Numbers 1, la, and 2 on a certain plan on 
file with the Town Engineer and incorporated 
herewith entitled "Easement Plan of Land in 
Chelmsford, MA prepared for the Town of 
Chelmsford, Scale 1"40', by Vanasse/Hangen 
Engineering, Inc., Consulting Engineers and Plan- 
ners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, Boston, Massachu- 
setts dated October 29, 1984 sheet 2 of 6." 



B. 



Parcel Number 9 on a certain plan on file with the 
Town Engineer and incorporated herewith entitled 
"Easements Plan of Land in Chelmsford, MA 
prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1"40', 
by Vanasse/Hangen Engineering, Inc., Consulting 
Engineers and Planners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, 
Boston, Massachusetts dated October 29, 1984, sheet 
4 of 6." 



Parcel Numbers 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 on a certain plan 
on file with the Town Engineer entitled "Easement 
Plan of Land in Chelmsford, MA prepared for the 
Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1"40', by Vanasse/Hangen 
Engineering, Inc., Consulting Engineers and Plan- 
ners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, Boston, Massachu- 
setts dated October 29, 1984, sheet 5 of 6." 



D. 



Parcel Number 10 on a certain plan on file with the 
Town Engineer and incorporated herewith entitled 
"Easement Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Ma prepared 
for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1"40' by 
Vanasse/Hangen Engineering, Inc., Consulting 
Engineers and Planners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, 
Boston, Massachusetts, dated October 29, 1984, sheet 
6 of 6." 

for the purpose of construction, improvements, 
widening, laying out and accepting said portion of 
Billerica Road and to see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate, transfer and appropriate from 
available funds, transfer and appropriate from the 
Stabilization fund, transfer and appropriate revenue 
sharing funds and/or borrow a certain sum of money 
to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in con- 
nection with the acquisition of said land and for pay- 
ing any damages which may be awarded as the result 
of any such takings; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer and appropriate from available 
funds a certain sum of money with which to meet bills of 
previous years; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple, by pur- 
chase, by eminent domain or otherwise, the property with 
the buildings and trees thereon beginning at the most 
northwesterly corner of the parcel at the intersection of the 
lot line and the Lowell-Chelmsford boundary line, running 
along said lot line south 13° 46' 36" west two hundred eight 
and 35/100 (208.35') feet: 



89 



Thence south 88° 55' 09" east one hundred fifty and 
63/100 (150.63') feet; 

Thence south 02° 58' 00" west seven hundred seven- 
teen and 78/100 (717.78') feet; 

Thence south 89° 14' 00" west twenty and 44/100 
(20.04') feet; 

Thence south 36° 27' 11" east six hundred thirty-one 
and 55/100 (631.55') feet; 

Thence south 21° 01' 25" east eighty-nine and 22/100 
(89.22') feet; 

Thence easterly along the boundary of U.S. Route 
3 on a curved line having a radius of 4,750 feet and 
a length of 1,198.44 feet thence north 84° 04' 50" east 
122.82 feet to the intersection with the westerly boun- 
dary of Steadman Street; 

Thence north along the westerly boundary of Stead- 
man Street on a curved line having a radius of 371.70 
feet and a length of 132.41 feet thence north 06° 49' 
50" west a distance of 490.88 feet to a point thence 
still along said road north 10° 37' 52" west 37.26 feet 
to the Lowell-Chelmsford boundary; 

Thence north 62° 10' 58" west one thousand eight 
hundred eighty-one and 77/100 (1,881.77) feet to the 
point of beginning, containing approximately 38.00 
acres, and further shown as a Parcel of land on a cer- 
tain plan on file with the Town Clerk and the Town 
Engineer, entitled Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass- 
achusetts, Scale 1"=40', February 22, 1986, by Howe 
Surveying Associates, for the purpose of creation of 
an ash depository, and to see if the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate, transfer and appropriate 
from available funds, transfer and appropriate from 
the Stabilization Fund, transfer and appropriate from 
revenue sharing funds, and/or borrow a certain sum 
of money to defray all necessary costs, fees and ex- 
penses in connection with the acquisition of said land 
and for paying any damages which may be awarded 
as the result of any such taking; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple, by pur- 
chase, by eminent domain or otherwise, the property with 
the buildings and trees thereon beginning at the most 
northwesterly corner of the parcel at the intersection of the 
lot line and the Lowell-Chelmsford boundary line, running 
along said lot line south 13° 46' 36" west two hundred eight 
and 35/100 (208.35') feet: 

Thence south 88° 55' 09" east one hundred fifty and 
63/100 (150.63') feet; 

Thence south 02° 58' 00" west seven hundred seven- 
teen and 78/100 (717.78') feet; 



Thence south 89° 14' 00" west twenty and 04/100 
(20.04') feet; 

Thence south 36° 27' 11" east six hundred thirty-one 
and 55/100 (631.55') feet; 

Thence south 21° 01' 25" east eighty-nine and 22/100 
(89.22) feet; 

Thence easterly along the boundary of U.S. Route 
3 on a curved line having a radius of 4,750 feet and 
a length of 1,198.44 feet thence north 84° 04' 50" east 
122.82 feet to the intersection with the westerly boun- 
dary of Steadman Street; 

Thence north along the westerly boundary of Stead- 
man Street on a curved line having a radius of 371.70 
feet and a length of 132.41 feet thence north 06° 49' 
50" west a distance of 490.88 feet to a point thence 
still along said road north 10° 37' 52" west 37.26 feet 
to the Lowell-Chelmsford boundary; 

Thence north 62° 10' 58" west one thousand eight 
hundred eighty-one and 77/100 (1,881.77) feet to the 
point of beginning, containing approximately 38.00 
acres, and further shown as a Parcel of land on a cer- 
tain plan on file with the Town Clerk and the Town 
Engineer, entitled Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass- 
achusetts, Scale 1"=40', February 22, 1986, by Howe 
Surveying Associates, for the purpose of open space 
land, and/or active and passive recreation areas, and 
to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, 
transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization Fund, 
transfer and appropriate from revenue sharing funds, 
and/or borrow a certain sum of money to defray all 
necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with 
the acquisition of said land and for paying any dam- 
ages which may be awarded as the result of any such 
taking; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, appraisers, 
attorneys and other necessary consultants for the purpose 
of development and establishment of a Resource Recovery 
Facility and to determine any effects of said facility on the 
Town of Chelmsford and to execute all necessary and pro- 
per contracts and agreements, and further to see if the 
Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from avail- 
able funds or amend Article 38 of the Annual Town 
Meeting of 1985 to remove the conditions regarding the 
payment of funds, and appropriate and transfer therefrom, 
a certain sum of money to defray all necessary costs, fees 
and expenses, with all said contracts to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, appraisers, 



90 



attorneys, architects, and other necessary consultants for 
the purpose of preparing and designing all documents re- 
quired to design and construct repairs to the Center Fire 
Station for the Town of Chelmsford, and further to see if 
the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
negotiate and execute all necessary and proper contracts 
and agreements thereto, and further to see if the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate, transfer and appropriate 
from available funds, or borrow a certain sum of money 
to defray all necessary costs, fees, and expenses; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or appropriate and transfer from available 
funds the sum of forty-six thousand two hundred and six- 
ty dollars ($46,260.00) to Line Item 65. Nashoba Valley 
Regional High School Assessments; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple by pur- 
chase, eminent domain, or otherwise, the property located 
on Fletcher Street, in the Town of Chelmsford, and fur- 
ther described as Parcel 1 and Parcel 2 on a certain plan 
filed with the Town Engineer entitled, "Plan Showing Tak- 
ings for Widening of Fletcher Street, Chelmsford, Massa- 
chusetts", prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 
1"=20', September 8, 1986 by Harry R. Feldman, Inc. Land 
Surveyors, 112 Shawmut Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts for 
the purpose of constructing improvements and widening 
Fletcher Street as part of the Chelmsford Street/Fletcher 
Street intersection improvements; and to see if the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, transfer and appropriate from Article 21 of the An- 
nual Town Meeting of 1985 or borrow a certain sum of 
money to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in 
connection with the acquisition of said land and for pay- 
ing any damages which may be awarded as a result of any 
such taking; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to rescind 
the acceptance of the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 48, Section 42, or corresponding provisions 
of earlier laws, as accepted at the Annual Town Meeting 
in 1954 establishing a fire department to be under the con- 
trol of officer to be known as the chief of the department, 
and to see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 48, Section 42 A, 
establishing a fire department under the direction of the 
Selectmen; or act in relation thereto. 



Requirements and restrictions applicable 
to mobilehome parks 

As stated in this chapter, licensee meaning Chelmsford 
Mobile Park Inc. would have to file and appear before a 
(Governmental board commission or body) to request a per- 
mit for change of use or discontinuance of Mobile Park. 

Prior correspondence forwarded to Chelmsford Mobile 
Park Inc. , as to if there had been any filing as to a change 
of use or discontinuance of Mobile Park and if so, as to 
what Governmental commission board or Body filing tran- 
sacted? As of date no reply. 

Mass. General Laws Chapter 140 Section 32C, 32F 

This section and preceding sections which designate 
Board of Health as (licensing body), for mobile home park 
and which authorized Board of Health to adopt rules and 
regulations to aid the enforcement of licensing provisions 
does not preempt the field of trailer park regulations but 
rather leaves to the town substantial authority to impose 
further restrictions of the operation of trailer parks. 

The rule making power of the Board of Health with 
respect to the licensing of mobile home parks is not 
restricted to the adoption of rules relating to public health. 

AMENDMENT 

That the Board of Selectmen Town of Chelmsford, thru 
cooperation of Chelmsford Town Counsel James Harrington 
and in accordance with Mass. General Law Chapter 140 
Section 32C, 32F, Designate the Board of Health Town of 
Chelmsford as Governing Body and any actions in behalf 
of the Chelmsford Mobile Park Inc. as to Discontinuance 
or change of Chelmsford Mobile Park would have to be 
filed and heard by the Board of Health, Chelmsford, Mass- 
achusetts. 

That the Board of Health Town of Chelmsford require 
that the Chelmsford Mobile Park Inc. (Owners) get a per- 
mit for such a discontinuance or use or change. That the 
Chelmsford Mobile Park Inc. (Owners) must give at least 
15 days written notice that they will be appearing before 
the proper authorities to request such a permit. This notice 
requirement is to give you the chance to oppose the gran- 
ting of the permit; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 8th day of September, A.D. 
1986. 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote that 
Reference: Mass. General Law Chapter 140 Section 32L 
Paragraph (8) 



John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 



91 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



SEPTEMBER 10, 1986 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Town Offices Building Gymnasium; Harrington 
School Gymnasium; Harrington School Gymnasium; 
Westlands School Gymnasium; Byam School Cafetorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; Harrington School Gym- 
nasium; McCarthy Junior High School Cafeteria; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; McCarthy Junior High School 
Cafeteria; fourteen days at least before the time appointed 
for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

September 25, 1986 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:55 
PM by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, at the McCarthy 
Jr. High School Auditorium. The Moderator recognized the 
presence of a quorum, there were 469 voters present. 

Selectman Emerson moved that the reading of the Con- 
stable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman Emerson 
moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waived. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator gave a brief explanation of the Town 
Meeting procedures. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Chairman of the Sewer Commis- 
sion, John Emerson, explained the article. He then asked 
for permission from the Moderator, for a representative 
from Weston and Sampson (the firm hired by the Sewer 
Commission) to speak if further explanation is needed, on 
this article and the next two. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. Francis 
Yanuskiewicz, of Weston and Sampson, came forward and 
introduced himself as the firm's engineer. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Select- 
men recommended the article. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on the article, motion carried, unanimously. 
The article reads as follows: Chairman of the Sewer Com- 
mission, John Emerson moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer Com- 
missioners to acquire any and all temporary and/or per- 
manent easements, and any property in fee simple with 
the buildings and trees thereon by purchase, eminent do- 
main, or otherwise, for the property located in the Town 
of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further described and 



shown on a set of plans, entitled Plan of Sewer Easement 
in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Center Interceptor Sewer, 
prepared for the Chelmsford Sewer Commission, 
September, 1986, scale 1 inch = 40 feet, by Howe Survey- 
ing, copies of which are on file in the office of the Town 
Engineer and are incorprated herewith, for the purpose 
of constructing and maintaining gravity sewers, force 
mains, pumping station, and all other appurtenances 
thereto with said funds required to defray all necessary 
costs, fees, and expenses in connection with the acquisi- 
tion of said land and for paying any damages which may 
be awarded as the result of any such taking to be expend- 
ed from the Sale of Bonds and/or notes authorized from 
Article 31 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1984. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Chairman of the Sewer Commis- 
sion, John Emerson, moved that the town vote to accept 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 83, 
Section 16, Paragraphs A through F, inclusive regarding 
sewer user charge liens and the related powers and methods 
of collection of liens to be placed on property in the case 
of nonpayment of sewer user charges. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 The Moderator explained the 
motion. The Finance Committee recommended the arti- 
cle. Francis Yanuskiewicz of Weston and Sampson answered 
questions from the Town Meeting Body. One of the con- 
cerns was if someone lived on a corner lot would they be 
charged twice the amount for running the lines from the 
house to the street? No they would not, one rate was going 
to be charged regardless if the house is located on a corner 
lot or not. More discussion took place. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. The 
article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John Emerson, 
moved that the town vote to adopt the system of Sewer Bet- 
terment Assessments and Sewer Privilege Fees, dated 
September 8, 1986, as prepared by Weston and Sampson 
Engineers, Inc., copies of which are on file with the office 
of the Board of Selectmen, and Town Clerk, and are in- 
corporated herewith and appear as follows: 

BETTERMENT ASSESSMENTS AND 

SEWER PRIVILEGE FEES 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MA 

SEPTEMBER 8, 1986 

Section 1. General 

The Town of Chelmsford, acting through its Sewer Com- 
mission, shall assess the owners of land abutting a public 
sewer line installed by the Town by a rate based upon the 
uniform unit method. Sewer assessments shall be deter- 
mined utilizing sewer unit values and shall be levied as bet- 
terment assessments or sewer privilege fees as described 
herein. 



92 



The Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer District as 
described herein shall be empowered to levy assessments 
against properties within its jurisdiction. Assessments 
charged against residential properties within the District 
shall be equivalent to the assessments charged by the Town 
of Chelmsford Sewer Commission against those residential 
properties within the Town but outside the jurisdiction of 
the District. 



dex. The time of assessment for lands abutting the sewer 
line shall be that date upon which the sewer system with 
appurtenances is "approved for use." In the case where the 
construction of that portion of the sewer system (lateral 
sewers) partially funded by betterments is completed prior 
to the date upon which the sewer system is "approved for 
use" it shall be within the powers of the Sewer Commission 
to establish an earlier date of assessment. 



The authority to assess betterments, as well as the per- 
mitted methodologies for doing so, are described in 
Chapter 80 "Betterments" and Chapter 83 "Sewers", Drains, 
and Sidewalks", Sections 14 and 24 of the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

If any provision of these regulations or the application 
thereof to any person or circumstances is held invalid, such 
invalidity shall not affect other provisions or applications 
of these regulations which can be given effect without such 
invalid provisions or applications. 

Section 2. Method of Assessing Betterments 

2.1 General 

The Town of Chelmsford shall assess sewer betterments 
based upon the uniform unit method. Sewer users shall be 
assessed by a rate proportional to the value assigned to the 
sewer unit at the time of assessment. Said rate shall be 
determined by user class and shall apply to all lands 
developed or underdeveloped abutting the aforemention- 
ed public sewer line. The total assessments shall not ex- 
ceed the local share of the total sewer project cost which 
shall include total costs of engineering survey and design, 
construction, land acquisition, construction engineering 
services and all related contingencies less all state and 
federal aid received. 

The Commission shall levy assessments against all pro- 
perties abutting a sewered street within six months after 
completion of the pertinent construction contract. In the 
Order of Assessment they shall designate the owner of each 
parcel as of the preceding January 1st as liable to assess- 
ment as stipulated under the provisions of the General 
Laws. 

2.2 Time of Assessment 

2.2.1. Betterments 

The basis for determining the sewer unit value shall be 
in accordance with Article 31 of the Adjourned Session of 
the Annual Town Meeting of May 7th, 1984, and any Sewer 
Commission actions taken relative thereto. In accordance 
with a motion made during the February 16, 1984 meeting 
of the Chelmsford Sewer Commission, the equivalent 
monetary value of one sewer unit shall be set at one thou- 
sand dollars ($1000.00). Construction cost increases and 
the related inflationary effects upon the aforementioned 
local share of said construction costs shall be reflected 
within the sewer unit value at the time of assessment bas- 
ed upon the Boston Engineering News Record (ENR) In- 



2.2.2 Sewer Privilege Fees 

For those properties not abutting the sewer line but tie- 
ing into the system at a future date, the time of assessment 
shall be the date upon which that property connects into 
the sewer system. 

2.3 Sewer Unit Value Determination 

The sewer unit value shall be determined as follows: 



One Sewer Unit ($) = $1000.00 X 



ENR— Boston Index (1) 
4290 (2) 



1. ENR— Boston Index at the time of assessment as des- 
cribed in Section 2.2 

2. ENR— Boston Index for May 1984 (Date of Annual 
Town Meeting wherein local monies were ap- 
propriated for design and construction of the North 
Chelmsford and Chelmsford Center Sewer Project). 

Section 3. Sewer Unit Designation 

3.1 General 

Sewer units shall be designated based upon the user class 
of those properties to be assessed a betterment. Said classes 
shall include residential and non-residential. The non- 
residential class shall include commercial, industrial, 
municipal and any or all other non-residential properties. 
Special provisions are made herein for those properties 
located within the Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer 
District. 

Properties receiving direct benefit from the public sewer 
system, whether developed or undeveloped shall be 
designated a number of sewer units in accordance with pro- 
cedures adopted during the Chelmsford Sewer Commis- 
sion meeting held on July 9, 1986. 

3.2 Sewer Unit Determinations 
3.2.1 Residential, Developed 

3.2.1.1 Single family dwellings shall comprise one 
sewer unit. 

3.2.1.2 Duplex dwellings shall comprise two sewer 
units. 

3.2.1.3 Three-family dwellings shall comprise three 
sewer units. 



93 



3.2.1.4 Four-family dwellings shall comprise four 
sewer units. 

3.2.1.5 Multiple family dwellings (in excess of four 
dwelling units) shall comprise a number of 
sewer units based on the following 
methodology: 

3.2.1.5.1 Rental properties (apartments) 
shall be assessed one sewer unit for 
each apartment with more than 
one bedroom. Rental properties 
shall be assessed one half of one 
sewer unit for each one bedroom or 
studio apartment. 

3.2.1.5.2 Condominium complex shall be 
assessed one sewer unit for each 
dwelling unit. 

3.2.2 Non-Residential, Developed 

3.2.2.1 Non-residential buildings shall include all in- 
dustrial, commercial and municipal pro- 
perties. 

3.2.2.2 Non-residential buildings which are metered 
for water use shall comprise a number of sewer 
units based upon water consumption using 
the following formula: 

Non-residential water usage 

in gallons per day (gpd) = equivalent number 
300 gpd of sewer units 

(All decimals shall be rounded up to the nearest whole 
number.) 

3.2.2.3 Non-residential buildings not metered for 
water use shall be assigned a water consump- 
tion volume based on Title 5 (Part 2, Section 
13) of the State Environmental Code for the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Minimum 
Requirements for the Subsurface Disposal of 
Sanitary Sewage. An equivalent number of 
sewer units shall then be determined by us- 
ing the following formula: 



Non-residential sewage 
in gallons per day (gpd) 
240 gpd 



= equivalent number 
of sewer units 



(All decimals shall be rounded up to the nearest whole 
number.) 

3.2.3 Residential, Undeveloped 

3.2.3.1 Undeveloped lots shall be converted into 
dwelling units on the basis of maximum 
number of buildable dwelling lots using the 
applicable minimum frontage and area re- 
quirements as directed in the Zoning By-Laws 



in effect at the time of assessment. Each 
potential dwelling unit shall then comprise 
one sewer unit. 

3.2.4 Non-Residential, Undeveloped 

3.2.4.1 Undeveloped lots shall be converted into a 
maximum anticipated water consumption on 
the basis of the Zoning By-Laws. An 
equivalent number of sewer units shall then 
be determined utilizing the formula described 
for non-residential, developed properties in 
Section 3.2.2.2 of this section. 

Section 4. Betterment Payment 

4.1. General 

Except as herein provided, the provisions of the General 
Laws relative to the assessment, apportionment, division, 
re-assessment, abatement, and collection of sewer 
assessments, to liens therefor, and to interest thereon shall 
apply to assessments made under this by-law, and the Tax 
Assessor of the Town shall have all of the powers conveyed 
by the General Laws. 

4.2 Lump Sum Betterment 

The lump sum betterment payment for an assessed pro- 
perty shall be equivalent to the product of the total number 
of sewer units designated upon said property and the ap- 
propriate value for one sewer unit at the time of assessment. 
Said values shall be determined as described herein. 

4.3 Apportionment of Betterment Payment 

Property owners shall have the option to finance better- 
ment payments through apportionment. The interest rate 
charged by the Town shall be 2 percent greater than the 
project bond rate being paid by the Town for the sewer 
construction project. 

4.4 Betterment Deferral 

The provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
80, Section 13B, with regard to deferral of betterment 
assessments were adopted by the Town under Article 31 at 
the May 7, 1984 Adjourned Session of the Annual Town 
Meeting. 

Section 5. Sewer Privilege Fee 

5.1 Private Sewer Extension 

If a private developer or a person other than the Town 
of Chelmsford or duly authorized representative of same 
constructs a sewer extension to the public sewer system, the 
Town shall assess a sewer privilege fee in lieu of betterment 
assessment against each property tieing into said sewer ex- 
tension. The sewer privilege fee shall be equivalent to six- 
ty percent of the calculated betterment assessment value 
pertinent to each property as determined following pro- 



94 



cedures outlined in Section 3 of these regulations. Sewer 
privilege fees shall be levied at the time of connection to 
the public sewer system. Property owner options for pay- 
ment of said fees shall reflect those related to payment of 
betterment assessments as described in Sections 4.2 and 
4.3 of these regulations. 

In addition, property owners connecting to a private 
sewer extensions shall bear the burden of all costs related 
to the following: 

— Review of design plans and specifications for the 
private sewer extensions to be accepted as part of the 
municipal sewer system conducted by a Registered 
Professional Engineer as authorized by the 
Chelmsford Sewer Commission. 

— Inspection fees related to the installation of the 
private sewer line tieing into the public sewer system. 

— Application fees for a Building Sewer Installation 
Permit, which shall include costs related to installa- 
tion inspection performed by an inspector for the 
Town of Chelmsford. Said fees are described within 
the Town of Chelmsford Sewer Use Regulations, Ar- 
ticle IV, Section 2 as adopted by the Town of Chelms- 
ford Sewer Commission on September 23, 1986. 

Costs associated with the design and construction of a 
private sewer extension shall be considered separate to the 
sewer privilege fee. Payments or method of payment related 
to these costs shall not be reflected within the sewer privilege 
fee. 

5.2 Public Sewers on Unaccepted Ways 

If a property abuts a private or unaccepted way within 
which a public sewer has been installed or if a property 
lies within one hundred (100) feet of a public sewer within 
a private or unaccepted way, the Town shall assess a sewer 
privilege fee in lieu of betterment assessment against said 
property. The sewer privilege fee shall be equivalent to the 
betterment assessment value pertinent to said property as 
determined following procedures outlined in Section 3 of 
these regulations and shall be levied at the time of con- 
nection to the public sewer. All rules and regulations gover- 
ning the payment and method of payment related to 
betterment assessments as described in Sections 4.2 and 

4.3 of these regulations shall apply. 

5.3 Compensatory Sewer Privilege Fee 

In the situation where a betterment has been assessed 
to an undeveloped property based upon the estimated 
number of developable dwelling units as required by these 
regulations and said property is ultimately developed to 
accommodate a number of dwelling units in excess of the 
number estimated for determining the betterment, assess- 
ment, the Town shall assess a compensatory sewer privilege 
fee. This fee shall be equivalent to that sum of money that 
would have been charged as a betterment assessment upon 
the additional dwelling units at the time of the original 



assessment. All rules and regulations governing the pay- 
ment and method of payment related to betterment 
assessments as designated in Sections 4.2 and 4.3 of these 
regulations shall apply. 

Section 6. Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer District 

6.1 General 

In accordance with the Legislative Act of the Great and 
General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
establishing the Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer 
District (herein after referred to as the District) enacted 
on the 23rd of October, 1985, all properties located within 
the District and tieing into a District sewer system shall be 
exempt from betterment assessments and sewer privilege 
fees as described in Sections 1 through 5 of these regula- 
tions. This exemption applies only to betterments assessed 
by the Town of Chelmsford through its Sewer Commission 
and does not apply to betterments or sewer assessments the 
District is empowered to assess through the provisions of 
the aforementioned Act and modifications thereto. 

6.2 Dissolution of District 

Upon termination or dissolution of the District, the Town 
of Chelmsford Sewer Commission shall be authorized to 
assess privilege fees against properties tieing into sewers 
formerly under District authority. Said assessments shall 
be levied and collected by the Town of Chelmsford Sewer 
Commission in accordance with the provisions of these 
regulations and the revenue may be utilized to retire any 
debt left by the District or to defray any sewer costs related 
thereto 

Assessments and fees being based upon the uniform unit 
method in said above accordance with and under the 
authority of Chapter 80 "Betterments" and Chapter 83 
"Sewer, Drains and Sidewalks", Section 14 through 24, in- 
clusive, of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 



UNDER ARTICLE 4 Town Counsel, James Harr- 
ington, explained the legal purpose of the article. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. A discus- 
sion took place. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on 
the article, motion carried, unanimously. The article reads 
as follows: 

Selectman John Emerson, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Selectmen to petition the General Court to 
enact Amendments to Chapter 420 of the Acts of 1985 
substantially in the following form or in such other form 
as the General Court may deem appropriate for the pur- 
poses specified in this Article: 



95 



AN ACT RELATING TO THE CHELMSFORD CENTER 

INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT AND THE 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

SECTION 1. Section 5 of Chapter 420 of the acts of 1985 
is hereby amended by striking out the third paragraph and 
inserting in place thereof the following paragraph: — 

The fees, rates, rents, assessments, abatements and 
other charges established by the board shall not be 
subject to supervision or regulation by any depart- 
ment, division, commission, board, bureau, or agen- 
cy of the Commonwealth or any of its political 
subdivisions, including, without limitation, the town, 
nor shall the district be subject to the provisions of 
Section twenty A of chapter fifty-nine of the General 
Laws. Notwithstanding the foregoing, except to the 
extent of betterments assessed by the board and ex- 
cept as provided in section eight, the board shall have 
no power of taxation. Except for payment of prin- 
cipal of and interest on bonds or notes of the district, 
the board's operating budget shall be limited to the 
sum of five thousand dollars for current ad- 
ministrative expenses approved by the board in the 
year nineteen hundred and eighty-five. Each year 
thereafter said sum may be increased two and one- 
half per cent per year. 

SECTION 2. Section 6 of said chapter 420 is hereby 
amended by striking out in line three the words "two 
million" and inserting in place thereof the words: —three 
million. 

SECTION 3. Section 8 of said chapter 420 is hereby 
amended by adding the following two paragraphs: — 

To the extent that moneys therefor are not otherwise 
provided, a sum sufficient to pay the principal and 
interest coming due within the year on the district's 
general obligation bonds or notes issued hereunder 
shall be appropriated and, even if it is not ap- 
propriated, shall be raised by taxation. In order to 
provide such sum in each year and notwithstanding 
any other provisions herein to the contrary, all tax- 
able property in the district shall be subject to ad 
valorem taxation by the district without limitation 
as to rate or amount. 

The assessors of the Town shall assess taxes levied 
under this act on property within the district in the 
same manner in all respects in which town taxes are 
required by law to be assessed; provided, that no 
estate shall be subject to any tax assessed on account 
of the system of sewerage under this act if, in the judg- 
ment of the board, after a hearing due notice whereof 
shall have been given, such estate is so situated that 
the buildings thereon, or the buildings that might 
be constructed thereon, could not be connected with 
said system in any ordinary or reasonable manner; 
but all other estates in the district shall be deemed 



to be benefited and shall be subject to such tax. A 
certified list of the estates exempt from taxation 
under the provisions of this section shall be sent by 
said board to said assessors. The assessment shall be 
committed to the Town Collector, who shall collect 
said tax in the manner provided by law for the col- 
lection of town taxes, and shall deposit the proceeds 
thereof with the district treasurer for the use and 
benefit of the district. The district may collect in- 
terest on overdue taxes in the manner in which in- 
terest is authorized to be collected on town taxes. 

SECTION 4. Section 10 of said chapter 420 is hereby 
amended by striking out the fifth, sixth and seventh 
sentences and inserting in place thereof the following 
sentences: —The outstanding debt of the district shall not 
exceed, in the aggregate at any one time, three million 
dollars, excluding temporary notes in anticipation of 
revenue or federal, state, local or other grants or aid. Each 
authorized issue shall constitute a separate loan and such 
loans shall be payable in not more than twenty years from 
their dates. Any indebtedness issued under this act with 
the exception of renewal notes issued pursuant to section 
six or refunding bonds issued pursuant to section nine shall 
be issued within three years of the effective date of this act. 

SECTION 5. Said chapter 420 is hereby further amend- 
ed by adding the following section: — 

SECTION 10A. The treasurer of the Town of Chelms- 
ford, with the approval of the Selectmen, may finance the 
construction of sewers or sewerage systems within the district 
by applying the proceeds of any bonds or notes issued or 
to be issued under the vote passed by the town under arti- 
cle thirty of the warrant for the Annual Town Meeting of 
nineteen hundred and eighty-four. Such proceeds may be 
applied for said purposes only in accordance with a con- 
tract between the town and the district, authorized and 
executed by the Selectmen of the town and the district 
Sewer Commissioners, that provides for payments by the 
district to the town to pay the district's share of the prin- 
cipal of and interest on the bonds or notes and related is- 
suance costs incurred by the town. 

Such bonds or notes of the town shall not be subject to 
the provisions of this act relating to bonds or notes of the 
district issued hereunder. Such bonds or notes shall remain 
general obligations of the town and shall be subject to the 
provisions of chapter forty-four of the General Laws, and 
the validity of the town's bonds or notes shall not depend 
upon the validity or enforceability of any contract between 
the town and the district. 

SECTION 6. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman John Emerson, moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to petition 
the General Court to enact amendments to Chapter 420 
of the Acts of 1985 substantially in the following form or 
in such other form as the General Court may deem ap- 
propriate for the purposes specified in this Article: 



96 



An Act relating to the Chelmsford Center Industrial 
District and the Town of Chelmsford. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section 4 (k) of Chapter 420 of the acts of 1985 
is hereby amended by inserting the following paragraph 
after Line 13 of Section 4 (k) to exercise all the powers and 
privileges of, and to be subject to limitations upon, Town, 
regarding, powers of Eminent Domain, including but not 
limited to General Law Chapter 40, Chapter 79, and 
Chapter 82 , for the purpose of powers authorized under 
said act, and any amendments thereto, and to pay for any 
such takings with or from funds, raised or obtained under 
said act, and any amendments thereto, provided, however, 
that any requirements in said Sections or Chapters for a 
vote by the Board of Selectmen or other governing body 
of a town or a vote by the voters of a town shall be satisfied 
by a vote or resolution duly adopted by the Board in ac- 
cordance herewith. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. A 
number of questions were asked by the Town Meeting Body. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Sewer Commissioner, John Emer- 
son, explained that this district is paying for its own in- 
stallation of lines etc. By allowing this district the Town 
is not responsible for any payments, and asked the Body 
to allow the district to be expanded. The Finance Com- 
mittee recommended the article. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. The article 
reads as follows: 

Selectman John Emerson, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Selectmen to petition the General Court to 
enact Amendments to Chapter 420 of the Acts of 1985 
substantially in the following form or in such other forms 
as the General Court may deem appropriate for the pur- 
poses specified in this Article: 

An Act relating to the Chelmsford Center Industrial 
District and the Town of Chelmsford. 

Be it enacted, etc. as follows: 

SECTION 1. Section 1 of Chapter 420 of the Acts of 1985 
is hereby amended by striking the entire Section 1. and in- 
serting the following in its place. 

SECTION 1. The following described area, together 
with all those inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
within said territory shall constitute a Sewer District 
and is hereby made a body corporate entitled the 
Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer District 
(hereinafter referred to as the District). 

Said Districts territory and area are bounded and 
described as follows: 



Northwesterly along 3 to 495; thence Westerly from 
495 to River Meadow Brook; thence Southwesterly 
over various courses along River Meadow Brook, to 
Billerica Road, northwesterly along Billerica Road 
to Turnpike Road, then Southeasterly along Turnpike 
Road to River Meadow Brook; thence continuing 
Southeasterly along Turnpike Road to Mill Road, in- 
cluding all abutting properties to the industrial sewer 
construction along Turnpike Road; thence Easterly 
along Mill Road, approximately one thousand five 
hundred feet (1,500') to the RB-IA zoning boundary 
line including all abutting properties to the industrial 
sewer construction along Mill Road; thence South- 
easterly to the Billerica Town Line; thence North- 
easterly along said Town Line to the point of 
beginning; 

Said territory and area is more particularly describ- 
ed on a plan entitled "Proposed Amended Plan for 
the Chelmsford Industrial Sewer District Scale 
1"=1000', September, 1986", prepared by Weston and 
Sampson Engineering, Inc. 

SECTION 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman John Emerson, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to dismiss this article. The Finance 
Committee recommended dismissal. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Town Treasurer, James 
Doukszewicz, moved that the Town vote to accept General 
Law Chapter 40 Section 57, authorizing the Town of 
Chelmsford to enact By-Laws and/or ordinances relative 
to the Grant or Renewal of Licenses as affected by non- 
payment of local taxes and fees. 

Town Treasurer, James Doukszewicz, explained the pur- 
pose of the article. A discussion took place, James 
Doukszewicz answered questions. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Town Treasurer, James 
Doukszewicz, explained that this is the by-law that would 
enforce the action voted on under article eight. The 
Moderator asked for any more discussion, hearing none, 
he asked for a voice vote, motion carried. The article reads 
as follows: 

Town Treasurer, James Doukszewicz, moved that the 
Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Article VII — 
Miscellaneous, by adding Section 12. Grant or Renewal 
of all local license and/or permits. 

Section 12. Grant or Renewal of all local license and/or 
permits. 

1. Definitions 

In this By-Law, the following terms have the follow- 
ing meaning: 



97 



(a) License: shall mean any and all licenses or per- 
mits, issued by any Town of Chelmford Board, 
division, officer, or department, and shall in- 
clude all renewals and transfers. 

(b) Licensing authority: any Town of Chelmsford 
Board, division, officer or department, with 
jurisdiction over the issuance of any license or 
permit. 

2. The Town of Chelmsford Board, division, officer or 
department, with jurisdiction over the issuance of any 
license, shall have the authority to deny any applica- 
tion for, or revoke or suspend any license within its 
jurisdiction, for any person, partnership, corporation, 
trust, business entity or enterprise who and/or which 
has neglected, refused, or failed to pay any local 
taxes, fees, assessments, betterments, or any other 
municipal charge. 

3. The Tax Collector or other municipal official respon- 
sible for records of all municipal taxes, assessments, 
betterments and other municipal charges, hereinafter 
referred to as the Tax Collector, shall annually fur- 
nish to each department, board, commission or divi- 
sion, hereinafter referred to as the licensing authority, 
that issues licenses or permits including renewals and 
transfers, a list of any person, partnership, corpora- 
tion, trust, business entity or enterprise, hereinafter 
referred to as the party, that has neglected or refus- 
ed to pay any local taxes, fees, assessments, bet- 
terments or other municipal charges for not less than 
a twelve month period, and that such party has not 
filed in good faith a pending application for an 
abatement of such tax or a pending petition before 
the appellate tax board. 

4. The licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend 
any license or permit, including renewals and 
transfers of any party whose name appears on said 
list furnished to the licensing authority from the Tax 
Collector; provided, however, that written notice is 
given to the party and the Tax Collector, as required 
by applicable provisions of law, and the party is given 
a hearing, to be held not earlier than fourteen days 
after said notice. Said list shall be prima facie 
evidence for denial, revocation or suspension of said 
license or permit to any party. The Tax Collector shall 
have the right to intervene in any hearing conducted 
with respect to such license denial, revocation or 
suspension. Any findings made by the licensing 
authority with respect to such denial, revocation or 
suspension shall be made only for the purposes of 
such proceeding and shall not be relevant to or in- 
troduced in any other proceeding at law, except for 
any appeal from such license denial, revocation or 
suspension. Any license or permit denied, suspend- 
ed or revoked under this section shall not be reissued 
or renewed until the license authority receives a cer- 
tificate issued by the Tax Collector that the party is 
in good standing with respect to any and all local 
taxes, fees, assessments, betterments or other 



municipal charges, payable to the municipality as the 
date of issuance of said certificate. 

5. Any party shall be given an opportunity to enter in- 
to a payment agreement, thereby allowing the licen- 
sing authority to issue a certificate indicating said 
limitations to the license or permit and the validity 
of said license shall be conditioned upon the satisfac- 
tory compliance with said agreement. Failure to com- 
ply with said agreement shall be grounds for the 
suspension or revocation of said license or permit; 
provided, however, that the holder be given notice 
and a hearing as required by applicable provisions 
of law. 

6. The Board of Selectmen may waive such denial, 
suspension or revocation if it finds there is no direct 
or indirect business interest by the property owner, 
its officers or stockholders, if any, or members of his 
immediate family, as defined in section one of chapter 
two hundred and sixty-eight in the business or ac- 
tivity conducted in or on said property. 

7. This by-law shall not apply to the following licenses 
and permits: open burning; section thirteen of 
chapter forty-eight; bicycle permits; section eleven 
A of chapter eighty-five; sales of articles for charitable 
purposes, section thirty-three of chapter one hundred 
and one; children work permits, section sixty-nine of 
chapter one hundred and forty-nine; clubs, associa- 
tions dispensing food or beverage licenses, section 
twenty-one E of chapter one hundred and forty; dog 
licenses, section one hundred and thirty-seven of 
chapter one hundred and forty; fishing, hunting, 
trapping license, section twelve of chapter one hun- 
dred and thirty-one; marriage licenses, section 
twenty-eight of chapter two hundred and seven and 
theatrical events, public exhibition permits, section 
one hundred and eighty-one of chapter one hundred 
and forty. 

Normand Lebrecque moved to take Article 18 out of 
order. The Finance Committee and the Board of Select- 
men were against the motion. A discussion took place. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. 



UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman John Emerson, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire any and all temporary and/or permanent 
easements, and any property in fee simple with the 
buildings and trees thereon, by purchase, by eminent do- 
main or otherwise, the following parcels A-D described as 
follows: 

Parcel A. 

Parcel Numbers 1, la, and 2 on a certain plan on 
file with the Town Engineer and incorporated here- 
with entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Chelmsford, 
MA prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 
1"40', by Vanasse/Hangen Engineering, Inc.-, Con- 



98 



suiting Engineers and Planners, 60 Birmingham 
Parkway, Boston, Massachusetts dated October 29, 
1984 sheet 2 of 6." 

Parcel B. 

Parcel Number 9 on a certain plan on file with the 
Town Engineer and incorporated herewith entitled 
"Easements Plan of Land in Chelmsford, MA 
prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1"40', 
by Vanasse/Hangen Engineering, Inc., Consulting 
Engineers and Planners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, 
Boston, Massachusetts dated October 29, 1984, sheet 
4 of 6." 

Parcel C. 

Parcel Numbers 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 on a certain plan 
on file with the Town Engineer entitled "Easement 
Plan of Land in Chelmsford, MA prepared for the 
Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1"40', by Vanasse/Hangen 
Engineering, Inc., Consulting Engineers and Plan- 
ners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, Boston, Massachu- 
setts dated October 29, 1984, sheet 5 of 6." 

Parcel D. 

Parcel Number 10 on a certain plan on file with the 
Town Engineer and incorporated herewith entitled 
"Easement Plan of Land in Chelmsford, MA 
prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1"40', 
by Vanasse/Hangen Engineering, Inc., Consulting 
Engineers and Planners, 60 Birmingham Parkway, 
Boston, Massachusetts, dated October 19, 1984, sheet 
6 of 6." 

for the purpose of construction improvements, widen- 
ing, laying out and accepting said portion of Billerica 
Road and I move that the Town vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of four dollars ($4.00) to defray 
all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection 
with the acquisition of said land and for paying any 
damages which may be awarded as the result of any 
such taking. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman John Emerson, 
moved that the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of two thousand five hundred thirty-five dollars and 
forty cents ($2,535.40) with which to meet bills of previous 
years. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

Selectman John Emerson moved to take Article 14 out 
of order. He explained that Articles 12, 13, and 14, all per- 
tain to the same subject, and felt that Article 14 should 
be heard first. The action taken might make a difference 
with the other two articles. Selectmen Henrick Johnson, 



spoke against the motion to take Article 14 out of order. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of taking the article 
out of order. A lengthy discussion took place. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 The Board of Selectmen were 
against this article. Chairman of the Finance Committee 
Elizabeth Marshall, spoke against the article. A lengthy 
discussion followed. A number of residents spoke against 
the article. Linda Allen moved the question to stop debate. 
The Moderator asked if there was any need for further 
discussion, hearing none he asked for a voice vote on the 
article, motion defeated. (See warrant for original wording 
of the article.) 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Henrick Johnson 
spoke against the article. He felt that the Town should not 
buy the land without knowing if the land is contaminated 
or not. The Finance Committee was against the article. 
Selectman Bonita Towle spoke in favor of buying the land, 
as did Selectman Dennis Ready. A discussion followed. 
Selectman Ready moved to amend the motion that the emi- 
nent domain taking shall be contingent upon a vote of the 
town to exempt the bonding from the provisions of Pro- 
position 2 1 /2 . The Finance Committee was in favor of the 
motion to amend. More lengthy discussion took place. 
Harold Pierce moved the question to stop debate on the 
motion to amend. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to stop debate, motion carried unanimous- 
ly. The Moderator then asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to amend, motion defeated. More discussion took 
piace. Edward Hilliard moved the question to stop debate. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator then asked for a voice vote 
on the article, motion defeated. The Chair was question- 
ed on the voice vote. The Moderator explained then when 
an article is defeated there is no need for an actual hand 
count. He asked for a show of hands, and declared the ar- 
ticle defeated. (See warrant for original wording of the 
article.) 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 A discussion took place. Select- 
man Dennis Ready moved to amend the article. By inser- 
ting the following wording after the word development in 
the first sentence, "proposed in the City of Lowell." The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the motion. Joseph 
Campobaso moved to amend the motion. After a discus- 
sion, he withdrew his motion. More discussion took place. 
Andrew Sims asked the Moderator for permission for Lowell 
resident Sharon Zawacki, who was a member of the Lowell 
Highlands Council to speak before the Town Meeting Body. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 
Sharon Zawacki came forward and presented facts and 
figures about the trash plant, which was being proposed 
to be built on the City of Lowell/Town of Chelmsford Line. 
Samuel Poulton moved to amend the motion by inserting 
the words "in opposition to" after the word report, in the 
first sentence. Discussion took place. The Moderator ask- 
ed for voice vote on Selectman Ready's motion. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Moderator then asked for the 
Finance Committee's recommendation in regards to Samuel 
Poul ton's motion to amend. The Finance Committee was 



99 



against the motion. James Harrington, Town Counsel, 
recommended that the Town Meeting Body vote against 
the motion. Samuel Poulton moved to withdraw his mo- 
tion, and he also moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked if there was any need for further debate 
by voice vote, motion carried to stop debate. The 
Moderator then asked for a voice vote on the main motion 
as amended, motion carried, unanimously. The article 
reads as follows: 

Selectman John Emerson, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, ap- 
praisers, attorneys and other necessary consultants for the 
purpose of preparing a study and report on the develop- 
ment proposed in the City of Lowell and establishment of 
a Resource Recovery Facility and to determine any effects 
of said facility on the Town of Chelmsford and to execute 
all necessary and proper contracts and agreements, and 
further I move that the town vote to amend Article 38 of 
the Annual Town Meeting of 1985 to remove the condi- 
tions regarding the payment of funds, and appropriate and 
transfer therefrom, the sum of one hundred twenty-five 
thousand dollars ($125,000.00) to defray all necessary costs, 
fees and expenses, with all said contracts to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman John Emerson, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to engage engineers, appraisers, attorneys, architects, and 
other necessary consultants for the purpose of preparing 
and designing all documents required to design and con- 
struct repairs to the Center Fire Station for the Town of 
Chelmsford, and further I move that the town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute 
all necessary and proper contracts and agreements thereto, 
and further I move that the Town vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of forty-five thousand dollars 
($45,000.00) to defray all necessary costs, fees, and ex- 
penses. 

A discussion took place. Harry Pierce moved the ques- 
tion to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote on the article, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee, Elizabeth Marshall, moved that the Town raise and 
appropriate the sum of forty-six thousand two hundred six- 
ty dollars ($46,260.00) and transfer the same to line Item 
65 — Nashoba Valley Regional High School Assessments. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman John Emerson, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire in fee simple by purchase, eminent domain, or 
otherwise, the property with trees thereon located on Flet- 
cher Street, in the Town of Chelmsford, and further des- 
cribed as Parcel 1 and Parcel 2 on a certain plan filed with 
the Town Engineer entitled, "Plan Showing Takings for 
Widening of Fletcher Street, Chelmsford, Massachusetts", 



prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1"=20', 
September 8, 1986 by Harry R. Feldman, Inc. Land 
Surveyors, 112 Shawmut Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts for 
the purpose of constructing improvements and widening 
Fletcher Street as part of the Chelmsford Street/Fletcher 
Street intersection improvements and I move that the town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of thirteen thousand 
eight hundred dollars ($13,800.00) and appropriate and 
transfer the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000.00) from 
Article 21 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1985 to defray 
all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with 
the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages 
which may be awarded as a result of any such taking. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Selectman John Emerson, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to rescind the acceptance of the pro- 
visions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 48, Section 
42, or corresponding provisions of earlier laws, as accepted 
at the Annual Town Meeting in 1954 establishing a fire 
department to be under the control of officer to be known 
as the chief of the department, and I move that the town 
vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 48, Section 42 A, establishing a fire department 
under the direction of the Selectman. 

The Finance Committee was against the article. Select- 
man Ready spoke in favor of the article. Edward Quinn, 
former Deputy Chief, spoke against the article. He explain- 
ed that the department's budget is controlled through the 
bid process, or union contract, which is done through the 
Board of Selectmen. He explained that a weak chief is sub- 
ject to political pressures, and could in fact be fired at any 
point in time. Under the strong chief before the chief could 
be fired, he/she would be required to have a hearing, and 
told the reason for the firing. That way there is a little pro- 
tection for the chief and avoids political pressure. Select- 
man Towle spoke in favor. Harold Pierce, stated that he 
has been a firefighter for twenty-five years with the Town, 
spoke against the article. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Wayne Richardson, Petitioner, 
moved to withdraw this article with the following statement. 
This petition for amendment to the Mass. General Laws 
is a valid one, but before being voted upon by this body. 
I as the initiator request that it be withdrawn, pending fur- 
ther clarification of the Authority already granted under 
the applicable sections of the law. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 

Due to no further business being at hand, the Moderator 
declared the meeting adjourned. Motion carried. 
unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 11:30 PM. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



100 



WARRANT FOR STATE PRIMARY 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MICHAEL J. CONNOLLY, SECRETARY 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote 
at their several polling places, Viz: 

Precinct 1. Town Office Building Gymnasium 

50 Billerica Road 
Precinct 2. Harrington School Gym Richardson Road 
Precinct 3. Harrington School Gym Richardson Road 
Precinct 4. Westland School Gym Dalton Road 
Precinct 5. Byam School Cafeteria Maple Road 
Precinct 6. Westland School Cafeteria Dalton Road 
Precinct 7. Harrington School Gym Richardson Road 
Precinct 8. McCarthy Junior High School, Cafeteria 

North Road 
Precinct 9. South Row School, Cafeteria 

Boston Road 
Precinct 10. South Row School, Cafeteria 

Boston Road 
Precinct 11. Westland School, Cafeteria Dalton Road 
Precinct 12. McCarthy Junior High School, Cafeteria 

North Road 

On Tuesday, the sixteenth (16th) day of September, 
1986, from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the can- 
didates of Political parties for the following offices: 



Governor 

Lt. Governor 

Attorney General 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Auditor 



For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 



Councillor 

Senator in General Court 

Representative in 

General Court 

District Attorney 

Sheriff 

County Commissioner 



Third Councillor District 
Fifth Senatorial District 
16th MLDS Representative 
District 

Northern District 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex County 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 25th day of August 1986. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. Emerson, Jr., 

Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, 

Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren 
Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Selectmen of the 
Town of Chelmsford 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



August 28, 1986 



Representative in Congress Fifth Congressional District 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Town Office Building Gym; Harrington School 
Gym; Harrington School Gym; Westland School Gym; 
Byam School Cafeteria; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
Harrington School Gym; McCarthy Jr. High Cafeteria; 
South Row School Cafeteria; South Row School 
Cafeteria; Westland School Cafeteria; McCarthy Jr. High 
School Cafeteria seven days at least before the time ap- 
pointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence, Constable of Chelmsford 



101 



GOVERNOR 

Gregory S. Hyatt 
Royall H. Switzler 
George Kariotis* 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



REPUBLICAN PRIMARY 

September 16, 1986 

Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 

65 74 74 11 85 62 35 59 52 71 30 72 649 

44 24 47 8 66 40 23 48 35 48 25 34 462 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Nicholas M. Nikitas 
Blanks 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Edward F. Harrington 
Blanks 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

Deborah R. Cochran 
Blanks 



238 


2064 


168 


1435 


70 


629 



TREASURER 

L. Joyce Hampers 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

AUDITOR 

Andrew S. Natsios 
William Bill Robinson 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



1434 
630 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th Dist. 

All Others 
Blanks 



205 
206 



230 
232 



240 
245 



225 
226 



222 
223 



2046 
2064 



COUNCILLOR 3rd Dist. 












All Others 





1 











Blanks 


206 


85 


232 


31 


245 


TOTAL 


206 


85 


232 


31 


245 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 5th Mldsx. Dist. 












Paul Reid 


119 


53 


133 


14 


140 


All Others 

















Blanks 


87 


32 


99 


17 


105 



225 
226 



223 
223 



2063 
2064 



TOTAL 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 16th Mldsx. Dii 

Carol C. Cleven 

William Logan* 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



942 

895 



13 226 
238 2064 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY Northe 

All Others 

Blanks 



205 
206 



245 
245 



225 
226 



222 
223 



238 2060 
238 2064 



SHERIFF Mldsx. Cty. 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Mldsx. Cty. 

Albert Joseph Onessimo 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



206 
206 



228 
232 



242 
245 



225 


178 


223 


118 


237 


2052 


226 


178 


223 


120 


238 


2064 


111 


74 


102 


72 


131 


1081 


1 








2 





4 


114 


104 


121 


46 


107 


979 


226 


178 


223 


120 


238 


2064 



•♦Write-in Candidate 
•re-election 

GOVERNOR 

Michael S. Dukakis* 
George Kariotis** 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Gerard DAmico 
Evelyn E Murphy 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

James M. Shannon 
JoAnn Shotwell 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

Michael Joseph Connolly* 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



102 

DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY 

September 16, 1986 

Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



222 
67 



192 


2322 





3 


1 


9 


79 


962 


272 


3296 


76 


1093 


179 


2010 



2459 
667 



TREASURER 

Robert Q. Crane* 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



1105 
3296 



AUDITOR 

A. Joseph DeNucci 
Maura A. Hennigan 
Charles Calvin Yancy 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



1437 
966 
235 
658 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th Dist. 

Chester G. Atkins* 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



902 
3296 



COUNCILLOR 3rd Dist. 

Herbert L. Connolly* 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



1299 
3296 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 5th Mldsx. Dist. 

Carol C. Amick* 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 16th Mldsx. Dist. 

John P. Emerson Jr. 

Bonita Towle 

William Logan** 

Carol eleven** 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Northern Dist. 

L. Scott Harshbarger* 
Stephen J. McGrail 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

SHERIFF 

John P. McGonigle* 
Henry E. Sullivan 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



1414 
1413 



373 
3296 



204 
3296 



2031 
308 



103 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER Mldsx. Dist. 

Bill Schmidt 

Barbara J. Auger Collins 

Anthony D. Pini 

Paul Harold Sullivan 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



1545 
495 



WARRANT FOR 

STATE ELECTION 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MICHAEL J. CONNOLLY, SECRETARY 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the inhabitants of said 
town who are qualified to vote in State Election to vote at 
their several polling places, Viz: 



Precinct 1: 

Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 

Precinct 9: 
Precinct 10 
Precinct 11: 
Precinct 12 



Town Office Building Gymnasium, 50 
Billerica Road 

Harrington School Gym, Richardson Road 
Harrington School Gym, Richardson Road 
Westland School Cafeteria, Dalton Road 
Byam School Cafeteria, Maple Road 
Westland School Cafeteria, Dalton Road 
Harrington School Gym, Richardson Road 
McCarthy Middle School; Little Gym- 
nasium, North Road 

South Row School Cafeteria, Boston Road 
South Row School Cafeteria, Boston Road 
Westland School Cafeteria, Dalton Road 
McCarthy Middle School, Little Gym- 
nasium, North Road 



On Tuesday, the fourth (4th) day of November, 1986, 
from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for the following purpose: 

Governor/ Lt. Governor For the Commonwealth 

Attorney General For the Commonwealth 

Secretary For the Commonwealth 

Treasurer For the Commonwealth 

Auditor For the Commonwealth 

Representative in Congress Fifth Congressional District 

Councillor Third Councillor District 

Senator in General Court Fifth Middlesex Senatorial 
District 



Representative in General Court 16th Mlds. Represen- 
tative District 

District Attorney Northern District 

Sheriff Middlesex County 

County Commissioner Middlesex County 

County Charter Commissioner Middlesex County 

QUESTION A 

Shall a charter study commission be created 
by study the present governmental structure of 
Middlesex County to consider and make find- 
ings concerning the form of government and YES 
make recommendations thereon? NO 

In the counties of: Barnstable, Berkshire, 
Essex, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Mid- 
dlesex, Plymouth, Worcester. 

QUESTION 1 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an 
amendment to the Constitution summarized 
below, which was approved by the General 
Court in joint sessions of the House ofRepresen- YES 
tatives and the Senate on fune 27, 1984 by a NO 
vote of 120-67, and on April 30, 1986 by a vote 
of 123-69 

SUMMARY 

The proposed constitutional amendment would allow 
the legislature to prohibit or regulate abortions to the 
extent permitted by the United States Constitution. It 
would also provide that the state constitution does not 
require public or private funding of abortions, or the 
provision of services or facilities for performing abor- 
tions, beyond what is required by the United States Con- 
stitution. The provisions of this amendment would not 
apply to abortions required to prevent the death of the 
mother. 

QUESTION 2 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an 
amendment to the Constitution summarized 
below, which was approved by the General 
Court in joint sessions of the House of Represen- 
tatives and the Senate on December YES 
12, 1984 by a vote of 108-79, and on April 16, NO 
1986 by a vote of 107-87? 



104 



SUMMARY 

The proposed constitutional amendment would allow 
the expenditure of public funds for private schools and 
private school students. 

It would remove primary and secondary schools from 
the list of non-public institutions barred from receiv- 
ing public aid and would allow public money, property, 
or loans of credit to be used for founding, maintain- 
ing, or aiding those schools. The proposed amendment 
would also allow public financial aid, materials, or ser- 
vices to be provided to a non- public school student re- 
questing such aid, but only if that school does not 
discriminate in its entrance requirements on the basis 
of race, color, national origin, religious belief, sex, or 
physical handicap. The state legislature would have the 
power to impose limits on aid, materials, or services pro- 
vided to students. 

QUESTION 3 

LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, 
which was disapproved by the House of Rep- 
resentatives on May 6, 1986, by a vote of 49-93, YES 
and on which no vote was taken by the Senate NO 
before May 7, 1986? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed law would reduce and then repeal the 
T l /2% surtax on Massachusetts state income taxes and 
would limit state tax revenue growth to the level of 
growth in total wages and salaries of the citizens of the 
state. 

It would set the rate of the surtax on Massachusetts 
state income taxes at 3 % % for tax years beginning dur- 
ing 1986, and it would repeal the surtax for tax years 
beginning on or after January 1, 1987. 

The allowable state tax revenues for any fiscal year 
are limited to the allowable state tax revenues for the 
prior fiscal year as increased by the average rate of 
growth of Massachusetts wages and salaries for the three 
immediately preceding calendar years. For purposes of 
calculating the proposed limit for fiscal year 1987, 
allowable state tax revenues for fiscal 1986 are the net 
tax revenues for that fiscal year, but excluding revenues 
derived from the surtax on state personal income tax. 
Further, if in any fiscal year the calculation of the limit 
results in allowable state tax revenues less than the 
amount of allowable state tax revenues for the prior year, 
then allowable state tax revenues for that fiscal year shall 
be equal to the allowable state tax revenues for the prior 
year. The revenues limited by this law would not include 
non-tax revenues such as federal reimbursements, tui- 
tions, fees and earnings on investments. 

The amount of allowable state tax revenues for any 
fiscal year would have to be reduced if a new state law 
were enacted allowing local governments to impose new 
or increased taxes or excises. The reduction would be 
equal to the amount of revenue derived from the new 
tax or increase. The reduction in state tax revenues 
would first take effect in the fiscal year following the 
enactment of the new law authorizing new local taxes 
or increases. 



If state tax revenues exceed the limit imposed by the 
proposed law, as determined by the State Auditor, a tax 
credit would have to be granted equal to the total 
amount of excess tax revenue. The credit would be ap- 
plied to the then current personal income tax liability 
of all taxpayers in proportion to their personal income 
tax liability in the preceding year. 

The provisions of this Act could be enforced in court 
by a group of taxpayers. 

QUESTION 4 

LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, 
which was approved by the House of Represen- 
tatives on May 5, 1986, by a vote of 145-0, and YES 
on which no vote was taken by the Senate before NO 
May 7, 1986? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed law would require the state Department 
of Environmental Quality Engineering (DEQE) to search 
for sites in the Commonwealth where oil or hazardous 
materials have been disposed of and to take all steps 
necessary to clean up those sites within specified time 
limits. Provisions are made for informing the public 
about sites in their communities. 

Beginning on January 15, 1987, DEQE would be re- 
quired to publish lists every three months of all sites 
where it has confirmed that uncontrolled oil or hazar- 
dous materials have been disposed of and locations to 
be investigated as possible disposal sites. The lists would 
describe what actions have been taken at each site or 
location. DEQE would be required to list, to the extent 
that it has identified, at least 400 possible disposal sites 
by January 15, 1987, 600 additional locations by January 
15, 1988, and 1,000 additional locations in each subse- 
quent year. 

Within one year after a location is listed as a possible 
disposal site DEQE would be required to determine if 
further investigation is warranted. If so, within two years 
after the listing, DEQE must confirm whether the loca- 
tion is a disposal site, and whether it poses an immi- 
nent or substantial hazard to health, safety, public 
welfare or the environment. 

For sites found to pose a substantial hazard, DEQE 
would be required, within the next two years, to ensure 
that those hazards are eliminated and to develop a plan 
to eliminate permanently future risks from those sites. 
Imminent hazards would have to be eliminated im- 
mediately. For sites found not to pose any substantial 
hazards DEQE must, within seven years after the listing, 
ensure that the full extent of contamination is evaluated 
and that a plan to eliminate permanently future risks 
is developed. 

The proposed law would require DEQE to provide 
public notice and encourage public participation. 
Within 30 days after completing a site investigation, DE- 
QE would have to inform the public through local news- 
papers of the results of that investigation and of the 
rights of local citizens under the state law. If ten citizens 
of a town potentially affected by a site submit a request, 
DEQE would be required to develop a plan for involv- 



105 



ing the public in its cleanup decisions and present that 
plan at a public meeting. The chief municipal officer 
of a city or town in which a disposal site is located could 
appoint individual(s) to inspect the site on behalf of the 
community. 

Massachusetts residents could bring lawsuits to enforce 
the provisions of the proposed law or to lessen a hazard 
related to oil or hazardous materials. If such a lawsuit 
is brought, a court could award costs, including rea- 
sonable fees for attorneys and expert witnesses. 



QUESTION 5 

REFERENDUM ON AN EXISTING LAW 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, 
which was approved by the House of Represen- 
tatives on October 17, 1985, by a vote of 77-62, YES 
and, which was approved by the Senate on NO 
October 17, 1985? 

SUMMARY 

The law requires all drivers and passengers to wear 
properly adjusted and fastened safety belts while travel- 
ing in motor vehicles on public ways. It does not apply 
to: children under five years old who are required by 
another law to wear safety belts or be restrained in safety 
car seats; passengers in vehicles where all safety belts 
are being used by others; passengers in buses; persons 
riding in vehicles built before July 1, 1966, or in which 
safety belts were not installed as original equipment; or 
persons who are certified by a physician to be physical- 
ly unable to use safety belts. The law also does not app- 
ly to police officers, rural mail carriers, or drivers or 
passengers of other vehicles that stop frequently and 
travel at speeds not exceeding 15 miles per hour between 
stops. 

Drivers or passengers sixteen years or older who do 
not wear safety belts are subject to a $15.00 fine. The 
driver of a vehicle is also subject to a $15 . 00 fine for each 
passenger under sixteen who does not wear a safety belt. 
This law, however, can be enforced only if the driver is 
stopped for a violation of another motor vehicle law. 
Safety belt violations will not result in surcharges on 
motor vehicle insurance premiums. The law also re- 
quires that when the Commissioner of Insurance sets 
motor vehicle insurance rates, the rates must reflect any 
savings attributable to increased use of safety belts. 

The law also requires that all motor vehicles manufac- 
tured after September 1, 1989, that are sold or registered 
in Massachusetts be equipped with crash protection 
devices, as specified by federal regulations. Any 
manufacturer who sells or delivers motor vehicles that 
are not equipped with such safety devices will be sub- 
ject to a fine of not more than $100 for each sale or 
delivery. This law is not intended to eliminate the federal 
requirements for passive crash protection devices in 
motor vehicles. 

The law also provides that a non-binding question, 
unlike this binding referendum, shall be placed on the 
1986 general election ballot asking whether the voters 
approve of the law. 



QUESTION 6 

LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, 
which was disapproved by the House of Rep- 
resentatives on May 6, 1986, by a vote of 56-93, YES 
and on which no vote was taken by the Senate NO 
before May 7, 1986? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed law would provide a system of voter 
registration by mail applicable to all qualified voters and 
would eliminate statutory provisions permitting certain 
persons to vote only for presidential electors. 

Under this proposed law, the State Secretary would 
be required to prepare blank forms for affidavits of 
registration. The Secretary and local boards of registrars 
would be required to make such forms available to any 
person eligible to vote in whatever quantity the person 
requests and to transmit such forms, upon written re- 
quest, to any person claiming to be qualified to vote. 
Registrars would also be required to make these forms 
available at all post offices and at other places within 
their municipalities. The Secretary would be required 
to establish a reasonable fee for providing more than 
50 forms and to prepare instructions to accompany the 
forms. 

A person seeking to register to vote would be required 
to complete the affidavit of registration and sign it under 
oath in the presence of a witness who is at least eigh- 
teen years old. The witness would be required to certify 
that the affidavit was signed in his presence and to date 
the affidavit. 

A completed affidavit of registration could be either 
delivered or mailed to the appropriate registrar's office. 
If, from the facts set forth in the affidavit, it appears 
that the person is qualified to vote, the registrars would 
be required to add the person's name to the list of 
registered voters and to so notify the person by first-class, 
non-forwardable mail, unless the person's name already 
appears on the local list of residents at the same address. 
The cost of mailing such notices would be assumed by 
the Commonwealth, subject to appropriation. If in any 
year the General Court fails to appropriate funds for 
that purpose, such notices would not have to be sent. 
If such a notice is returned undelivered, the city or town 
clerk would be required to instruct election officials to 
challenge the person's right to vote at the next election 
in which he attempts to vote. 

The proposed law would also impose criminal 
penalties of imprisonment for up to two years or a fine 
up to $2,000 for knowingly or willfully making a false 
affidavit, taking a false oath, or signing a false certificate 
relative to the qualifications or registration of any per- 
son to vote. 

QUESTION 7 
THIS QUESTION IS NONBINDING 

Shall the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
urge the United States Congress to enact a YES 
national health program which: NO 



106 



provides high quality comprehensive per- 
sonal health care including preventive, curative 
and occupational health services; is universal 
in coverage, community controlled, rationally 
organized, equitably financed, with no out-of- 
pocket charges, is sensitive to the particular 
health needs of all, and is efficient in contain- 
ing its cost; and whose yearly expenditure does 
not exceed the proportion of the Gross National 
Product spent on health care in the immediate- 
ly preceding fiscal year? 

QUESTION 8 

THIS QUESTION IS NONBINDING 

Shall the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
urge the Presidential of the United States and 
the United States Congress to enact a national 
acid rain control program which would require 
a fifty percent reduction in total national sulfur 
dioxide emissions by the hear nineteen hundred 
and ninety-five and which would allocate the 
required reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions, 
and the costs of achieving those reductions, 
equitably among the states? 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



YES 
NO 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



October 22, 1986 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Town Office Building Gym; Harrington School 
Gym; Harrington School Gym; Westland School Cafeteria; 
Byam School Cafeteria; Westland School Cafeteria; Harr- 
ington School Gym; McCarthy Middle School, Little Gym- 
nasium; South Row School Cafeteria; South Row School 
Cafeteria; Westland School Cafeteria; McCarthy Middle 
School Little Gymnasium seven days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said election. 

Given under our hands this 21st day of October, 1986. 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Selectmen of the Town of Chelmsford 



*re-election 

GOVERNOR/LT. GOVERNOR 

Dukakis and Murphy 

Kariotis and Nikitas 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Edward F. Harrington 

James M. Shannon 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

Michael Joseph Connolly Jr.* 
Deborah R. Cochran 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



STATE ELECTION 

November 4, 1986 



Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



530 
408 



642 
546 



389 
289 



457 
256 



392 
245 



825 692 1246 



393 
267 



560 
480 



5774 
4731 



710 1084 10996 



21 380 
1084 10996 



6006 
4131 



71 858 
1084 10996 






107 



TREASURER 

Robert Q Crane* 
L. Joyce Hampers 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



479 
444 



376 
359 



299 
343 



447 
584 



4902 
5460 



53 633 
1084 10996 



AUDITOR 

A. Joseph DeNucci 
Wm. Bill Robinson 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



422 
500 



375 
244 



469 
427 



323 
305 



533 
603 



337 453 4968 

331 553 5120 

42 78 908 

710 1084 10996 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th District 

Chester G. Atkins* 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNCILLOR 3rd District 

Herbert L. Connolly* 
Blanks 



SENATOR IN GENERAL CT. 5th District 
Carol C. Amick* 
Paul Reid 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL CT. 16th Mldsx. Dist. 

Carol C. Cleven 

John P. Emerson, Jr. 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Northern Dist. 

L. Scott Harshbarger* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



350 


194 


398 


99 


405 


276 


219 


286 


232 


417 


205 


351 


3432 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


585 


427 


791 


241 


847 


626 


489 


465 


413 


742 


448 


632 


6706 


429 


247 


498 


118 


503 


353 


285 


360 


279 


504 


262 


452 


4290 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


613 


461 


819 


226 


868 


629 


499 


500 


453 


789 


440 


691 


6988 


306 


155 


403 


93 


401 


261 


194 


285 


191 


371 


214 


349 


3223 


95 


58 


67 


40 


81 


89 


81 


40 


48 


86 


56 


44 


785 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


588 


262 


770 


141 


726 


490 


355 


539 


367 


763 


342 


695 


6038 


360 


359 


469 


193 


562 


417 


360 


251 


293 


410 


326 


355 


4355 


1 














3 


1 





3 





1 


2 


11 


65 


53 


50 


25 


62 


69 


58 


35 


29 


73 


41 


32 


592 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


690 


481 


898 


273 


972 


698 


558 


560 


476 


840 


509 


752 


7707 


324 


193 


391 


86 


378 


281 


216 


265 


216 


406 


201 


332 


3289 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 



SHERIFF Middlesex Cty. 

John P. McGonigle 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER MIdsx. Cty. 

Bill Schmidt* 

Albert Joseph Ouessimo 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY CHARTER COMM. 3rd Dist. 

Robert W. Keough 
Dennis J. Ready 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION A 

Yes 



No 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 1 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION 2 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 
TOTAL 



355 


212 


440 


97 


452 


330 


241 


320 


252 


451 


221 


408 


3779 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


415 


371 


604 


208 


653 


476 


385 


347 


323 


575 


367 


467 


5191 


399 


187 


474 


96 


449 


312 


245 


335 


216 


438 


233 


428 


3812 


200 


116 


211 


55 


248 


191 


144 


143 


153 


233 


110 


189 


1993 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


186 


135 


184 


64 


195 


168 


124 


163 


116 


214 


137 


199 


1885 


666 


443 


937 


250 


998 


659 


523 


557 


480 


872 


493 


767 


7645 


162 


96 


168 


45 


157 


152 


127 


105 


96 


160 


80 


118 


1466 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


510 


348 


751 


172 


739 


560 


417 


440 


397 


668 


367 


647 


6016 


338 


219 


427 


139 


479 


308 


258 


290 


230 


410 


241 


326 


3665 


166 


107 


111 


48 


132 


111 


99 


95 


65 


168 


102 


111 


1315 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


382 


292 


523 


164 


480 


402 


315 


303 


295 


476 


293 


459 


4384 


571 


337 


725 


170 


810 


522 


419 


487 


376 


734 


374 


591 


6116 


61 


45 


41 


25 


60 


55 


40 


35 


21 


36 


43 


34 


496 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


223 


198 


321 


116 


269 


249 


177 


196 


163 


301 


184 


258 


2655 


745 


434 


943 


228 


1036 


694 


562 


602 


516 


916 


496 


797 


7969 


46 


42 


25 


15 


45 


36 


35 


27 


13 


29 


30 


29 


372 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 



108 



QUESTION 3 

Yes 
No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 
QUESTION 4 



Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION 5 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION 6 

Yes 
No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 7 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION 8 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 
TOTAL 



586 


392 


768 


215 


796 


548 


472 


507 


432 


797 


408 


671 


6592 


344 


230 


473 


110 


468 


350 


253 


275 


224 


386 


245 


355 


3713 


84 


52 


48 


34 


86 


81 


49 


43 


36 


63 


57 


58 


691 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


624 


432 


871 


239 


918 


651 


526 


546 


503 


831 


467 


719 


7327 


293 


181 


363 


86 


347 


243 


182 


234 


156 


347 


177 


304 


2913 


97 


61 


55 


34 


85 


85 


66 


45 


33 


68 


66 


61 


756 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


439 


242 


643 


126 


604 


445 


281 


429 


309 


559 


276 


578 


4931 


507 


396 


616 


212 


702 


479 


459 


368 


366 


643 


391 


481 


5620 


68 


36 


30 


21 


44 


55 


34 


28 


17 


44 


43 


25 


445 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


291 


180 


440 


116 


441 


297 


214 


261 


205 


422 


213 


340 


3420 


23 


427 


776 


203 


821 


585 


482 


510 


445 


747 


430 


673 


6722 


100 


67 


73 


40 


88 


97 


78 


54 


42 


77 


67 


71 


854 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


515 


361 


689 


194 


728 


517 


452 


376 


385 


655 


379 


532 


5783 


392 


243 


535 


126 


537 


357 


258 


390 


274 


524 


264 


487 


4387 


107 


70 


65 


39 


85 


105 


64 


59 


33 


67 


67 


65 


826 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 


740 


483 


1031 


260 


1037 


717 


574 


630 


538 


960 


547 


840 


8357 


185 


130 


205 


67 


239 


180 


152 


144 


126 


221 


113 


202 


1964 


89 


61 


53 


32 


74 


82 


48 


51 


28 


65 


50 


42 


675 


1014 


674 


1289 


359 


1350 


979 


774 


825 


692 


1246 


710 


1084 


10996 



109 



WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

DECEMBER 8, 1986 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School 
Auditorium on Monday evening, the 8th day of December 
1986, at 7:30 p.m.. then and there to act upon the follow- 
ing Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws, Article VII — Miscellaneous, Section 1. 
Regulation of Dogs, by deleting paragraph 5. Licenses 
fees in its entirety and substituting the following in its place: 

5. LICENSE FEES 

The fee for every dog licensed shall be as follows: 

Five Dollars ($5.00) for every neutered male dog. 
Five Dollars ($5.00) for every spayed female dog. 
Five Dollars ($5.00) for every male and female dog. 

Determination of licensing eligibility, dogs not required to 
be licensed, or refunding license fees, shall be determined 
as set out in Section 139. 

The fee for every kennel license shall be as follows: 

Ten Dollars ($10.00) for every kennel license for 
4 dogs or less 

Twenty-five Dollars for every kennel license for 
($25.00) over 4 but not over 10 



and the Annual Town Meeting shall be held on the last 
Monday of the same month. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by deleting the present Zon- 
ing Map and substituting the redrafted Map proposed by 
the Planning Board, as filed with the Town Clerk, and 
displayed at the Special Town Meeting; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
and/or transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization 
Fund, a certain sum of money to the appropriate salary 
line items to fund approved wage and salary increases in 
the following departmental accounts: 

Police Department 

and any other departmental budget recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen at Special Town Meeting; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
and/or transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization 
Fund, a certain sum of money to the appropriate salary 
line items to fund approved wage and salary increases in 
the following departmental accounts: 

Accounting Department 

and any other departmental budget recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen at Special Town Meeting; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 



Fifty Dollars ($50.00) for every kennel license for 
over 10 dogs. 

All the fees shall be increased by Five Dollars ($5.00) on 
the first day of the second month following the required 
licensing period, as outlined in Section 3 (a) of this By- 
Law, and by an additional Five Dollars ($5.00) on the first 
day of each succeeding month; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Clerk 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws, by deleting Article II, Section 1. Time 
of Annual Meeting, in its entirety, and substituting the 
following in its place: 

SECTION 1 TIME OF ANNUAL MEETING -The 

Annual Election shall be held on the First Tuesday of April 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization Fund, 
transfer and appropriate revenue sharing funds, borrow 
and/or petition the Great and General Court to enact 
legislation to allow the Town to borrow, by bond or note 
a certain sum of money to engage engineers, contractors, 
attorneys, architects, and other necessary consultants 
and/or builders, for the purpose of preparing, designing 
and constructing a Senior Center and the preparation of 
all necessary documentation thereto, on the property under 
the control of the Board of Selectmen at the North School 
and being a portion of the property taken by the Town of 
Chelmsford by order of taking dated January 17, 1951 and 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, 
Book 1161, Page 258, said contracts to be made under the 



110 



supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to see if the 
Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
negotiate and execute all necessary and proper contracts 
and agreement thereto, contingent upon the Town voting 
to exempt the debt associated with this project on a ques- 
tion on the ballot at either a state or local election pur- 
suant to Proposition 2V£; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer and appropriate from available 
funds a certain sum of money to be used for the installa- 
tion of a new flag pole on the North Common in Vinal 
Square, North Chelmsford, MA; or act in relation thereto. 

Park Commissioners 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
and/or transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization 
Fund a certain sum of money to prepare a new zoning by- 
law book, and to engage all engineers, attorneys and other 
necessary consultants thereto, and to execute all necessary 
and proper contracts and agreements, with said contracts 
and agreements to be under the supervision of the Plan- 
ning Board, or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds 
and/or transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization 
Fund a certain sum of money to engage a private accoun- 
ting firm to prepare an audit of the Towns financial records 
for the period ending June 30, 1986; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds 
and/or transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization 
Fund, a certain sum of money for funding the Town of 
Chelmsford matching share of the new medi-care tax, 
which is deducted from the wages earned by newly hired 
employees after March 1, 1986; or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds 
and/or transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization 
Fund the sum of eleven thousand dollars ($11,000.00) the 
purchase of a new stainless steel sander for the use by the 
Highway Department and to execute all necessary and pro- 
per contracts and agreements thereto, with said contracts 
and agreements to be under the supervision of the Board 
of Selectmen; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer and appropriate from available 
funds and/or transfer and appropriate from the Stabiliza- 
tion Fund a certain sum of money to the appropriate salary 
line items to fund approved wage and salary increases and 
expense allocations in departmental accounts to be recom- 
mended by the Board of Selectmen at the Special Town 
Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote as follows: 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of the Town of 
Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts: 

We, the undersigned, being registered voters in and of 
the Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, pursuant to 
M.G.L.A. Chapter 39, Section 10, as amended and 
M.G.L.A. Chapter 40A, Section 5, as amended, request 
the insertion in the warrant for the Town Meeting to be 
next held, the following amendment to the Zone Map and 
Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts: 

That the Zone Map and Zoning By-Laws be amended 
as follows: 

"The Zoning Map and accompanying ordinance passed 
and as most recently amended entitled "Zoning By-Laws 
of the Town of Chelmsford" is hereby amended by estab- 
lishing new lines and striking out the designation "Residen- 
tial "B" " (RB) District, as shown on said zone map and 
substituting in place thereof new lines and designation 
"Residential Multiple Family" (RM) District, insofar as said 
zone map relates to the following described premises: 

A certain parcel of land, situated on the southerly side 
of Littleton Road (Route 110), Chelmsford, Massachusetts, 
being shown as a parcel containing 15.1 acres on a plan 
of land entitled "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass., 
surveyed for Joseph Solomont" Scale 1"=80', Feb. 8, 1957, 
Dana F. Perkins & Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers & Surveyors, 
Reading, Mass., which plan is recorded with Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book of Plans 88, Plan 
176, being bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHERLY by said Littleton Road (Route 110), six 
hundred fifty-five and 97/100 (655.97) feet; 

EASTERLY by land of Theodore W. Emerson, as shown 
on said plan, now or formerly land of 
Chelmsford Elks, Inc., nine hundred forty- 
eight and 40/100 (948.40) feet; 

SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of Harold Becker, 
one hundred three and 81/100 (103.81) feet, 
and also by land of Arthur Burtt, as shown 
on said plan, now or formerly land of 
Charles H. Hopkins, Jr., et ux, by three 
courses by a stone wall, a total distance of 



Ill 



five hundred seventy and 78/100 (570.78) 
feet; and 

WESTERLY by land of MacCormick, as shown on said 
plan, now or formerly of Old Chelmsford 
Garrison House Association, Inc., by two 
courses, in part by a stone wall, a total dis- 
tance of seven hundred seventy-eight and 
15/100 (778.15) feet, and also by land of 
Stockton as shown on said plan, two hun- 
dred thirty-seven and 24/100 (237.24) feet. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer and appropriate from available 
funds, a certain sum of money for a feasibility study of 
parcels of land within the Town for purposes of construc- 
ting or expanding existing Public Library facilities, and 
for the preparation of preliminary architectural designs and 
drawings in connection therewith; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Library Trustees 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said election. 

Given under our hands this 17th day of December, 1986. 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Selectmen of the Town of Chelmsford 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



December 20, 1986 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Town Office Building Gym; Harrington School 
Gym; Harrington School Gym; Westland School Cafeteria; 
Byam School Cafeteria; Westland School Cafeteria; Harr- 
ington School Gym; McCarthy Middle School Little Gym- 
nasium; South Row School Cafeteria; South Row School 
Cafeteria; Westland School Cafeteria; McCarthy Middle 
School Little Gymnasium seven days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
DECEMBER 6, 1986 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 
p.m. by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, at the McCarthy 
Jr. High School Auditorium. The Moderator recognized the 
presence of a quorum, there were 424 voters present. 

The Moderator explained the Town Meeting process, and 
the rules and regulations. 

Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., moved that the reading 
of the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Select- 
man John P. Emerson Jr. , moved that the reading of the 
entire warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Town Clerk Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws, 
Article VII — Miscellaneous, Section 1. Regulation of 
Dogs, by deleting paragraph 5. Licenses fees in its entire- 
ty and substituting the following in its place; 

5. LICENSE FEES 

The fee for every dog licensed shall be as follows: 

Five Dollars ($5.00) for every neutered male 
dog. 

Five Dollars ($5.00) for every spayed female 
dog. 

Five Dollars ($5.00) for every male and female 
dog. 

Determination of licensing eligibility, dogs not required 
to be licensed, or refunding license fees, shall be determined 
as set out in Section 139. 

The fee for every kennel licenses shall be as follows: 

Ten Dollars ($10.00) for every kennel license for 
4 dogs or less. 

Twenty-five Dollars for every kennel license for 
($25.00) over 4 but not over 10 

dogs. 

Fifty Dollars ($50.00) for every kennel license for 
over 10 dogs. 

All the fees shall be increased by Five Dollars ($5.00) 
on the first day of the second month following the required 
licensing period, as outlined in Section 3 (a) of this By- 
Law, and by an additional Five Dollars ($5.00) on the first 
day of each succeeding month. 

Pennryn Fitts, Member of the Dog Pound Committee, 
explained the Article. The Board of Selectmen and the 
Finance Committee recommended the Article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the Article, motion 
carried, unanimously. 



112 



UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr. , 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws, 
by deleting Article II, Section 1. Time of Annual 
Meeting, in its entirety, and substituting the following in 
its place: 

SECTION 1 TIME OF ANNUAL MEETING -The An- 
nual Election shall be held on the First Tuesday of April 
and the Annual Town Meeting shall be held on the last 
Monday of the same month. 

Selectman Emerson explained that it was felt that more 
voter participation would take place on a Tuesday election 
day, rather than as the by-law presently reads on the first 
Saturday. The Finance Committee and Board of Select- 
men recommended the Article. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on the Article, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Chairman of the Planning Board 
John F. McCarthy, moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by deleting the present Zon- 
ing Map and substituting the re-drafted Map proposed by 
the Planning Board, as filed with the Town Clerk entitled 
future land use/proposed Zoning Map Weston & Sampson 
Engineers, Inc. Revised November 11, 1986, and displayed 
at the Special Town Meeting. 

Town Counsel James Harrington moved to amend the 
Article by adding that the proposed zoning map be amend- 
ed on Parkhurst Road as set forth on a plan entitled 
"Parkhurst Road/Jean Avenue, Chelmsford, Mass." 

Town Counsel then explained the purpose of the Arti- 
cle. He stated that there were to be three changes to cor- 
rect the master plan, that was passed at the Annual Town 
Meeting in April. The first change was located on the 
Sheehan property on Pine Hill Road. This is presently listed 
as public land, the town did own it at one time with the 
intentions of building a school on the property, however, 
it has since been sold back to the Sheehan Family and it 
should be listed as RB. The second change was to include 
the RB boundary lines on a portion of land in East 
Chelmsford. The current map does not reflect this zone, 
it was omitted on the map. The third change is the amend- 
ment. An area on Jean Avenue should be a CB Zone this 
acts as buffer to the I A district. Presently the I A district 
extends onto Parkhurst Road, the CB zone was omitted on 
the map. The Moderator asked for the Planning Board's 
recommendation. Thomas Firth, Member of the Planning 
Board gave the board's recommendation. The Planning 
Board held a Public Hearing on December 3, 1986 and 
voted in favor (6-1) of the proposed map changes. They also 
voted in favor (6-1) of the recommended amendment to 
the map. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the Ar- 
ticle. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Blomgren presented a 
brief explanation to the Town Meeting Body. Before ask- 
ing for the Finance Committee's recommendation on this 
Article, the Moderator made a point of order. He explain- 
ed that he did not ask for a complete vote under Article 
3 and asked for reconsideration of Article 3. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 3 The Moderator explained that he 
must ask for a vote on the motion to amend the Article 
to include the Parkhurst Road/Jean Avenue Amendment. 
Motion carried, unanimously. He then asked for a voice 
vote on Article 3 as amended. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

The Moderator returned to Article 4. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 The Moderator asked for the 
Finance Committee's recommendation concerning the Ar- 
ticle. Chairman, Elizabeth Marshall stated that due to the 
last contract approved by the Board of Selectmen, the 
Finance Committee, felt that the requested figures were 
not out of line, and asked the Town Meeting Body to vote 
for the Article. However she stated that the cycle is now 
complete, all future contracts should be negotiated by a 
professional negotiator free from any political pressure, and 
one which will be fair to the union personnel and will be 
fair to the Town as well. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the Article, motion carried, unanimously. The Ar- 
ticle reads as follows: 

Selectman John P. Emerson moved that the Town vote 
to transfer and appropriate from line item 126. County 
Retirement Assessment the amount of seventy-eight thou- 
sand five hundred forty-five dollars ($78,545.00) and 
transfer and appropriate from free cash the sum of fifty- 
nine thousand nine hundred twenty-six dollars ($59,926.00) 
to the following salary line items and expense line items 
in the indicated specific amounts to fund approved wage 
and salary increases and expense allocations in the follow- 
ing departmental accounts: 



DEPARTMENT 

Police 

Police 



LINE ITEM 

72. Salaries 

73. Expenses 
TOTAL 



AMOUNT 

$137,146.00 
$ 1,325.00 
$138,471.00 



UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from 
free cash the amount of two thousand forty-three dollars 
($2,043.00) to the specific amount to fund the approved 
wage and salary increases in the following departmental 
account: 



DEPARTMENT 
Accounting 



LINE ITEM 
1. Salaries 
TOTAL 



AMOUNT 
$2,043.00 
$2,043.00 



Town Counsel explained that this was a Clerical Union 
position that was updated per contract agreement. The 
Finance Committee recommended the figure. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that the Town vote to borrow and/or petition the 
Great and General Court to enact legislation to allow the 
Town to borrow, by bond or note the sum of one million 
nine hundred eight-seven thousand dollars ($1,987,000.00) 
to engage engineers, contractors, attorney's architects, and 
other necessary consultants and/or builders, for the pur- 



113 



pose of preparing, designing and constructing a Senior 
Center and the preparation of all necessary documenta- 
tion thereto, on the property under the control of the Board 
of Selectmen at the North School and being a portion of 
the property taken by the Town of Chelmsford by order 
of taking dated January 17, 1951 and recorded in the Mid- 
dlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 1161, Page 
258, said contracts to be made under the supervision of 
the Board of Selectmen, and moved that the Town vote 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and ex- 
ecute all necessary and proper contracts and agreement 
thereto, contingent upon the town voting to exempt the 
debt associated with this project on a question on the ballot 
at the Annual Town election in the Spring of 1987 elec- 
tion pursuant to Proposition 2 V£ . 

Stephen Wojcik who is the architect for the proposed pro- 
ject, explained the article and answered questions from the 
Town Meeting Body. The Moderator moved to recess the 
meeting for ten minutes, for the purpose of checking the 
auditorium due to several people being able to smell 
natural gas. The meeting recessed at 8:20 p.m. 

The Moderator reconvened the meeting at 8:45 p.m., 
and recognized the presence of a quorum. He stated that 
the Fire Department along with the gas company had done 
a complete check of the situation. They found that the pro- 
blem may have been a result of the local cable company 
truck parked outside the door with it's engine running and 
it had been corrected. 

The Moderator asked if there was any more discussion 
to be heard under Article 6? The Board of Selectmen and 
the Finance Committee were in favor of the Article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, which left the chair in 
doubt. The following tellers came forward to conduct a 
hand count. 



Jocelyn Anthony 
Jack Peters 
Sandy Kilburn 



Gail Klemmer Carol Stack 

Bill Logan Carl Olsson 

Margaret Johnson Ruth Delaney 
Scott Prescott 



The Moderator asked for a show of hands against the 
Article. No hands were counted, the motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Eileen Duffy, Chairman of the 
Park Commission, moved that the Town vote to transfer 
and appropriate from free cash the sum of five thousand 
two hundred dollars ($5,200.00) to be used for the installa- 
tion of a new sixty foot (60') flag pole on the North Com- 
mon in Vinal Square, North Chelmsford, Ma. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommended the Article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Chairman of the Planning Board, 
John F. McCarthy, moved that the Town vote to transfer 
and appropriate from free cash the sum of six thousand 
five hundred dollars ($6,500.00) to prepare a new zoning 
by-law book, and to engage all engineers, attorneys and 



other necessary consultants thereto, and to execute all 
necessary and proper contracts and agrreements, with said 
contracts and agreements to be under the supervision of 
the Planning Board. 

Kim MacKenzie, Member of the Planning Board, read 
a recommendation from the Board, stating that the Plan- 
ning Board unanimously supported the Article. The 
Finance Committee recommended the Article, stating that 
the present book needed to be updated as a result of the 
passage of the master plan at the Annual Town Meeting. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Treasurer/Tax Collector, James 
Doukszewicz, moved that the Town vote to transfer and ap- 
propriate from free cash and the sum of forty thousand 
dollars ($40,000.00) to engage a private accounting firm 
to prepare and audit of the towns financial records for the 
period ending June 20, 1986. 

James Doukszewicz, explained that the State use to do 
the auditing of the Town's books. Now the responsibility 
was mandatory for the town to hire an outside firm to con- 
duct the auditing. The Finance Committee and the Board 
of Selectmen recommended the Article. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Treasurer/Tax Collector, James 
Doukszewicz, moved that the Town vote to transfer and ap- 
propriate from free cash the sum of five thousand dollars 
($5,000.00) for funding the Town of Chelmsfords matching 
share of the new medi-care tax, which is deducted from 
the wages earned by newly hired employees after March 
1, 1986. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman John P. Emerson Jr., 
moved that this Article be dismissed. He said that it was 
to purchase a sander for the Highway Department. How- 
ever, the Article never went before the Capital Planning 
Committee, therefore it could not be acted upon. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 A discussion took place. Pennryn 
Fitts of the Personnel Board explained that this was the 
3.5% increase due to those employees who came under the 
jurisdiction of the Personnel Board as a result of the union 
employees settlement. Paul McCarthy, of the Board of 
Health, moved to amend the Article by increasing the total 
by $2,872.16. This is the amount needed to include the 
employees of the Board of Health. He stated that these 
employees do not come under the Personnel Board, or any 
union, and that they should receive the same increase. More 
discussion took place. The Finance Committee did not 
recommend the motion to amend. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to amend. Which left the 
chair in doubt. He then asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried to amend. He then asked for a voice vote on 



114 



the main motion as amended, motion carried, unanimous- 
ly. The article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Personnel Board, Alan Murphy, mov- 
ed that the town vote to transfer and appropriate from Free 
Cash the sum of fifty thousand seven hundred and seventy- 
nine dollars and sixteen cents ($50,779.16) to the follow- 
ing salary line items and expense line items in the indicated 
specific amounts to fund approved wage and salary in- 
creases and expense allocations in the following departmen- 
tal accounts: 





LINE 




DEPARTMENT 


ITEM 


AMOUNT 


Accounting 


1. 


1,938.00 


Assessors 


7. 


905.00 


Cemetery 


12. 


1,037.00 


Council on Aging/Town Aide 


19. 


2,126.00 


Highway 


41. 


4,252.00 


Inspection 


51. 


3,576.00 


Library 


59. 


11,360.00 


Park 


66. 


1,037.00 


Planning Board 


70. 


3,630.00 


Police 


72. 


10,978.00 


Selectmen 


91. 


2,588.00 


Town Clerk 


102. 


724.00 


Town Engineering 


105. 


2,085.00 


Treasurer/Collector 


109. 


761.00 


Veterans Benefits 


118. 


910.00 


Board of Health 




2,872.16 




TOTAL 


50,779.16 



for two non-voters to speak about the article, they were At- 
torney Hall, and Architect Weinmayr. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote, motion carried. Attorney Hall explained 
that the area in question was the 15.1 acre site on the pre- 
sent Chelmsford Drive-in Theater. The area was presently 
zoned RB District (Residential) and make it an RM District 
(Multiple Family), and build an 108-unit condominium 
complex. Architect Weinmayr did a presentation to the 
Town Meeting Body explaining the proposed project in 
detail. A number of residents who lived in the area spoke 
both against and in favor of the proposal. A discussion took 
place. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, which left the 
chair in doubt. He asked for a show of hands, motion 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Library Trustee, Susan Cantin, 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from 
free cash the sum of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000.00) 
for a feasibility study of parcels of land within the town 
for purposes of constructing or expanding existing Public 
Library facilities, and for the preparation of preliminary 
architectural designs and drawings in connection therewith. 

Susan Cantin explained the Article. The Finance Com- 
mittee supported the Article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the Article. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator moved to adjourn the meeting seeing 
that there was no need for further business. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 10:00 p.m. 



UNDER ARTICLE 13 Gary Marchand, Petitioner of the 
Article, asked for permission from the Town Meeting Body 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



115 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

Dennis E. McHugh 
(Term Expires 1987) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
(Term Expires 1987) 

Board of Selectmen 

Paul C. Hart Term Expired 1986 

Roger A. Blomgren Term Expires 1987 

Bonita A. Towle Term Expires 1988 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1988 

Dennis A. Ready Term Expires 1989 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. Term Expires 1989 

Treasurer & Tax Collector 

James R. Doukszewicz Term Expires 1987 

Board of Assessors 

Diane M. Phillips, (Appt) Unexpired Term Expires 1987 

James H. McBride Term Expires 1988 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1989 

Janet Lombard Deceased May 28, 1986 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Charlotte P. DeWolf Term Expires 1987 

Everett V. Olsen Term Expires 1988 

Gerald L. Hardy Term Expires 1989 

Housing Authority 

Claude A. Harvey Term Expires 1987 

Robert L. Hughes Term Expires 1988 

Pamela Turnbull Term Expires 1988 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1990 

William P. Keohane Term Expires 1991 

Board of Health 

Peter Dulchinos Term Expires 1987 

Paul E. McCarthy Term Expires 1988 

Paul J. Canniff Term Expires 1989 

Park Commissioners 

Mary P. Bennett Term Expires 1987 

Robert L. Wetmore Term Expires 1988 

Eileen Duffy Term Expires 1989 



Planning Board 

Eugene E. Gilet Term Expires 1987 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Term Expires 1987 

Kim J. MacKenzie (Appt) Unexpired Term Expires 1987 

Charles A. Parlee Term Expires 1988 

Rosalind M. Boyle Term Expires 1988 

Ann McCarthy Term Expires 1989 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. Resigned 

School Committee 

Carol C. Cleven Term Expires 1987 

Samuel Poulten Term Expires 1987 

Nicholas G. Gavriel Term Expires 1988 

Carl A. Olsson Term Expires 1989 

James Brough Term Expires 1989 

Sewer Commissioners 

Jean R. Organ Term Expires 1987 

Barry B. Balan Term Expires 1988 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1989 

Library Trustees 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy Term Expires 1987 

D. Lorraine Lambert Term Expires 1987 

Susan G. Cantin Term Expires 1988 

Mark W. Gauthier Term Expires 1988 

Janet B. Hendl Term Expires 1989 

Brenda M. McDermott Term Expires 1989 

Constable 

William E. Spence Term Expires 1989 

Tree Warden 

Frank Wojtas Term Expires 1987 

Varney Playground Commissioners 
(Elected at Town Meeting) 

Harry J. Ayotte Term Expires 1987 

Bernard Battle .Term Expires 1988 

Norbert J. McHale Term Expired 1989 

Finance Committee 
(Appointed by Moderator) 

Cheryl A. Boss Term Expires 1987 

Dwight M. Hayward Term Expires 1987 

George A. Nelson Term Expires 1987 

Myra Silver Term Expires 1988 

Elizabeth Marshall Term Expires 1988 

Donald Elias Term Expires 1989 

Peter V. Lawlor Term Expires 1989 

David McLachlan Resigned 

George Ripsom Resigned 



116 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Ruth K. Delaney, M.A.A., Chairman 

Diane M. Phillips, M.A.A. James H. McBride 

Nancy L. Maher, Assistant to the Assessors 

The Assessors office continues its busy schedule as the 
increase in sales and permit activity continues. There were 
approximately 1000 permits this year. Condominiums, 
rather than new homes were responsible for most of our 
new building activity. Commercial and industrial building 
is on a decline, approximately 32% standing vacant. 

This year the Board of Selectmen voted to classify pro- 
perty in Chelmsford, (residential at one rate $14.66, com- 
mercial, industrial and personal property at a higher rate 
$15.64). 

The triennial certification of new values or real estate 
and personal property was completed and bills were sent 
out in the spring of 1986. We have started our three year 
cycle of interior inspections as required by the Department 
of Revenue. This will be an ongoing process. Next year we 
will again be getting ready for fiscal 1989 recertification. 
All values have to be at full and fair cash value as of January 
1, 1988. 

We are looking forward to having our own in-house com- 
puter. This will expedite the daily work load and also assist 
the public by giving them easier access to their records. 

This paragraph is dedicated to Assessor Janet Lombard 
who passed away May 29, 1986. Janet had been an Assessor 
since 1974. She was well respected in her profession 
throughout the state. She served as president of the Mid- 
dlesex County Assessors Association in 1982-1983. We will 
all miss Jan. 

The Assessors would like to thank the office staff for their 
hard work during a trying time— Ass't. to the Assessors, 
Nancy Maher, Principal Clerks, Evelyn Philbrook, Marie 
Ronan and Senior Clerk, Elaine McBride. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Diane M. Phillips 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health Members 
Chairman Peter Dulchinos 

Vice Chairman Paul McCarthy 

Clerk Dr. Paul Canniff 

Health Department Personnel 



Director of Public Health 
Health Inspector/ Asst. 
Departmental Asst. 
Town Nurse 
Town Physician 



Richard J. Day 

John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Diana L. Wright 

Judith Dunigan 

Michael Dean, M.D. 



Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1986 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Pro- 
gram continued its effort to clean up our waterways. The 
Board of Health has continued to run its dye testing and 
water sampling program and positive results are being seen. 
Numerous tests have been performed by the Board of 
Health along with the issuance of one-hundred seventy sep- 
tic system permits (repair) and eight-seven septic system 
permits (new) with an increasing percentage of commer- 
cial, industrial and condominium buildings. 

Administration and Managment 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 

Percolation Tests — 55 $ 1,375 

Deep Tests-417 10,425 

Sewage Repair Permits — 170 2,615 

Sewage Construction Permits — 87 4,536 

Miscellaneous License and Fees 6,551 

Complaint and Inspectional Services 

During 1986 three inspections were made at day care 
centers; twenty-six inspections made for Chapter II, Hous- 
ing; ten school inspections; complaints received and check- 
ed, two-hundred sixty-six; Camp Paul inspections, six; 
bathing beaches, twenty-four inspections; International 
Certificates of Vaccination, four; restaurant and retail food 
store inspections, one-hundred four establishments in town. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater 

The Board of Health, because of new local and state laws 
and public awareness in the areas of hazardous waste 
disposal, had been called upon to coordinate all phases of 
hazardous waste activities. 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was reap- 
pointed by the Board of Selectmen as the town's Hazar- 
dous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator to 
enforce the new "Right -to -Know" law for this town. The 
position encompasses actions between the State, Federal 
agencies, business community and the general public. 

Household Hazardous Waste Day 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewaters has open- 
ed up a whole new area to be monitored. A number of in- 
cidents have required a cooperative effort between the town 
and DEQE officials. It is the goal of the Board of Health, 
along with other town departments, to keep abreast of all 
current changes and updates in the handling and disposal 
of all toxic wastes and to supersede any State and Federal 
standards where it would best serve to protect this com- 
munity and its precious water supplies. With this in mind, 
the Board of Health has held two Household Hazardous 
Waste Days, on May 3, 1986 and November 1, 1986. They 
were a great success, removing 35 barrels of Hazardous 
Waste from the town. 

No Smoking Regulations In Restaurants 

On September 23, 1986 the Board of Health put into 
effect new regulations establishing designated smoking and 
non-smoking areas in all restaurants in town with a seating 
capacity of forty or more. This new program will be ad- 
dressing the interior air quality issues which impact our 
health and well being. 



117 



Communicable Disease Program 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health man- 
dates that an epidemiological investigation be undertaken 
on approximately forty-three communicable diseases. 
When a communicable disease is reported to the Health 
Department by a physician or hospital, the nurse contacts 
the person involved to ascertain if a probable source of the 
infection can be determined. Concerns in relation to com- 
municability of the disease are discussed and, as is the case 
in some communicable diseases, food handlers or family 
members are removed from their jobs during the period 
of communicability. The follow-up report is submitted to 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Reports 
on the following diseases were completed during 1986: 

Hepatitis A 2 

Hepatitis B 5 

Hepatisis Non-A, Non-B 1 

Salmonella 30 

Toxic Shock Syndrome 1 

Campylobacter Enteritis 13 

Giardiasis 13 

Viral Meningitis 3 

Active Tuberculosis 1 

Tuberculosis Control 30 
Program* 

•Referrals received from the Lowell Chest Clinic and 
Middlesex Community Hospital TB Clinic. 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and those 
persons whose employment require certification of freedom 
from that disease is another responsibility of the Town 
Nurse. One-hundred thirty-two mantoux (TB) tests were 
given to town residents for pre-employment and to 
household contacts of active cases in compliance with the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health regulations. 
Persons with positive test results are referred to the Lowell 
Chest Clinic for follow-up. Home visits and telephone calls 
are made to families of active and some inactive tuber- 
culosis cases on a periodic basis to insure understanding 
of the illness and that adequate medical follow-up is achiev- 
ed. Numerous medical records are kept and updated on 
residents who have a positive (TB) mantoux test and are 
receiving medication prophylactically and being followed 
radiologically at the Lowell Chest Clinic. 

AIDS and Venereal Disease are reported by the physi- 
cian directly to the State Department of Public Health to 
maintain patient confidentiality. 

Maternal/Child Health — High Risk Infant Identifica- 
tion Program 

Telephone correspondence is made to the parents of 
premature or High Risk Infants. Home visits are made by 
the nurse when deemed necessary to assist the mother 



and/or assess the development of the premature infant. 
Other home visits are made by physician referral. These 
follow-ups are not only made for health supervision, but 
for education and referrals when indicated. Five High Risk 
Infants were reported in 1986. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health and Council on Aging sponsored 
two flu clinics this year. The vaccine was offered to the 
elderly and all others with chronic illness regardless of age, 
as recommended by the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health. Eighty-three persons were immunized with 
pneumonia vaccine and eight-hundred twenty-five persons 
were immunized with flu vaccine at clinics. An additional 
one-hundred ninety doses were given to nursing homes, 
forty-four doses to school nurses for staff and twenty-eight 
home visits were made to handicapped or house-bound 
residents. A total of one thousand eight-seven doses of flu 
vaccine were administered in town, provided free by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The Board 
of Health purchased Monovalent vaccine for use against 
the single/strain of Taiwan Flu and fourteen doses were ad- 
ministered. 

Several immunizations were administered to update 
students records in compliance with the Massachusetts 
School Immunization Laws. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the first 
Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the Board 
of Health, Town Offices. 

Diabetic Screening Program 

The Health Department has an Ames Glucometer for 
the purpose of conducting blood sugar screenings. The pro- 
cedure takes a short time, involves a small sample of blood 
by finger prick method, and can be done either fasting or 
two hours after meals. Residents may call the Health 
Department office and make an appointment with the 



Community Health 

The town's third health fair was held in the spring and 
approximately 300-400 residents participated in the twelve 
free screenings. In addition, there were over thirty exhibits 
staffed by professionals from various health related fields. 
They were available for consultation and to provide 
resource material. This year, in lieu of a health fair, we 
will have a blood cholesterol screening test available to any 
resident. This will be offered three different times during 
the year for a nominal fee. Dates will be announced in the 
newspaper several weeks prior to the screening. 



118 



CHELMSFORD HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority continues to be ac- 
tive in applying for additional housing units. The Hous- 
ing Authority in April 1986 submitted to the Executive 
Office of Communities and Development a reapplication 
for 16 family and 48 elderly units. The units are to be 
located on five (5) different sites. All the elderly units (48) 
will be constructed on the North School site. The family 
units are to be on sites as follows: two duplexes (4 units) 
will be on the North School property; four (4) units at the 
Highland School; four (4) units at the old North Town Hall 
and four (4) units at the Louise Bishop Center. In July 1986 
we were awarded $3,500,000 to fund this development. Ar- 
chitect, MGIA, has been hired to start schematic designs 
on the property in the ongoing year. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs at pre- 
sent now provide a total of two hundred and thirty-four 
units of low income housing; twenty-one handicapped, 
seventy family and one hundred and forty-three elderly 
units. Five of the Chelmsford Housing Authority programs 
are funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
through the Executive Office of Communities and Develop- 
ment under Chapter 667; Chelmsford Arms completed in 
1974, fifty-six regular units and eight handicapped units; 
The Community Residence purchased in 1974 for the mild- 
ly to moderate retarded, eight units; six condominiums in 
Pickwick Estates were purchased in 1984, McFarlin Manor 
completed in 1981; forty-three regular units, three han- 
dicapped units, one four-bedroom congregate unit which 
serves the "semi -independent elderly." Under Chapter 707, 
the Chelmsford Housing Authority "scattered site" pro- 
gram which started in 1974, there are twenty-eight units 
under lease in the private market. The Section 8 Existing 
Housing Program presently has fifty-eight units under lease 
and twenty-five units leased under the Section 8 Voucher 
Program. The Chelmsford Housing Authority most recent 
financial statement lists assets at $3,927,419.42, liabilities 
at $3,927,419.42 for all developments. The Chelmsford 
Housing Authority Board of Commissioners attended a 
state sponsored training course at Tufts University in 
September 1986. All developments are formally inspected 
every six months by staff and once a year by members of 
the Authority. The Authority is especially grateful to those 
organizations which express special concern for the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority residents and to the 
Chelmsford Garden Clubs for their assistance in the 
beautification of the developments every year. 

Members of the staff include Mary E. Royce, Executive 
Director, Helen Cantara, Senior Clerk, Robert Trainor, 
full time maintenance laborer, and Richard O'Neil, part- 
time maintenance laborer. Regular meetings are held at 
McFarlin Manor, 10 Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m. on the first 
Tuesday each month. The annual meeting is the first Tues- 
day in May. All meetings are opened to the public. The 



Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commissioners 
would like to thank the residents of Chelmsford and Town 
Officials for their continued support and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman 

Robert L. Hughes, Vice Chairman 

William P. Keohane, Treasurer 

Pamela Turnbull, Assistant Treasurer 

Claude A. Harvey, Member 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 

Serving the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, 
Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend and Westford. 



DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Irene Machemer, Chairman 
David Snow, Vice-Chairman 
Thomas Carey, Secretary 
Jane Barry 
William Buxton 
Stratos Dukakis 
Augustine Kish 
Robert Manning 
Charlotte Scott 
Cecile Stefanski 



ALTERNATES 



Harvey Atkins, Jr. 
Howard Burns 
Kevin Finnegan 
Edward Mitchell 
L. Peter Noddin 
Jordan Waugh 
Ronald Wetmore 



Townsend 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Groton 

Pepperell 

Chelmsford 

Littleton 

Shirley 

Westford 

Westford 



Littleton 

Pepperell 

Westford 

Townsend 

Shirley 

Groton 

Chelmsford 



ADMINISTRATION 



Bernholdt Nystrom 
Charles Valera 
David McLaughlin 
Paul Royte 
Sandra Harvey Weigle 



Superintendent-Director 

Assistant Director/ Principal 

Assistant Director/Vocational 

Guidance Director 

Coordinator of 

Special Education 



Thomas Eng 




Dean of Students 


Nashoba Valley Technical High 


School's enrollment as 


of October 1, 1986 was as 


follows: 




Chelmsford 




191 


Groton 




66 


Littleton 




51 


Pepperell 




92 


Shirley 




76 


Townsend 




57 


Westford 




136 


Tuitioned 




19 



Total 



688 



119 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited by 
the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. 
and provides its students with on-the-job training, saleable 
skills, co-op program, high school diploma, trade cer- 
tificate and an opportunity for further education and job 
placement. 

Over the past decade, the record of employment for our 
graduates has averaged approximately 95%. Each year 
qualified seniors may elect to take advantage of our Co- 
op Training Program which allows senior students to work 
in industry during their shop weeks and receive valuable 
training in their chosen fields as well as a salary. 

The following programs are offered at Nashoba Tech: 

Technical Programs 



Auto Body 

Automotive 

Carpentry 

Culinary Arts and Baking 

Data Processing 
Drafting 
Electrical 
Electronics 



Horticulture/ Landscaping 

Machine 

Medical Occupations 

Metal Fabrication 

and Welding 

Painting and Decorating 

Plumbing and Heating 

Printing 



Academic Programs 

English Geometry 

Social Studies Trigonometry 

U.S. History Advanced Mathematics 

Consumer Education Biology 

General Mathematics Physics 

Algebra Chemistry 

How to Start Your Own Business 

In addition to the technical and academic programs, 
a full Inter-Scholastic Athletic Program is offered to the 
students. 

ADULT EDUCATION 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult Educa- 
tion Program is open to anyone of high school age or over. 
Participants from all communities are welcome to par- 
ticipate in the many diversified courses which are offered 
during both the fall and spring semesters. This year 717 
students enrolled in our Adult Education Program. 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

The Park Commissioners re-appointed Donald Gray, 
Park Superintendent and Robert Wetmore, Chairman. 

A new 1987 Dodge truck was purchased by the 
Department. 

Money was appropriated at the Special Town Meeting 
for a new 60' fibreglass flagpole for the North Common. 



Maintenance continued on the Park and Recreation 
areas. 

We thank all Town Departments, Garden Clubs and 
townspeople for their continued cooperation and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert W. Wetmore, Chairman 
Eileen M. Duffy 
Mary P. Bennett 

Donald P. Gray, Superintendent 



PLANNING BOARD 

John F. McCarthy, Chairman 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Rosalind M. Boyle, Clerk 

Ann H. McCarthy 

Eugene E. Gilet 

Charles A. Parlee 

Kim J. MacKenzie 

Administrative Assistant, Kris Gleason 

The Chelmsford Planning Board began the year by 
reorganizing the Board and appointed Mr. John F McCar- 
thy as Chairman, Mr. Thomas E. Firth, Jr. as Vice Chair- 
man and Mrs. Rosalind M. Boyle as Clerk. Mr. Eugene 
Gilet is the representative to the Northern Middlesex Area 
Commission. Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. , who had served as 
a member on the Planning Board for 11 years, was elected 
to the Board of Selectmen and resigned his seat on this 
Board. The seat was filled by the Planning Board in con- 
junction with the Board of Selectmen by Kim J. MacKenzie. 

This past year 6 residential subdivisions were approved. 
They were located in the following areas: 5-lots off Old 
Westford Rd. , 2-lots off Mill Rd. , Mot off Dunstable Rd. , 
2-lots off Charles Way, 3-lots off Fenwick Rd. and 2-lots 
off Hall Road for a total of 15 -lots. 

14 Site plans were approved in 1986. Three of these were 
additions to existing buildings. They included Edward 
Talbot Insurance Agency (Chelmsford St.), Katz Carpet 
(180 Middlesex St.), Princeton Lounge (Princeton St.) 

In May of 1986 at the Special Town Meeting within the 
Annual Town Meeting, the Master Plan was accepted by 
the Town. The overall goal of this plan is to preserve and 
enhance the quality of life in Chelmsford. 

One of the most significant changes in the zoning by- 
law as a result of the Master Plan is the addition of the 
Aquifer Protection District. This encompasses a 1,200 foot 
radius around the well sites and the drainage area which 
flows toward the well. One benefit of this addition to the 
by-law is a further safeguard for the quality of drinking 
water in Chelmsford for both now and in the future. 

Among areas of concern to the Planning Board are the 
issues of traffic and drainage problems. The Board has 



120 



worked continuously to ensure that traffic problems are 
minimized. The Route 129 improvements that are to be 
continued are the result of the town Boards working 
together with the developers and engineers to improve the 
situation. Traffic studies are required to be submitted with 
each proposal for a major business complex submitted to 
the Planning Board. 

In many instances residents who have drainage problems 
discuss the same with the Board and the Board in turn tries 
to help find a solution for both the benefit of the resident 
and the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John F. McCarthy, Chairman 

CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees 

Susan B. Cantin, Chairperson 
Lorraine Lambert, Vice -Chairperson 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 
Brenda McDermott, Secretary 
Mark Gauthier 
Janet Hendl 

Collections and Circulations: Efforts by all departments 
in the Library are resulting in increased borrowing of 
materials by our patrons — the Circulation Department is 
coordinating book displays to market what the Library 
owns; special emphasis on selection of quality storytime 
books for children has created a dramatic increase in their 
use; additional state aid has been used to expand the 
Reference collection; the Technical Services staff process- 
ed about 75 more items per month than last year. 

Programs: The Carriage House, MacKay Branch, and 
Children's House sponsored a wonderful series of programs 
in 1986. Library patrons received advice from a chiroprac- 
tor, listened to book reviews, were fascinated by storytellers, 
enjoyed films of American short stories, played Scrabble, 
planned vegetable gardens, participated in book discus- 
sions, discovered how to manage their time and energy 
AND how to fill out college applications. Of course, all 
of these programs were free! 

Cooperative efforts: The Library carried on its joint 
programming with the Chelmsford Art Society exhibits and 
the Senior Citizen mid-day forums; and Friends of the 
Library sponsored a reading readiness series, as well as a 
Statute of Liberty photo exhibit. Continuation of our rela- 
tionship with the school libraries resulted in the creation 
of SAPLOC (School and Public Libraries of Chelmsford), 
an organization for the promotion of library services in the 
community. Our first effort was a 2001 essay contest, kick- 



ed off during National Library week and partially funded 
by Apollo Computer. Ongoing projects include "Cover 
Stories," a monthly Cable 43 production of library- related 
programming. Thanks go to Matt Scott of Cable 43 and 
Patt Moser, Director of Instructional Media, for their 
creativity and organization. A state-funded grant for 
storytelling materials and workshops will also give staff of 
both public and school libraries new skills. The Chelmsford 
Cultural Council enabled the Children's Department to 
provide summer vacation programming for our younger 
patrons, and brought a science fiction author to lecture 
here during National Library Week. The Chelmsford 
Rotary Club funded furniture and videocassette purchases 
for the Children's Department. 

Public services: Good service to our patrons is always 
a priority. Hours of service at the Children's House and 
at MacKay Branch have been increased; we're testing a 
public access terminal in the Adams Reference Room; the 
Young Adult collection is being re-vitalized; MacKay story 
hours have been doubled; interlibrary loans have more 
than doubled as use of the data base for the Merrimack 
Valley Library Consortium has grown; renewing of library 
materials by telephone has been implemented; a commuter 
cassette club brings books and music on tape to daily 
travelers; worn but valuable books are now being mended 
or rebound in a new program for keeping the collections 
in the best condition possible for our patrons. 

Personnel: Changes included the retirement of Molly 
McCarthy of the Children's Department and Barbara 
Moore in Technical Services; Kathleen Arsenault and 
Judith Clough joined the staff of the Children's Depart- 
ment; Nancy Kiernan replaced Claire Frassica at MacKay 
Branch and Kathy Cryan-Hicks replaced Joe Walsh in 
Reference. Responsibility for maintenance of grounds and 
buildings was taken over by Jake Reslow. The position of 
Assistant Director was reinstated in September and San- 
dra Yensen is a welcome addition. Janet Hendl and Bren- 
da McDermott were re-elected to the Board of Trustees. 

Directions: The major project of 1986 was the comple- 
tion of a community analysis and library evaluation. Com- 
piled by Library staff and volunteers, with Friends' funding 
for printing costs, the study gathered much information 
from patrons, staff, community officials and non-users of 
the Library as well. Top priority for the future (based on 
the study's findings) is to work on a new or expanded cen- 
tral library facility. The December 8 Special Town Meeting 
voted $50,000 for a site feasibility study for the central 
library, and at year's end, plans for a Building Commit- 
tee were being formed. Improvement in the physical plant 
at both the Center and MacKay is an on-going project; 
MacKay's exterior and interior were re-painted in 1986, 
and more work needs to be done on the roof and back wall. 
Repair to roofs, plastering and chimneys also are needed 
for Library buildings. 

Our major priority for 1987 is to improve the collections 
at the libraries. All of the staff is in some way involved in 
evaluation of the materials owned by the Library — from 
checking on their currency, to examining their physical 



121 



condition with an eye to possible re-binding, to identify- 
ing subject areas which need attention for new purchases. 

1987 will build on the progress made in 1986 for the 
improvement of library service and facilities; gratitude for 
their role in the progress to date goes to the Trustees, staff, 
friends and patrons of the Library. 

Statistical Report 

Monies deposited with the 

Town Treasurer $13,466 fines & lost books 

15,587 state aid 
9,038 additional state aid 
(used by Library for 
reference enhance- 





ment) 


Circulation 


225,709 


Staff (full-time) 


12 


(part-time) 


9.75 (FTE's) 


pages 


1.5 (FTE's) 



Departments: 

Technical Services: Nancy Jo Brown 
Circulation: Linda Robinson 
Children's: Cheryl Zani 
Reference: Priscilla Vaughn 
Community Services: Judy Buswick 
MacKay Branch: Rona Call 
Maintenance/custodial: John Reslow 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ellen Rauch 
Director 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



Richard F. Burtt, Jr. 



Judith A. Olsson 
Chairman 



Janet F Bonica 



PRECINCT 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 



REGISTERED 
VOTERS 

1,631 
1,071 
2,038 
642 
2,093 
1,477 
1,240 
1,209 
1,064 
1,939 
1,055 
1,670 



ENROLLED VOTERS 



DEMOCRATIC 

508 
431 
616 
299 
615 
535 
435 
368 
371 
575 
399 
546 



REPUBLICAN 

369 
164 
291 
78 
361 
268 
176 
264 
131 
346 
187 
254 



UNENROLLED 
VOTERS 

754 

476 
1,131 

265 
1,117 

674 

629 

577 

562 
1,018 

469 

870 



TOTALS 



17,129 



5,698 



2,889 



8,542 



122 



CHELMSFORD SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




James Brough, Chairman 
Samuel Poulten, Vice Chairman 
Carl A . Olsson, Secretary 

Andrew Turner, Student Member 



Carol C. Cleven 
Nicholas G. Gavriel 



123 



THE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1986 



COMPARATIVE DATE 





Teaching Positions 


Administrative 




Student 


(including) 


(Bldg. & Central) 


Other 


Enrollment 


Specialists) 


Office) 


Personnel 


7,477 


513 


39 


222 


6,980 


390 


31 


212 


6,512 


371 


30 


207 


6,103 


371 


29 


207 


5,839 


356 


28 


206 


5,652 


348 


25 


206 


5,473 


342 


26 


206 


5,240 


339 


26 


197 



Years 

1980-81 
1981-82 
1982-83 
1983-84 
1984-85 
1985-86 
1986-87 
1987-88 proj. 



The Annual Report for 1986 is an indication of the many 
varied accomplishments for the Chelmsford Public Schools. 
The accomplishments were diverse, some large and some 
small, some just beginning steps on large projects. But all 
were exciting and attest to the vitality of the school system. 

It is becoming increasingly apparent that the concerns 
of the last few years continue to affect our schools and will 
undoubtedly continue into the foreseeable future. These 
concerns can be identified as declining enrollment especial- 
ly at the secondary level, higher education standards, 
higher salary rates, a possible teacher shortage, and ad- 
justing the housing needs of a shrinking school enrollment. 
The most readily discernible effects of these concerns is the 
annual school budget and compliance with Proposition 
2i/ 2 . 

The School Department is now in the process of develop- 
ing a six year plan to address the above mentioned con- 
cerns. Committees have been organized to investigate and 
make recommendations in the following areas: 

1. Philosophy & Objectives 

2. Educational Programs 

3 . Personnel 

4. Facilities/Organization Structure 

5. Ancillary Support Services 

6. Student Services 

7. Community Education 

None of the School Committee's responsibilities is more 
important than maintaining the quality of the curriculum 
and instructional programs. With this concept in mind, 
the Committee reorganized the administrative structure for 
overseeing curriculum development and implementation. 
The two Assistant Superintendents were assigned the overall 
responsibility of curriculum supervision. Two new positions 
were created to carry out the task of organizing content 



Budget 

15,496,000 
14,543,772 
15,050,709 
15,798,307 
16,716,207 
17,896,684 
18,944,726 



at each grade level so that it has greatest effect in terms of 
meeting fundamental goals. 

Throughout the year, members of the professional staff 
meet with the Director of Humanities or the Director of 
Sciences to evaluate present curricula, to consider trends, 
to evaluate test results, and to suggest new, appropriate 
areas for action. The improvements in the instructional 
programs can be attributed to the school system's efforts 
during 1986 to organize the curriculum more effectively, 
to analyze individual student's needs and learning styles, 
to utilize instructional materials appropriately and to work 
in closer understanding and cooperation with parents. 

Chapter 188, the new Educational Reform Bill passed 
in 1985, is now a reality. 

The School Improvement Councils were organized and 
met to determine how the $10 per pupil, grades K-6, should 
be utilized. A number of exciting ideas and projects emerg- 
ed from the councils to improve the quality of education 
at the school building level by expanding services to 
students, increasing community and parent involvement 
and developing business and education partnerships. 

The curriculum assessment was completed in grades 3, 
7, and 11. This test is intended to improve curriculum and 
instruction in the public schools of Massachusetts. More 
importantly, this test offers a rich source of information 
to support local efforts to plan for the improvement of 
school programs, instruction and services. The assessment 
tests covered the following curriculum areas: 

Reading 

Mathematics 

Sciences 

In all areas, the students in the Chelmsford Public 
Schools scored higher than the state average and the 
average of comparative communities. 

Chapter 188 also provided for competitive Horace Mann 
Grants. This program was designed to increase teacher in- 
itiative and creativity, and to improve the use of valuable 



124 



teaching resources. In general, the program will provide 
opportunities for teachers to take on expanded respon- 
sibilities while at the same time being appropriately com- 
pensated and recognized for their initiative. Twenty- two 
teachers were selected by a committee composed of three 
teachers and three administrators to share the $43,000 
grant from the state. 

The following reports written by school personnel will 
provide you with a sampling of the accomplishments of our 
young people as well as better understanding of the learn- 
ing environment and practical experiences present in our 
schools today. 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

1986 was a year of many accomplishments and satisfy- 
ing achievements at Chelmsford High School. The Calculus 
Team was initiated, and it experienced immediate success 
by winning the New England Championship. The Math 
Team was likewise successful as it once again won the Mer- 
rimack Valley Championships. 

The Music Department presented their spirited hit ver- 
sion of the musical Hello Dolly in the spring, and the 
Drama Club presented the very entertaining M.A.S.H. in 
the fall. Many students won individual academic honors 
including several Globe Scholastic Art Awards. 

One of the most successful and growing activities has 
been the Foreign Exchange Club, which this year, added 
exchanges with Spain and Germany to go along with 
popular exchanges with Great Britain, France, and Italy. 
The American Field Service Club hosted a student from 
Bolivia for the school year and sent students to Brazil and 
Thailand for the year. Chelmsford students spent the sum- 
mer abroad in Turkey, Colombia, Finland, Costa Rica, 
Honduras, and Paraguay. 

Athletically, Chelmsford High School had an outstan- 
ding year as it was named the winner of the Dalton Trophy, 
symbolic of athletic excellence, for the fourth consecutive 
year. Making a major contribution to this achievement was 
the girls' Volleyball Team which, for two years in a row, 
finished the season undefeated and repeated as State 
Champions. Equally outstanding were the achievements 
of the Wrestling Team which repeated as State Champions 
and added the New England Championship. League 
championships were added by the boys' and girls' swim 
teams, boys' and girls' cross country teams, the ice hockey 
team, boys' winter and spring track teams, boys' tennis 
team and the girls' field hockey team. 

Chelmsford High School's multi-faceted personality con- 
tinued to be shown through another successful student 
blood drive resulting in over 200 pints donated, as well as 
through numerous other community-oriented projects, 
especially at Thanksgiving and Christmas. 

In one sense, 1986 can be recorded as a year of business 



as usual at Chelmsford High School as the expected 
triumphs of activities and teams and the excellence of the 
educational program took another step forward. 



FROM THE DIRECTORS OF 
HUMANITIES AND SCIENCE 

Two directors positions were established in the school 
system, effective July 1, 1986. The responsibilities of these 
positions are curriculum and staff. The responsibility for 
curriculum has been divided between the two positions; 
namely, humanities and sciences. 

The director of humanities is responsible for the follow- 
ing areas; kindergarten through grade twelve; language 
arts, reading, social studies, foreign language, art, music 
and testing programs for the town. 

The director of Science is responsible for the following 
areas; kindergarten through grade twelve; mathematics, 
sciences, computer science, business education, health 
education, physical education, industrial arts, home 
economics and in-service programs for the town. 

The directors work in close harmony with each other 
and the assistant superintendents for personnel/curriculum 
and business/curriculum. They also oversee and work 
closely with the department heads for the various cur- 
riculum areas at the middle schools and high school as well 
as those department heads who cover curriculum, 
Kindergarten through grade twelve. 

The elementary grades, one through three, have adopted 
three new reading basal systems, which are: D.C. Heath, 
Scribner and Houghton Mifflin. The materials were 
selected over many other companies by a committee made 
up of teachers, grades kindergarten through six, ad- 
ministrators, and Dr. Anne M. McParland from the Col- 
lege of Education, University of Lowell. The committee 
concluded that these materials best met the needs of our 
students. 

Some students in our Kindergartens have begun the pro- 
cess of learning to read. Testing was done on those children 
who were reading and thought to be ready to read, and 
materials were provided to begin the scope and sequence 
for reading. 

All students grades 1-6 are using Harcourt Brace 
Jovanovich Spelling and Language Arts books for consisten- 
cy and continuity in the Language Arts program. Process 
writing workshops were attended at the University of Mass- 
achusetts at Amherst by a group of teachers, English 
Department Head, Steve Meidell and Richard Hentz, Prin- 
cipal at the South Row School. As a direct rsult of this ter- 
rific workshop, process writing is being done from 
Kindergarten through grade twelve. 

Social Studies programs have been revised in grades one 
through five. Grade four students are presently studying 
the state of Massachusetts and the seven regions of the 



125 



United States. The students in grade four will be visiting 
the State House as part of their study of their home state. 

Grade five students begin studying the history of the 
United States with the Explorers, and follow through the 
founding of the country. New text books for grades four 
and five were purchased to implement these programs. 

Chapter 188 has accounted for many changes and im- 
plication for the humanities curriculum area. Horace 
Mann grants have been established to aid in the develop- 
ment of programs to enrich or augment curriculum. One 
of the programs is the development of a social studies cur- 
riculum for grade three on the town of Chelmsford. 

Assessment Testing at grades 3, 7 and 11, also part of 
Chapter 188, provided information concerning our students' 
achievements in relation to other like communities, as well 
as the state as a whole. While students' scores in Chelmsford 
were encouraging, some aspects such as parents reading 
to children were not as positive as we would have desired. 
A program in our schools called sustained silent reading 
has been expanded to include all elementary and the mid- 
dle schools. Children will be reading silently for fifteen or 
twenty minutes twice a week in our schools. 

This fall, Chelmsford introduced a new achievement 
testing program, at grades 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. The 
Metropolitan Achievement Test was used to measure the 
students' progress and curriculum. Parents received com- 
prehensive results of their childrens' progress in December. 

Basic Skills Testing mandated by Chapter 188 also took 
place this fall in grades 3, 6 and 9. The areas tested were 
reading, writing and mathematics. We are awaiting the 
results which are expected in early 1987. 

It has been an exciting year for education in the Com- 
monwealth and in the town of Chelmsford. We are striv- 
ing always to improve and update our curriculum and 
methods of teaching. 



FROM THE 
DEPARTMENT HEAD OF ART 

1986 has seen an increasingly rapid revitalization of the 
Art Department. The quality of instruction and the in- 
volvement and achievement of students has continued to 
excel and expand. There have also been some major im- 
provements in instructional facilities and equipment. 
Chelmsford is becoming recognized as a leader in Art 
education throughout the state. 

At the Elementary Level: 

1 . All schools continue to have one Art teacher who is 
in the building every day. 

2. For the first time in many years, all schools now have 
an Art Room with adequate space, storage and sink. 



3. Preliminary steps have been taken towards the goal 
of establishing a gallery in each school, for the pur- 
pose of introducing Art History, Aesthetics and Criti- 
que, as well as addressing other visual learning 
possibilities. 

4. The Elementary Art Faculty has pursued and 
capably carried out new educational initiatives in- 
cluding grant proposals, educational conference 
planning, supervision of student teachers, and con- 
tinuation of personal education. 

At the Middle School: 

1. Efforts have been made to better inform students 
about the expanded opportunities in Art that await 
them at the High School, and the increasing 
possibilities for Art related careers. 

2. The Art Department continues to provide time, in- 
struction and enthusiasm in the designing and mak- 
ing of school dance decorations. 

At the High School: 

1 . The additional new studios have been completed and 
furnished, and are now being utilized for the first 
time. 

2. The reorganization of the existing studio space to 
allow for expansion of Ceramics, Crafts, Graphic and 
Communicative Arts and Sculpture is now complete. 

3. Advanced Placement Art Portfolio Courses have 
doubled since last year. 



Scholastic Art Awards: 


1985 


1986 


1987 


Participating Students 


40 


55 


60 


Portfolios Submitted 


6 


9 


16 


Portfolios Selected 


— 


— 


2 


Total Entries 


101 


126 


167 


Honorable Mentions 


5 


6 


4 


Gold Keys 


6 


11 


15 


Blue Ribbons 


4 


8 




Gold Medals 





1 





5. All three portfolio teachers participated in a one- 
week workshop in which the curriculum was 
strengthened and documented, and, in which sculp- 
ture and printmaking were added. 

6. Three new murals were created by students at the 
High School and one at the Harrington School. 

The Page Gallery has continued to be a showcase for 
student work created by Chelmsford students. It has been 
recognized by the Massachusetts Art Education Associa- 
tion, as one of several models for galleries in schools. In- 
itial plans are under way to expand the utilization of the 
gallery to exhibit professional artwork, museum collections, 
curriculum displays and students artwork exchanges with 
schools from other towns, states and countries. 



126 



REPORT FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
DEPARTMENT HEAD OF ENGLISH 

The talents and dedicated efforts of our High School 
English Department have been recognized during this past 
year. This recognition was in the form of the state cur- 
riculum assessment results and the achievements of our 
students and professional staff. 

Last spring, 549 eleventh grade students participated in 
the state assessment, the resulting data enabling 
Chelmsford to compare the performance of its school 
population to students in similar communities statewide. 
In all language arts skills assessed, Chelmsford High School 
students performed significantly above the state norm and 
well above the performance of similar communities 
statewide. 

The High School English Department was proud to have 
selected Liz Foster and Steve Meidell, Dept. Head, along 
with three Chelmsford colleagues at the elementary level, 
Marilyn LeClair, Marianne Paresky and Carol Tolpa, to 
participate in the UMass Writing Project, a year long cur- 
riculum development seminar. A variety of seminars on the 
teaching of writing were held at the University's Amherst 
campus for two weeks in July. During the subsequent 
academic year, these teachers have been involved in the im- 
plementation of these writing techniques through a 
volunteer workshop for school staff and with their own in- 
dividual students. 

This past year marked the beginning of Chelmsford High 
School's participation in the Young Writers Conference at 
Breadloaf. After submitting samples of their writing, three 
students, Jennifer Hawes, Kristin Morris, and Anush 
Yegyazarian, were selected to work with recognized writers 
in this prestigious program at Middlebury, Vermont. 

In addition, the freshmen honors students, with the 
assistance of faculty member Mary Fay, participated in a 
creative writing project that allowed students to experience 
the process of publication. The students were instructed 
on the process of preparing an original manuscript form 
to the Susquehanna University publication, The Appren- 
tice Writer, which normally only features student writing 
and artwork from grades 10 through 12. The participants 
included Stacey Hallal, Benjamin King, Rachel Warren, 
Lisa Anderson, Jennifer Howard, Kathy Beaucher, 
Rosemary Smith, Sean Polay, and Fred Brusseau. 

As our English curriculum continues to involve our 
students in preparation for their future goals, our students 
continue to demonstrate their preparation for the present. 
Our ninth grade students have placed second in the na- 
tion and first in Massachusetts in the National Language 
Arts Olympiad, a test of grammar, spelling, vocabulary 
and reading comprehension. The High School student 
news magazine, The Voice, received, along with three All- 
Columbian awards, Medalist honors, the highest rating to 
be awarded in this national contest by the Columbia 
Scholastic Press Association, Columbia University. The 
literary magazine, Mosaics, has been awarded second place 



in a similar national contest sponsored by Columbia 
University. The 1985 yearbook, The Lion, won a second 
place from the American Press Association. In addition, 
our students are performing successfully on both the ver- 
bal SAT and English AP exams as well as, after gradua- 
tion, at college and on the job. 

In an effort to identify the needs of all our students, the 
English Department, in conjunction with the Guidance 
Department, is administering a variety of curriculum and 
student assessments. Presently our ninth grade students are 
administered the Cooperative English Test. This test pro- 
duces results that assist the faculty in both student place- 
ment and curriculum design. Beginning September of 
1986, the tenth grade students were given the Metropolitan 
Achievement Tests which provide the English Department 
with a measurement of individual pupil's strengths and 
weaknesses in the areas of reading and language. With this 
information, the talent and dedication of our teaching 
staff, and the support of this community, the English 
Department at Chelmsford High School will continue to 
challenge our students to meet their potential as students 
and citizens of the 21st century. 



FROM THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The foreign language program in Chelmsford continued 
to flourish during the 1986-87 school year. Although 
overall school enrollments are on the decline, the percen- 
tages of students involved in our language courses con- 
tinued to hold steady: 62% at CHS and 45% at McCarthy. 

At McCarthy, in addition to French and Spanish, we 
were able to offer beginning German again, and we also 
added another section to our exploratory program. Two 
different French texts were piloted in two beginning classes 
in anticipation of replacing, in September 1987, the text 
which we had been using for the last 10 years. As McCar- 
thy moves towards implementing the middle school con- 
cept, we hope to explore the possibility of including the 
sixth graders in our language program. 

CHS added Latin IV, Italian II and German III to its 
language offerings. The pilot program to evaluate a new 
French text was also implemented in two beginning classes 
at the high school. Our exchange programs continued to 
be popular and successful. We again sent two groups to 
France, one to Italy and one to Germany. We also hosted 
students from those countries at different times throughout 
the year. This year we finally established a link with a 
school in Spain. In September-October we hosted a group 
of students from Santiago de Compostela, and in February, 
12 CHS students traveled to Spain for a three-week stay. 
We hope that this will be the beginning of a long-term 
relationship between Colegio Manuel Peleteiro and CHS. 

Foreign Language Week was observed during the first 
week in March with a variety of activities at both schools. 
In the spring, the French and Spanish Honor Societies at 
CHS inducted new members who had attained a high stan- 



127 



dard of achievement in their language studies as well as 
in their other academic areas. Candy and croissant sales 
by the French Honor Society provided scholarship awards 
for several graduating senior members. The Foreign 
Language Club was very active throughout the year. A trip 
to Quebec in April was the highlight of the year's activities. 
French students from McCarthy also traveled to Canada. 
A group of about 90 students accompanied by their 
teachers and other administrators spent four days in Mon- 
treal during the April vacation. The variety of extra- 
curricular activities offered to foreign language students 
in Chelmsford is a real tribute to the dedication of the 
foreign language staff. As a department, we are commit- 
ted to promoting, both in and out of the classroom, the 
importance of foreign language. 

As we look to the future, we hope that as enrollments 
decline, we will be able to improve the student-teacher 
ratio in our classes, particularly in the beginning language 
classes. With renewed interest in the importance of foreign 
language, as well as the emphasis on developing proficien- 
cy, we feel that more students should begin their language 
studies earlier and continue for a longer period of time. 
We are committed to the importance of offering language 
sequences that will enable our students to gain a certain 
level of proficiency. And as enrollments in the upper levels 
decline, we will be exploring ways of maintaining our more 
advanced courses as well as the overall integrity of our 
program. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD OF MUSIC 

The Music Department strives to assist students in 
discovering and developing their musical talents for bet- 
ter understanding and enjoyment of all kinds of music. 

The Harrington & Westlands Schools have two part-time 
music specialists, with all other elementary schools having 
one music specialist each, who is responsible for all music 
education in the building except for instruction on band 
and orchestral instruments. Each elementary school has 
weekly lessons in music with a multi-grade level perform- 
ing choral group of approximately 100 students. These 
schools have recorder consorts, and use of instruments in 
both classroom instruction and public performance. Some 
schools also have guitar clubs. 

General music at the McCarthy is given to all sixth, 
seventh and eighth grade students. General music in the 
sixth, seventh and eighth grade is basically designed for 
non-performing students; for many it is their last formal 
contact with music education. All McCarthy students have 
the opportunity to join one of the performing choral 
groups. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an experience 
not found in other areas within the Music Department. 
Instruction in playing orchestral string instruments is of- 
fered starting in grade three, and in all band and orchestral 
instruments from grades four through twelve. Each par- 
ticipating student is offered one small group lesson each 
week. In addition, there is the opportunity to participate 



in small group and larger ensembles during and after 
school. The Byam and South Row Schools have select 
bands that meet once each week after school. The 
"Elementary Select Orchestra" is made up of the more ad- 
vanced orchestra students from all five elementary schools. 
They rehearse after school on Thursdays. The High School 
Symphony Orchestra rehearses Monday evenings. The 
High School Band rehearses Wednesday after school. 
There are approximately 850 students participating in the 
instrumental program. 

Instrumental and choral ensembles perform in school 
and community concerts and programs throughout the 
school year. McCarthy and High School students perform 
in Northeast District and state festivals and competitions. 
Some of the community concerts include: McCarthy's 
elderly luncheon, tours of local nursing homes and Lowell 
General Hospital, Adams Library and "Downtown Cross- 
ing," Boston for WBZ radio. The High School Music 
Department presented "Hello Dolly" as the annual musical 
this past May. 

The Chelmsford Friends of Music, a parental support 
group, has continued to show their support to the total 
music department. They are responsible for the after school 
private lessons program and their scholarship program in- 
cludes private lesson grants, summer music camp and col- 
lege scholarships. Students in all seven schools are eligible 
for these scholarships. 

Our plans for the future are to continue to update our 
secondary curriculum and work toward better in-school 
rehearsal time for our performing groups. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

The Social Studies Department at Chelmsford High 
School continues to offer a variety of required and elec- 
tive courses. The courses are designed to develop inform- 
ed citizens who are aware of the need to insure the dignity 
and worth of each individual, are capable of working for 
the improvement of society, and can recognize the in- 
terdependence of all people. 

During the past year, new textbooks are adapted for 
ninth grade political science and levels two and four United 
States History. Civics Citizens in Action will provide 
students with a good basic source for the study of the struc- 
ture and operation of the American political system. The 
Americans is recognized as a good college preparatory text 
throughout the country. Life and Liberty is a text 
specifically designed to interest non-college students and 
provide them with needed skill development. This stan- 
dardizing and updating of textbooks was a significant 
development for the department. 

The economics course has experienced significant 
growth during the past year. The growth is due to the 
school's affiliation with the Junior Achievement Program. 



128 



Students are provided with workbooks, consultants and 
computer software. They form corporations and par- 
ticipate in simulations that help them to learn through 
practical experience as well as academic lessons. 

Our students continue to participate in a number of 
enrichment programs outside of the classroom. They have 
been involved with The Harvard University Leadership 
Conference, History Day competition, The Framingham 
State College Essay Contest, The Century III Leadership 
Contest, The Harvard University Model United Nations, 
The Boston Globe Stock Market Game, and the Town of 
Chelmsford Student Government Day. 

The teachers in the department have continued to at- 
tend conferences and workshops and to take graduate 
courses in order to maintain their expertise and develop 
new skills. Several have remained active in local, regional 
and state professional organizations. The department is 
also formulating plans for continued curriculum review 
and revision during the upcoming year. 



the microcomputer; the second deals with expanding the 
use of computers in all courses. 

In addition to all of the activity generated by Chapter 
188 we have also undertaken the development of a six year 
plan for the system. This is especially important in the area 
of the sciences. Over the past few years we have seen 
tremendous changes in all areas of technology. In order 
to prepare our students to live in the twenty-first century 
we must plan and act now. The changes are not limited 
to technology. The role and goals of Health Education will 
be a big part of our six year plan. 

The past few years has seen a great many commissions, 
reports and studies which have analyzed the strengths and 
weaknesses of our educational systems. The challenge we 
face is to build on our strengths and improve where needed. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
SCIENCE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The 1985-86 school year has been most interesting and 
challenging. The new curriculum organization has pro- 
vided the opportunity for a more holistic view of school 
programs and will be beneficial as we plan for the future. 

The greatest single factor effecting Chelmsford schools 
this year is Chapter 188 (An Act Improving the Public 
Schools of the Commonwealth). There are many programs 
included under this legislation: Basic Skills and Assessment 
Testing, Professional Development Money, and the Horace 
Mann and Lucretia Crocker Grants. 

The results of the Assessment Testing showed us that 
our third, sixth and eleventh graders are doing very well 
in the areas of Language Arts, Mathematics and Science. 
Our students scored well above the state average in all areas 
tested and, even more importantly, they scored better than 
students in similar communities. The challenge we face 
is maintaining and improving upon these results. It is im- 
portant to remember that any test measures what we learn- 
ed and did in the past. We must strive not to be satisfied 
with the results but to improve. We are confident that the 
results of the Basic Skills Test taken in the fall will be as 
positive as the Assessment scores. 

Another important part of Chapter 188 is the Horace 
Mann Grant Program. These grants, ranging from $1500 
to $2500, are awarded to teachers to work on programs the 
system would not otherwise be able to fund. Four of these 
grants will have a very positive effect on the mathematics 
and science areas. The first two are at the elementary level, 
one deals with increasing the use of computers in the 
mathematics program. The other deals with providing 
more enrichment programs for our most able math 
students. Two more are at the high school level: the first 
deals with interfacing various scientific instruments with 



The 1986-87 school year was very successful and busy 
for the Industrial Arts Department. The High School In- 
dustrial Arts I curriculum was revised to better meet the 
needs and interests of our students. This revision changed 
the four section format of drawing, electricity, wood and 
metals to a three section format of electricity-electronics, 
wood and metals with drawing included as part of each 
of the three sections. Teachers Barry Bell and Bernie 
DiNatale were responsible for this excellent revision. Their 
hard work was greatly appreciated. Another addition to 
the high school curriculum was an educational robot. This 
programmable robot was added to the electronics depart- 
ment to demonstrate the developing technology of robotics 
in industry. Our high school students enjoyed working with 
"Hero," our robot, and came up with many amazing 
"tricks" for Hero to perform. Senior Jim Midgley put 
together a very impressive demonstration and took Hero 
"on tour" to the elementary and middle schools. 

The 1987-88 school year is shaping up to be every bit 
as busy and exciting as this year. Curriculum revisions 
under consideration at the middle school include expan- 
ding the Industrial Arts curriculum to grade six and a unit 
of home construction and repair in grade eight. Teachers 
Mike Cerullo and Paul Tagliamonte are hard at work mak- 
ing plans for these two additions to our middle school 
department. The high school department is planning to 
add a second course in small engine repair. The small 
engine repair course has grown very quickly and the de- 
mand is there for a second course. Small engine repair II 
will include troubleshooting techniques and equipment 
maintenance and repair. Perhaps the most exciting pro- 
posal for next year is the addition of a computer aided 
drawing (CAD) curriculum to the technical drawing 
department. Plans are being made to develop a second 
level course in technical drawing and architectural draw- 
ing to include extensive use of CAD equipment. 

Many thanks to the hard working staff in the Industrial 
Arts department for a job well done this year. 



129 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A major focus for the Physical Education Department 
during the past year has been fitness. At the elementary 
level a publication called FITTING IN has been intro- 
duced for classroom and/or library use. FITTING IN is 
a monthly newsletter for fifth and sixth grade students that 
covers topics in health, fitness, exercise, and nutrition. It 
is hoped that early exposure to these topics will help guide 
children in the development of a healthy lifestyle. 

At the Parker School a pilot program called WALK- 
ING WELLNESS is being conducted by Ms. Jean Schissel 
with the cooperation of Mrs. Noella Byam and her fifth 
grade students. The WALKING WELLNESS curriculum 
combines health and physical education with reading, 
writing, math, science and lifestyle planning. The cur- 
riculum was developed by Robert Sweetgall. Mr. Sweet- 
gall is founder and director of the Foundation for the 
Development of Cardiovascular Health and is well-known 
for his 11,600 mile walking journey throughout the fifty 
states. The Parker WALKING WELLNESS program is 
off to a "healthy" start. 

The first FITNESSGRAMS were issued last spring to all 
fourth, seventh, and ninth grade students. The same grade 
levels will be tested this spring. The FITNESSGRAM, a 
computerized fitness report card, charts a child's progress 
on the Health Related Fitness Test and compares scores 
to the national norms. In addition, an exercise prescrip- 
tion is given when warranted by the test results. A detail- 
ed statistical report was compiled for each school from the 
FITNESSGRAM results to be used for program evalua- 
tion. Townwide students tested in the average to above 
average categories as compared to national norms. 

The Physical Education Staff, as a result of their train- 
ing for and participation in the FITNESSGRAM program, 
earned certification as National FITNESSGRAM Instruc- 
tors from the Institute for Aerobics Research in Dallas. 

A goal of the Physical Education Department is to con- 
tinue to provide innovative and current fitness and health 
programs for our students and to expand the programs 
already in place. 

Last year a series of articles was submitted to the various 
school newsletters detailing the FITNESSGRAM program 
as well as other programs in our curriculum. The purpose 
of the articles was to inform and involve parents in a 
cooperative effort to instill the lifetime skills and attitudes 
required to promote good health for their children. 

The Elementary Physical Education Staff has successfully 
implemented a developmental progress chart in grades one 
through three. The chart is a report card supplement that 
details the progress of a child in a variety of physical and 
behavioral categories. A future goal is to use the detailed 
information to develop individualized classes that address 
the specific needs of our students in their initial exposure 
to Physical Education. 



The Project Adventure program at McCarthy Middle 
School continued to expand with the addition of several 
challenging, new elements to the ropes course. Karl 
Rohnke, Executive Director of Project Adventure, 
presented a workshop at the middle school entitled "Silver 
Bullets" based on his fourth and most recent book of the 
same title. The book is a guide to adventure games, in- 
itiative problems, and trust activities which are lead-ups 
to the ropes course elements of Project Adventure. 

Dr. Pat Griffin, coordinator of the Second Wind In- 
service Program at UMASS Amherst, will lead a cur- 
riculum workshop at the McCarthy Middle School this 
winter. Last year Chelmsford High School was fortunate 
to have had Dr. Griffin present a secondary curriculum 
workshop. 

The High School Physical Education Staff continues to 
expand the activities within the curriculum. A goal is to 
develop an in-school health and fitness program and ex- 
panded intramural program that students would be able 
to participate in during their free time as an enhancement 
to their scheduled Physical Education classes. An addi- 
tional goal is to pursue the development of a Fitness Trail 
that would include a variety of outdoor exercise stations 
interspersed along a jogging trail. This would be a 
beneficial addition to not only the high school Physical 
Education program, but also to the surrounding schools 
and to the community. 

A workshop entitled FOOD POWER was presented by 
Laura Cooper, R.D., nutrition education consultant for 
the National Food and Dairy Council, and to the Physical 
Education Staff and coaching staff at Chelmsford High 
School this year. The workshop addressed issues of nutri- 
tion in relation to athletic training and competition, weight 
control, and the importance of fluids to performance. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

Chelmsford Schools has had an in-house business com- 
puter system now for five years. During this time all ma- 
jor data processing service contracts have been cancelled 
and implemented on our own in-house systems. The school 
staff now performs all the necessary maintenance on data 
bases in the area of student, accounting, personnel, cen- 
sus, scheduling, attendance and other information. 

A Digital 11/44, Vax/750 minicomputer and various 
microcomputers are the main vehicles for this academic 
and administrative computing. Donations and grants of 
computer equipment from individuals as well as companies 
has lessened the financial impact on this technology driven 
computer industry. 

With the proliferation of microcomputers, people, in 
the not too distant future, who don't understand computers 
will have the same status as people who can't read today. 

Microcomputers, which have shaken the very founda- 



130 



tion of computing, continue to be implemented in the area 
of word processing, electronic spreadsheet, data bases and 
graphic displays. Microcomputer to mainframe com- 
munication continue to be one of the more important 
obstacles to full computer resource use. In general, soft- 
ware advances have not kept pace with hardware 
developments in the micro area. 

The Town Clerk's Office and the school computer facili- 
ty continue to work as a team in the maintenance of town 
citizen data on the school computer. The Town Clerk's Of- 
fice provides the staff to update and maintain the records 
while the school computer department provides the com- 
puter resources. The town census, men and women book, 
voter registration lists, precinct reports, name and address 
labels, dog registers, school department reports, jury lists 
and jury tapes are all processed on the school computer. 

This coming year's major computer effort will be in the 
updating and modifying of voter information as it relates 
to the new redistricting scheme. Other town departments 
serviced by the school computer are Council on Aging, 
Town Candidates for office, Town Library, Selectmen's 
School Warrant Report, Community Education, PTA, 
Booster Club, Nashoba Valley Technical Vocational 
School. 

This data and telecommunication needs for the school 
are also being evaluated. Most of the schools have old 
rotary systems which reflect twenty year old technology. 
Future studies in this area will be geared to system integra- 
tion of voice, image, graphics, text, and data. Technical 
obstacles of this ambitious endeavor are formidable. This 
capability has potential to significantly reduce our future 
communications cost as well as bring the offices into the 
"trailing-edge" of office automation. 



from the principal of 
the McCarthy middle school 

The McCarthy School is currently in the middle of a 
philosophical and organizational change to the middle level 
educational concept. This year for the first time sixth grade 
students were housed at the McCarthy. In 1987, all sixth, 
seventh, and eighth grade students will be in attendance 
at the McCarthy Middle School. 

The middle school concept of education has as its main 
emphasis a teaming approach in the instruction of the basic 
curriculum. The staff at the middle school level is 
characterized by teachers who are committed to encourag- 
ing students to understand "how" to learn rather than 
"what" to leam. Subject matter content is utilized as a vehi- 
cle to teach skills for continuous learning in life. The mid- 
dle school concept leads to increased interest in school and 
learning and better achievement on standardized tests. 

The academic program at the McCarthy continues to 
maintain a high standard of excellence. Students receive 
instructions in the basic subjects of language arts, 
mathematics, science, and social studies. Instructional em- 



phasis is also placed on reading, the foreign language, and 
cultural as well as practical arts. 

"Project 300" and "Toys for Tots" are two major ser- 
vice projects that the student body of the McCarthy con- 
tinue to be involved in. The "Project 300" effort produced 
a donation of over 4000 items of food for needy families 
in the local area. 

This year the McCarthy Middle School presented both 
a winter and spring concert which showcased the musical 
talents of the students. These were well attended by both 
staff and parents. The presentation of Showboat 86, 
McCarthy's annual talent show was also a major success. 

The intramural activity program at the McCarthy con- 
tinues to be a major source of student involvement. The 
students also participate in a variety of clubs and activities 
as part of the after school program. 

This past year the McCarthy PTO was established. The 
PTO sponsored two fund raising activities to help support 
programs for the students. An outstanding program was 
presented to the entire student body by the Kalediscope 
Theater players. The program entitled "I'm Special, You're 
Special" focused on how retarded and handicapped peo- 
ple are accepted by others. The PTO has also been an im- 
portant liaison between parents,, administration and staff. 
At the year's end, the PTO sponsored a teacher apprecia- 
tion breakfast. 

A major concern for future years is the need for a staff 
person to work directly with gifted and talented students 
in grades 7 and 8. The district's EPOCH program provides 
a coordinated effort for gifted and talented students 
through grade 6. Currently the administration and staff 
are pursuing state grants to assist with the planning and 
implementation of a program for these students. 

The administration and staff of the McCarthy are 
grateful for the support of the Chelmsford community. We 
will continue to focus our efforts to ensure the social, in- 
tellectual, physical and emotional well-being of our 
students. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT 
HEAD OF SCIENCE, GRADES 9-12 

This past year there have been a few changes in the 
science department staff. Fred Leger, physics, was releas- 
ed because of a reduction in the teaching staff. We will 
miss Mr. Leger. He was an integral part of our physics 
program. 

Patricia Demaras, part-time chemistry, was transferred 
to the junior high to fill a part-time math position. Pat 
is also teaching an elementary music class. Mrs. Demaras' 
expertise in the field of chemical education will be missed. 

A large percentage of the staff participated in in-service 
workshops. The entire chemistry staff attended a chemical 
demonstrations workshop put on by Irwin Talesnick of 



131 



Queen's University, Ontario. This event was presented by 
Phillips Academy in conjunction with the Merrimack 
Valley Science Teacher's Support Network. Mrs. Dorothy 
Gillispie and Mr. Michael Winn attended a genetics 
workshop at Salem State College. 

The physics and physical science staffs had the oppor- 
tunity to participate in a physics demonstration workshop 
presented by John Clarke of Tewksbury High School. This 
workshop was held in three sessions at the high school. 

Seven of the chemistry and biology staff attended a cur- 
riculum workshop hosted by the D.C. Heath Publishing 
Co. 

Mr. Donald Parkhurst attended a five week workshop 
for advanced placement chemistry teachers held at Hope 
College in Holland Michigan. The chemistry curriculum 
has already benefited from Mr. Parkhurst's summer. 

Mr. Bernard Queenan spent two weeks of his summer 
at the University of Massachusetts getting updated in the 
field of genetics. 

The entire biology staff participated in a four day level 
III biology curriculum workshop. The results of this ef- 
fort are now being enjoyed by CHS students. 

Thanks to the continued efforts of the staff and the con- 
tinued support of the administration we are able to keep 
our curriculum up to date. Science is ever changing and 
so is our curriculum. 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The Chelmsford High School Mathematics Department 
continues to adapt its curriculum to meet the needs of all 
students while challenging every individual student to meet 
his or her potential. 



Mathematics League. In the Annual Mathematics Olym- 
piad Level One Examination, Chelmsford High School had 
two students who are finalists and three other students who 
were awarded Certificates of Merit. 

At a time when there is much national concern with 
respect to quality of mathematics instruction and qualifica- 
tions of mathematics teachers, Chelmsford High School 
remains fortunate. We are an experienced highly 
motivated, well-qualified, dedicated and diversified staff . 
It is our constant effort that will enable us to provide the 
students of the Town of Chelmsford with the technical skills 
necessary for them to function and succeed in our increas- 
ingly complex and changing society. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The Business Department presently has eight staff 
members with expertise in a wide range of Business and 
Distributive Education subject areas. In addition to the 
eight staff members, the department has a business 
resource specialist and a business resource aide for the 
business resource classroom. Monies for the positions of 
resource specialist and aide were again granted to 
Chelmsford by the Federal Government as a result of the 
efforts of business staff members in developing the grant 
proposal. 

This past summer the Business Education Department 
conducted a two day workshop on computerized accoun- 
ting. Mrs. Meg Conant and Mr. Dennis Savosik successfully 
prepared materials for a new course which will be offered 
next school year. 

The Business Education Department also received this 
past summer fifty new Xerox Memorywriters to complete 
the updating of the typewriter equipment. All three typ- 
ing rooms now have typewriters that are not over three 
years old. 



Although there were no dramatic changes in the con- 
tent of the curriculum last year, the Mathematics depart- 
ment did adopt two new textbooks. After months of intense 
review by a committee of nine high school Mathematics 
teachers, the committee chose to adopt Merrill Algebra 
Two and Merrill Advanced Mathematical Concepts. These 
texts are presently being used as the primary text source 
in our accelerated level of these subject areas. A commit- 
tee of five high school teachers are now in the process of 
reviewing potential replacement texts for our Algebra One 
book which is outdated and in poor physical condition 
because of age and overuse. 

Our students continue to perform well above the na- 
tional average in the Mathematics section of the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test. As usual, our students did extremely well 
on the Advanced Placement Examinations in Calculus AB, 
Calculus BC, and Computer Science. The High School 
Mathematics Team continues to perform well in their com- 
petitions in the Merrimack Valley conference, the New 
England Mathematics League, and the Atlantic-Pacific 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD OF 
HOME ECONOMICS 

The Home Economics Department offers a wide range 
of courses which are designed to meet the needs and in- 
terests of the students for their present and future daily 
living needs. 

Home Economics begins at the 7th grade level with co- 
educational courses and continues with electives at the 
High School. With the proposal of McCarthy becoming 
a middle school in September 1987 and housing all the 
sixth grade students in town, we are working towards our 
goal of developing a course outline/curriculum for all 
grade 6 students. 

Once again, the Parenting Resource Center, located in 
our Family Living area, was funded through a federal 
grant. 



132 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF CHAPTER I 

Title I of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Act 
(ESEA) was passed by the United States Congress to help 
local schools overcome educational deprivation. Under the 
law, the federal government appropriates money annually 
to school districts throughout the nation. The funds re- 
ceived by each community are determined by the 
government. 

Project proposals are written by the director, BeverlyJ. 
Hedison, and sent to the State Department of Education 
to be initiated in each area as a compensatory educational 
program. 

Chapter I has been part of the Chelmsford School System 
since 1975. The children are instructed in reading and 
mathematics at the Harrington School (grades 1-3), the 
Parker School (grades 4-6), and the Westlands school 
(grades 1-5). Westlands' students have the opportunity to 
be part of the CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction) Pro- 
gram. The use of this added tool of learning has proven 
to be very popular and has produced good results. 

A child's participation in this project does not mean that 
a student is not capable, but only that he/she is not, for 
one reason or another, working to his or her potential. In- 
struction in the past has proven beneficial in mathematics 
and reading, as well as in improving the child's self-image. 
With the combined efforts of the teaching staff, ad- 
ministration and interested parents, we are preparing the 
whole child for the future as well as the present. 



FROM THE DEPARTMEMT HEAD 
FOR SCIENCE, GRADES 6-8 

The major goal of the science curricula, grades six 
through eight, is to develop in the students the skills of 
scientific investigation which involves not only measure- 
ment and laboratory techniques but also problem-solving 
situations. To accomplish this goal the science teachers 
employ a variety of techniques which involve notetaking 
along with the keeping of a notebook, audio-visuals, oral 
exercises, laboratory activities and homework. These 
techniques are used to develop organizational, listening, 
thinking and research skills. The sixth grade content in- 
volves units in the life, earth and physical sciences as well 
as health while the seventh grade curriculum stresses the 
life sciences and the eighth grade program involves geology, 
astronomy, meterology and oceanography. 

The science staff has been extremely active this year in 
two areas. First, staff members have been attending 
meetings and workshops to prepare for the change to a 
middle school. Second, members of the department have 
been involved in writing new and enrichment activities, 
organizing field trips and guest speakers, testing science 
software and implementing more basic skills and computers 
into the science classroom. 

The major goals for the department are to provide for 
a smooth incorporation and transition of the sixth, seventh 
and eighth grade science programs into a middle school 
environment and to keep abreast of innovations in science 
curricula. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF GUIDANCE 

Following are pertinent facts and figures for the Class 
of 1986; also included are Chelmsford High School and 
Nashoba Tech statistics for an overview of Chelmsford 
public school graduates. We have also included a report 
from our Employment Counselor and a 6 year S.A.T. com- 
parison with 3 reference groups. 



Number of Graduates 
Four-year colleges 
Two-year colleges 
Other Post-secondary 
Total Post-secondary 
Employment 
Military 
Undecided 
A.F.S. 



1982 




1983 




1984 




1985 




1986 




611 




620 




560 




526 




495 




379 


62% 


384 


62% 


370 


66% 


369 


70% 


345 


70% 


89 


15% 


77 


13% 


61 


11% 


60 


11% 


52 


11% 


17 


3% 


20 


3% 


18 


3% 


12 


2% 


17 


3% 


485 


80% 


481 


78% 


449 


80% 


441 


84% 


414 


84% 


102 


16% 


105 


16% 


95 


17% 


85 


16% 


81 


16% 


12 


2% 


9 


2% 


6 


1% 


6 


1% 


4 




10 


2% 


23 


4% 


6 
4 


1% 


1 
1 




1 





Highlights: 

Of the 495 graduates, 84% will continue their education. 

Enrollments in 4 year colleges and universities represent 
70% of all graduates, while two year colleges attracted 11% 



of th class. Employment and the military continue to draw 
16% of the graduates. 

The top 10% all will attend 4 year colleges, with Univer- 
sity of New Hampshire, University of Vermont, University 
of Massachusetts and Holy Cross being most popular. 



133 



Engineering and science-related careers again prove to be 
most attractive, with business careers continuing to grow 
in popularity. 

Of the top 20% of the class (90), 100% will continue 
their education. 

Following is a survey of career choices: 



227 



118 



32 
22 



71 

20 

495 



The Professional Field, Medicine, Law, 

Teaching, Engineering, Etc. 

Managers, Proprietors and Officials 

Manage a business, own your own 

business, etc. 

Clerical, Secretarial, Office Work 

Skilled Worker — Craftsman 

A foreman with a trade 

Semi-skilled Worker 

Truck Driver, Factory Worker 

Unskilled Worker 

Construction 

Other not listed 

Undecided 



The drop out rate continues to drop (2.1%). 

The A/P results were gratifying with college credit be- 
ing earned in 81 of the 95 exams written. 85%. 

1,813 transcripts were processed for the graduating class; 
543 for past graduates for a total of 2,356. 

Over 400 students gained employment through the ef- 
forts of the Career Center counselors. All of the graduates 
seeking employment after graduation were able to find a 
place in the work force. 

The graduating classes have been diminishing steadily 
since 1983, with this graduating class numbering 495. Quite 
surprisingly the Class of 1987 numbers 564 as of January 
5, 1987. 

SCHOOL JOB PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

Students seeking part-time, permanent, and summer 
employment are assisted through the Job Placement pro- 
gram. Almost all students continue to seek employment 
for at least a portion of the school year. An effort is made 
to place students in career related choices if possible. 

Rapport with area businesses continues to grow with 
employers listing openings which will meet their needs. 
Through working, the students are able to learn new skills 
and meet the challenges of a work environment. Assistance 
in interviewing techniques and resume writing is given in 
the Career Center. Close to 400 students were placed in 
employment during the school year. 

Over thirty-five college students have returned to seek 
assistance for summer employment. Non-college bound 



students are encouraged to use the Job Placement program 
as a future resource for assistance with career placement. 

Over 300 Chelmsford High School students attended the 
Regional Job Fair plus over 100 students from local area 
high schools. The Fair is designed especially for non-college 
bound seniors but all students are encouraged to attend, 
having an opportunity to set up appointments and hold 
informal interviews with area employers. 

TOP 10% OF CLASS OF 1986 



SECONDARY PLANS 


MAJOR 


Brown 


Undeclared 


Dartmouth 


Biology 


Dartmouth 


Undecided 


M.I.T. 


Computer Science 


Univ. of Maine 


Computer Science 


Cornell 


Communications 


Lake Erie College 


Dance 


Univ. of Penn. 


Foreign Languages 


U.S. Coast Guard Acad. 


Pre- Law 


Syracuse 


Spec. Ed. 


Brown 


Undecided 


Northeastern 


Phys. Ed. 


Univ. of Vermont 


Undecided 


Univ. of California 


Engineering 


Univ. of New Hampshire 


Pred-Med 


Fitchburg State 


Psychology 


R.I. School of Design 


Graphic Design 


Univ. of New Hampshire 


Hotel Mgnt. 


Univ. of Mass. 


Undecided 


Boston College 


Pre -Med 


Univ. of Mass. 


Communications 


Univ. of Mass. 


English 


Tufts 


Intl. Relations 


Univ. of New Hampshire 


Comp. Science 


Univ. of Mass. 


Elec. Engineering 


Holy Cross 


Undecided 


Duke Univ. 


Elec. Engineering 


Penn State Univ. 


Engineering 


Univ. of Lowell 


Business 


Univ. of New Hampshire 


Comp. Science 


Univ. of New Hampshire 


Biology 


Univ. of Lowell 


Elec. Engineering 


McGill Univ. 


Biology/Pre-Vet 


Boston Univ. 


journalism 


Univ. of Vermont 


Business 


Univ. of Lowell 


Accounting 


Holy Cross 


Biology 


Holy Cross 


English 


Univ. of Colorado 


Pol. Science 


Univ. of Vermont 


Engineering 


Boston Conservatory 


Music Ed/Piano 


Univ. of Vermont 


Elec. Engineering 


Univ. of Florida 


Aerospace Enginee 


Worcester Poly Tech 


Engineering 


Univ. of New Hampshire 


Nutrition 


Univ. of Mass. 


Communications 


Tufts 


Pre- Med 


Brandeis Univ. 


Government 


Holy Cross 


Pre- Med 



TOP 10% COLLEGE CHOICE SUMMARY 

Boston College 

Boston Conservatory 

Brandeis University 

Brown 

Boston University 

Cornell 

Dartmouth 

Duke 

Fitchburg State 

Holy Cross 



134 



Lake Erie College 

McGill University 

M.I.T. 

Northeastern 

Penn State 

Rhode Island School of Design 

Syracuse 

Tufts 

U.S. Air Force Academy 

U.S. Coast Guard Academy 

Univ. of California/Santa Cruz 

Univ. of Colorado 

Univ. of Florida 

Univ. of Lowell 

Univ. of Maine 

Univ. of Mass. 

Univ. of New Hampshire 

Univ. of Pennsylvania 

Univ. of Vermont 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

TOP 10% SUMMARY OF CAREER PLANS 

Accounting 

Biology 

Business Management 

Communications 

Computer Science 

Dance 

Engineering (General) 

Engineering (Aerospace) 

Engineering (Electrical) 

English 

Foreign Languages 

Government 

Graphic Design 

Hotel Management 

International Relations 

Journalism 

Music 

Nutrition 

Physical Education 

Political Science 

Pre -Law 

Pre-Med 

Psychology 

Special Education 

Undeclared 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMS 

TEST DATE -MAY 1986 
70 Candidates took 95 Exams 



1 


College of the Holy Cross 


2 


1 


University of California/Santa Cruz 




1 


St. Anselm College 




1 


Colby College 




1 


Maryland Institute/College of Art 




1 


Boston Conservatory of Music 




1 


New England College 




2 


Rhode Island School of Design 




1 


Gordon College 




1 


Babson College 




1 


University of Vermont 




1 


Cornell University 




1 


Tufts University 




3 


University of New Hampshire 




1 


William Smith College 




5 


Dartmouth College 




6 


University of Colorado/ Boulder 




1 


University of Florida 




4 


Syracuse University 




1 


Mass. Institute of Technology 
Carnegie-Mellon University 
Colorado State University 
University of Maine/Orono 




1 


Stonehill College 


2 


4 


Boston College 


1 


2 


Lake Erie College 


2 



Colleges Receiving A/P Scores (34) 

University of Massachusetts 

Brown University 

Bentley College 

Duke University 

Fitchburg State 

Boston University 

Worcester Poly Tech 

U.S. Military Academy 



No 



of Reports 

10 

2 

1 
1 
1 

1 
5 

1 



A/P COORDINATOR'S REPORT 

Scores are reported on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being 
the highest. College credit is usually granted for 3, 4, and 5. 

Chelmsford High Scores: 



Subject 
American History 


Score Range 
Low High 
12 3 4 5 

14 2 


College 
Credit 
Possible 

% 
7/7 100% 


Class 

7 


Taking 
Exam 

% 
100% 


Art — Studio 








1 


1/1 


100% 


16 


.06% 


Biology 


2 


7 


5 1 


13/15 


87% 


24 


63% 


Chemistry 


1 


S 





3/4 


75% 


11 


36% 


Computer Science 








1 4 


5/5 


100% 


12 


42% 


English Comp & Lit 


3 


6 


8 5 


19/22 


86% 


22 


100% 


European History 


Dropped 


as 


in A/P Course 








French Lang. 


1 
Dropped 


2 


2/3 
n A/P Course 


67% 


Not Offered 


Math — Calculus AB 


2 3 


9 


7 3 


19/24 


79% 


44 


55% 


Math -Calculus BC 





1 


1 7 


9/9 


100% 


17 


41% 


Physics B 


2 


1 





3 


A/P Course Not Offered 


Spanish Lang. 



Dropped 


2 2 
as an A/P Course 


A/P Course Not Offered 


TOTAL 


3 11 


32 


26 23 


81/95 









College credit possible in 81 our of 95 = 85% 



ADDENDUM TO INCLUDE ALL CHELMSFORD 

PUBLIC 

SECONDARY STUDENTS 

CHELMSFORD HIGH & NASHOBA TECH. 



Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba Tech. (Chelmsford Srs.) 



Total Post 


Total 


(Employment, 


Secondary 


Others 


military, etc.) 


414 


81 


495 



135 



PERCENTAGES 

Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba Tech. (Chelmsford Srs.) 

COMBINED 77.2% 



83.6% 
18.5% 



16.4% 
81.5% 



DROP OUT REPORT FOR SCHOOL YEAR 1985-86 



i of 1986 Boys 
i of 1986 Girls 



i of 1987 Boys 
: of 1987 Girls 



: of 1988 Boys 
, of 1988 Girls 



of 1989 Boys 
of 1989 Girls 



TOTAL STUDENTS 



257 
254 



298 
292 



522 
2179 



D.O. 


= 


251 


DO. 


= 


251 


DO. 


= 


502 


DO 


= 


289 


DO. 


= 


287 


DO. 


= 


576 


DO. 


= 


275 


DO. 


= 


268 


DO. 


= 


543 


DO. 


= 


250 


DO. 


= 


263 



251 = 2.3% 



45 D.O. = 2134 = 2.1 



Class of 1986 — Employment 
Voluntary 
Requested to Leave 



; of 1987 — Employment 
Voluntary 
Requested to Leave 



Class of 1988 — Employment 
Voluntary 
Requested to Leave 



; of 1989 — Employment 
Voluntary 
Requested to Leave 



COMPARISON OF C.H.S. S.A.T. 
SCORES WITH THREE OTHER REFERENCE 





Verbal 




Math 








Mean 




Mean 




Number 




Score 




Score 




Tested 


1981 












CHS Seniors 


426 




476 




530 


Mass. HS Seniors 


422 




462 




58.036 


New England Seniors 


425 




■163 




118,157 


Nationwide Seniors 


424 




466 




944,046 


1982 












CHS Seniors 


443 


( + 17) 


490 


+ 14) 


505 


Mass. HS Seniors 


425 




463 




56,435 


New England Seniors 


428 




464 




115,794 


Nationwide Seniors 


426 




467 




988,680 


1983 












CHS Seniors 


435 


(-8) 


484 


(-6) 


505 


Mass. HS Seniors 


427 




463 




54,310 


New England Seniors 


430 




465 




111,494 


Nationwide Seniors 


425 




468 




962,877 


1984 












CHS Seniors 


440 


( + 5) 


492 


( + 8) 


480 


Mass. HS Seniors 


429 




467 




52,534 


New England Seniors 


432 




468 




106,698 


Nationwide Seniors 


426 




471 




964,739 



1985 














CHS Seniors 


448 


( + 8) 


499 


(+7) 


453 


At CHS 


Mass. HS Seniors 


434 




472 




51,702 


86% 


New England Seniors 


436 




473 




107,420 


took it 


Nationwide Seniors 


431 




475 




977,361 




1986 














CHS Seniors 


453 


( + 5) 


502 


( + 3) 


439 


At CHS 


Mass. HS Seniors 


436 




473 




50,566 


88% 


New England Seniors 


Not Avail 


ible 








took the 


Nationwide Seniors 


431 




475 




1,000,748 


SATs 



FROM THE RESOURCE INSTRUCTOR 
FOR GIFTED/TALENTED 

The Enrichment Program of Chelmsford is designed to 
offer extended enrichment to those children who need a 
program beyond that of the regular classroom. 

Among the exploratory (Type I) activities of this past 
year were the Norlands Living History experience, a heart 
catheter demonstration, a presentation on genetics, and 
oral history presentations on railroad experiences of a 
senior citizen. The process skills (Type II) activities includ- 
ed creative and critical thinking, creative problem-solving, 
and advanced research skills. The students have applied 
these skills in their in-depth (Type III) investigations. Some 
outstanding Type III projects were displayed at the 
EPOCH Curriculum Fair last June. 

Some of the projects presented were: a model turbine 
to demonstrate water power, a military aircraft presenta- 
tion, a mini piano recital on Mozart, a Ballet demonstra- 
tion, an original computer program, a mini violin recital, 
and a variety of other interesting topics which were shared 
in numerous creative ways. 

A comittee has been formed to design a program for 
the McCarthy Middle School so that those students iden- 
tified in the elementary school may continue in a program 
of extended enrichment at McCarthy. 



FROM THE SUPERVISOR OF 
INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

The school year 1985/86 was a time of transition for the 
Instructional Media Department. Longtime program 
supervisor, Betsey Bohl, retired and was replaced by Patt 
Moser. The operation of Cable 43 was undertaken by Gerry 
Rigby and Matt Scott. With new people came some 
changes. 

The libraries had another successful year of loaning 
books to students, serving classes, and helping teachers. 
However, because of a budget freeze in October, the ac- 
tual number of books in each library dropped. The follow- 
ing statistics illustrate the situation. 





Elementary 


Middle 


High 


Total circulation 


88,384 


15.617 


14,621 


Number of books checked out 








per student 


36 


15 


7 



136 



Average daily circulation 




491 


87 


81 


Total books purchased 




625 


244 


661 


Total books withdrawn* 




1.915 


2.507 


893 


Net loss of books 




-1.290 


■2,263 


-232 


Number of class visits. 


All cli 
once 


per week 


251 


596 


Student Aides 




48 


23 


15 


Adult Volunteers 




50 


3 






*Books are withdrawn for a variety of reasons: they may be lost, damaged beyond 
repair, or contain information that is no longer accurate. 

Several new programs were undertaken in the high 
school library. Freshmen orientation was accomplished 
through a slide/tape entitled "As the Nerd Turns." Con- 
tests were offered to celebrate Halloween, Thanksgiving, 
the winter holidays, Valentine's Day and St. Patrick's Day. 
With over 85,000 students visits to the library during the 
school year, it was a very busy place. 

The middle school library held its fifth annual book fair 
and earned $383 to use in the purchase of paperback 
books. The newly-instituted Sustained Silent Reading pro- 
gram meant that students used the library more often. And 
for the first time, sixth graders began attending the McCar- 
thy School where they received an orientation to the library 
along with library skills lessons. 

The elementary schools held their first annual Poetry 
Festival in honor of National Children's Book Week. Poems 
were read during regular library periods, prizes were given 
out for "poems-in-a-pocket" and over 350 students wrote 
their own poems for a contest. In the spring, the town and 
school libraries formed an organization called "School and 
Public Libraries of Chelmsford" (SAPLOC). Its first ac- 
tivity was a writing contest entitled "Chelmsford in 2001" 
which was offered to residents of all ages and funded by 
Apollo Computers. For the first time, all five elementary 
schools were open one day per week after school. Most of 
these hours were funded by the Parent Teacher Organiza- 
tions. Finally, the sixth graders were tested in October and 
again in May to determine their library skills. The average 
score in October 1985, was 71.5%. That score rose to 80% 
in May 1986. 

The Instructional Media Center checked out over 2892 
items during 1985/86. Topping the list was 1347 film check 
outs, 792 video tape check outs, and 598 sound filmstrip 
checkouts. These totals do not reflect the use of audio visual 
software held by individual schools. 

Our graphic artist continued producing numerous in- 
structional aides, graphics, charts, slides, photographs, 
signs, logos, and overhead transparencies with the help of 
high school students. Our audio visual technician com- 
pleted the yearly maintenance check of over 1500 pieces 
of equipment and made ongoing repairs throughout the 
year. Over 1530 books were cataloged by the cataloging 
department. In addition, the McCarthy library was inven- 
toried and the list of audio visual software was updated. 

Cable 43 came under the wing of the Instructional 
Media department in September. Lowell Ford donated to 
the town of Chelmsford a brand new Aerostar van for the 
exclusive use of Cable 43. The van is now used at all remote 



telecasts. For the first time, television production classes 
were offered in the adult evening school. This class pro- 
duced a program about the mounting trash problem, call- 
ed "Land of Plenty", which was nominated for a 
Hometown U.S.A. national award. High School students 
continued their involvement with television by producing 
a program called "CHS: An Introduction" which did win 
a Hometown U.S.A. award. This program is now being 
used as an informational program for parents and students. 
Over 1 ,090 hours of programming gave Chelmsford a good 
look at its town government, its school system, its senior 
citizens, and a variety of topics of interest to many. 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Since September, 1974, the Special Education Depart- 
ment has implemented Chapter 766, The Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Special Education Law of 1972. In 
September 1978, P.L. 94-142, the Education of the Handi- 
capped Children Act became effective. Both laws entitle 
special needs students the right to a free and appropriate 
education. Students, ages three through twenty-one years, 
who have not received a high school diploma or its 
equivalent, and who have been determined by the Evalua- 
tion Team to have a special need, are eligible for special 
education services. 

The Chelmsford Special Education Department began 
the September, 1986, school year with 696 students 
registered to receive special education services which is 12.7 
percent of Chelmsford's total school enrollment. 

Chelmsford has a comprehensive program to serve the 
special needs children in our community. To develop and 
implement Individualized Educational Plans, Chelmsford 
employs a staff of specialists in learning disabilities, speech 
pathology, adaptive physical education, occupational 
therapy, visual impairment, hearing impairment, psycho- 
logical services, social services, and vocational services. For 
students who require more comprehensive educational pro- 
grams, there are twelve resource classes staffed by special 
education teachers who are assisted by instructional aides. 
Private day and residential schools provide for students 
with severe learning and/or emotional needs. 

The Special Education Department has begun to place 
computers in its programs for student and teacher use. On 
July 2nd, 1986 a Grant Application for Discretionary funds 
under Public Law 93-142 was submitted and approved by 
the Department of Education. The purpose of this grant 
was to increase special needs staff skills and awareness in 
the use of computers in instruction and to develop strategies 
to effectively implement computers within the special needs 
programs. 

The Early Childhood Grant written last spring was able 
to increase staff skills in assessing pre-school children and 
to obtain the necessary supplies and materials and equip- 



137 



ment to carry out a comprehensive early childhood 
program. 

For the first time Chelmsford has an integrated nursery 
class, accommodating special needs children and children 
without special needs. The development of this program 
was made possible by the working partnership between 
Special Education and the Community Education 
Program. 

The early childhood outreach identification program is 
another program implemented this past year. Several times 
a year a multi-disciplinary team will conduct a screening 
for all children ages 3 and 4. 

A Special Education Parent Advisory Council (PAC) was 
formed in October of 1986. The purpose of the PAC is 
to serve as advisor to the Special Education Department. 

The Merrimack Special Education Collaborative, in 
which Chelmsford participates, continues to provide ef- 
fective and cost-efficient programs for children with low- 
incidence disabilities. Classes, held in Dracut and 
Tewksbury, service the needs of children from Chelmsford, 
Billerica, Dracut, Tewksbury and Westford. 

For the current school year, the Chelmsford Special 
Education Department has a budget of $2,249,245. In ad- 
dition, the town will receive $173,316. from the federal 
government for special education and vocational programs. 

The Special Education Department, along with the Mer- 
rimack Special Education Collaborative, continues to pro- 
vide pre-vocational and vocational programs through the 
Center for Occupational Awareness and Placement (Pro- 
ject CO. A. P.). As a result, many students have been suc- 
cessfully placed in field training sites and subsequently 
enter into full-time employment. 

The Special Needs Service Booklet, describing the 
Chapter 766 process and services provided by the school 
department, is available at the McKay and Adams 
Libraries and at the Special Education Office. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

The Community Education Department is now in its 
fourth year and has continued to grow and expand. 

The Fall Evening Adult Education Program was the 
largest ever with over 1000 people taking Adult Education 
courses and programs for Northeastern University, Mid- 
dlesex Community College and Lesley College. 

Chelmsford's childcare programs are administered by 
Community Education and include an Extended Day Pro- 
gram (7:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M.) for school age children, 
a preschool for 3 and 4 year olds, and a full day 
Kindergarten. The number of students in each program 
is continuing to grow and a state grant proposal has been 



written to conduct a Childcare Needs Assessment this 
spring. 

All scheduling of the use of facilities of our schools is 
done in the Office of Community Education. Almost every 
building has evening activities on a daily basis and often 
on weekends. 

Summer School, 1986 serviced almost 600 students from 
over 20 sending schools. 

Community Education continues to oversee 43 out-of- 
town tuition students, system-wide fundraising and public 
relations. 

We are quite proud that our Administrative Assistant 
Mrs. Edith Stinson was recognized by the Massachusetts 
Association of Adult and Continuing Education this fall 
by being given the State Award for Outstanding Service 
in the area of Community Education. 

The Office of Community Education is pleased with its 
accomplishments and the support that the town has given 
to its various programs. All programs continue to be self- 
supporting, and this year $50,000 will be given back to 
the town to reduce the school budget. 

IN CONCLUSION: 

The School Committee recognizes that 1987 will be a 
year of major decision-making. Proposition 2VS> has made 
an impact on all communities in Massachusetts and 
Chelmsford is no exception. As we plan for the future, our 
concern regarding the economy of the town, state, and na- 
tion emphasizes the need of total commitment from all 
facets of the community in order to guarantee the best use 
of the tax dollars and still continue our Quest For Quality 
for the betterment of the Chelmsford School System. 

Sincere thanks are once again extended to the town of- 
ficials and boards, to the school personnel, to the parent- 
teacher organizations, to the School Improvement Coun- 
cils, school volunteer workers, and to the citizens for their 
cooperation and assistance this past year. 

The School Committee wishes to extend its deep ap- 
preciation to the following staff members for their years 
of loyal and meritorious service, and who have retired this 
past year. 

Priscilla McAndrew Executive Secretary to 

Superintendent 
Christine Adams English Teacher, Chelmsford 

High School 
Viola Cormier Teacher Aide, Chelmsford 

High School 
Helen McKeon Library Assistant, Parker 

School 
Ivy Ridlon Assistant to Director of Food 

Service 
John Masarik Custodian, McCarthy School 

Submitted by: William F. Mullin 
Acting Superintendent of Schools 



138 




Chelmsford Sewer Commissioners 

Chairman John P. Emerson, Jr. (Center); Vice Chairman Jean Organ and Clerk Barry B. 
Balan — signing second largest grant issued under State Lateral Sewer Construction Grants 
from the State Department of Enviromental Quality Engineering in the amount of 
$2,606,474 on June 25, 1986. 



REPORT OF THE SEWER COMMISSION 

The following is the Annual Report for the Chelmsford 
Sewer Commission for the Year 1986. 

The Chelmsford Sewer Commission was notified by the 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on August 27, 1986 
that the proposed multi-phased sewering program will not 
be significantly detrimental to the environment. This Fin- 
ding of No Significant Impact (FNSI) now assures that the 
Town's extensive sewer construction projects will be eligi- 
ble for state and federal funding. 

With the completion of design plans and specifications 
for the Phase I -A sewer program in North Chelmsford, the 
Sewer Commission applied for and received a state lateral 
sewer construction grant from the State DEQE — Division 
of Water Pollution Control on June 25, 1986. This grant 
in the amount of $2,606,474 is the second largest grant 
issued under this funding program. The Town was virtually 
assured of receiving the grant due to the North Chelmsford 
Project's high priority ranking as compared to similar pro- 
jects across the state. 

With the acquisition of all required permits and land 
and rights-of-way needed prior to construction, two (2) 
North Chelmsford sewer construction contracts were adver- 
tised for public bid. The bids for Contracts 85-3 and 85-4 
were opened by the Sewer Commission on November 18 
and November 20, 1986 respectively. The successful bid- 
ders and the contract amounts are as follows: 



Contract Contractor 

85-3 Fantoni Company, Inc. 
Framingham, MA 



85-4 



P. Gioioso & Sons, 
Hyde Park, MA 



Inc. 



Contract 
Amount 

$1,094,440.00 



$1,063,709.19 



The Commission was extremely pleased with the results 
of the initial sewer contract bid process. Eighteen (18) con- 
tractors submitted bids on Contract 85-3, and fifteen (15) 
contractors bid on Contract 85-4. The competition resulted 
in contract prices approximately ten percent less than the 
engineer's estimate for the work. Due to the onset of frozen 
ground conditions, work on these contracts will begin in 
March, 1987 when asphalt plants are in operation. 

The remaining three (3) contracts in North Chelmsford 
will be advertised in early 1987 when the Town receives fun- 
ding for the Southwell Field Pumping Station and the 
North Chelmsford Interceptor Sewer Project. Work on all 
five contracts which span the North Chelmsford area from 
Tyngsborough to Lowell will be ongoing in June, 1987. 



The Commimssion also successfully negotiated an 
amended intermunicipal agreement for wastewater treat- 
ment and disposal with the City of Lowell, and signed the 
Agreement on September 5, 1986. In September, 1986, the 
Sewer Commission turned over a check in the amount of 
$850,000 to the City in accordance with the Agreement. 
This Agreement gives the Town of Chelmsford the right 



139 



to long-term use of the City's wastewater collection, 
transmission and treatment facilities. 

With regard to the Chelmsford Center Interceptor Sewer 
Project, the design is essentially complete. Upon receipt 
of the prerequisite permits and state and federal funding 
in early 1987, construction of the Katrina Road Pumping 
Station, Interceptor Sewers and Force Main will begin in 
mid-1987. 

Construction of the sewers that will serve the "Golden 
Triangle" or more precisely the Chelmsford Center In- 
dustrial Sewer District (CCISD), is also slated for construc- 
tion in the spring of 1987. The District Commissioners have 
worked diligently to implement this essential sewer project. 

Recognizing the impact of the sewer construction on the 
residents as well as the Sewer Commission staff, our office 
has been diligently developing rules and regulations, per- 
mitting fee structures, licensing requirements, and sewer 
assessments and a user charge system. Many of these issues 
received voter approval at the September 25, 1986 Special 
Town Meeting. 

In response to the added work load, the Sewer Commis- 
sion now has a part-time senior clerk, Michelle LaHaise, 
in addition to Evelyn L. Newman, Department Assistant. 
A full-time Sewer Superintendent will be hired during 1987 
to manage the system on a daily basis. 

Now that the construction of the first phase of sewer con- 
struction is imminent, the Sewer Commission will be ac- 
tively seeking local funding to continue with the sewer 
construction program in the Town Center. Recognizing that 
the state grant funding program restricts all towns to lateral 
sewer grants every two years, the Commission is now work- 
ing to maximize the grant funding expected in mid-1988. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Jean R. Organ, Vice Chairman 

Barry B. Balan, Clerk 



Balance as of June 30, 1986 $ 4,889.611.00 

Breakdown of Balance as of June 30, 1986: 

Cash in banks' $ 3,909,110.00 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 248.604.00 

Non-Revenue Funds" 731,897.00 

TOTAL $ 4,889,611.00 

•includes money market fund accts. 
**these funds are the unexpended proceeds from bond sales. 

This past year saw a tremendous increase in the number 
of parcels to be billed, as condo construction and conver- 
sions flourished. We now bill over 16,000 parcels semi- 
annually. Auto excise tax bills now exceed 30,000 per year, 
not counting second notices for late bills. The demands 
for tax certificates increased dramatically as many home- 
owners were re-financing their properties due to the decline 
in home mortgage interest rates. 

All these factors have led to the increase in part-time 
hours worked by seasonal staff & the addition of a new staff 
member, Judith Olsson, who works exclusively on the 
preparing of all tax certificates for passings. 

We have successfully foreclosed on some lots of land for 
unpaid taxes, and have managed to get them back on the 
tax rolls through sales to abutters or other interested parties. 

We suspended numerous drivers licenses for failure to 
pay excise taxes. 

We will be asking the Townspeople to approve a local 
by-law whereby the Board of Selectmen can revoke licenses 
issued if the licensee is in arrears on personal property taxes 
for a period in excess of eighteen months to two years. 

With bond sales pending, all uncollected funds must be 
aggressively sought out. The rating that the Town borrows 
at is influenced by the amount of uncollected funds on the 
tax rolls. Hence, I will continue to devote much time and 
effort to reducing unpaid accounts to a bare minimum (less 
than 01% for each fiscal year from 1984 through 1986). 

Respectfully submitted 

James R. Doukszewicz 
Treasurer/Tax Collector 



OFFICE OF 
THE TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR 

DEPT. MEMBERS: 

James R. Doukszewicz, Treasurer/Tax Collector 
Florence M. Ramsay, Asst. Treasurer 
Margaret M. Mullen, Asst. Tax Collector 
Lorraine Parkhurst, Payroll Co-ordinator 
Donna Rogers, Sr. Clerk, Med. Ins., Dept. Rcpts. 
Bettie A. Osborne, Jr. Clerk, Accts. Payable 
Lois Conlon, Sr. Clerk (part-time), Data Entry 
Judith Olsson, Part-time Clerk, Municipal lien cert. 

Balance as of July 1, 1985 $ 4.922,085.00 

Receipts through June 30, 1986 58,618.877.00 

Paid out on warrants (58,651,351.00) 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 

Ernest F. Day Term Expires 1987 

Board of Selectmen Executive Secretary 

Bernard F. Lynch Term Expires 1987 

Howard W Redfern, Jr. Resigned November, 1986 

Town Counsel 

James M. Harrington, Esquire Term Expires 1987 

Police Chief 

Raymond P. McKeon Term Expires 1987 



140 



Deputy Police Chiefs 
Pennryn D. Fitts James C. Greska 

Fire Chief 

Frederick H. Reid Resigned April, 1987 

Deputy Fire Chief 
James A. Sousa 

Cemetery Superintendent 

George E. Baxendale Term Expires 1987 

Park Superintendent 

Donald P. Gray Term Expires 1987 

Director of Public Health 

Richard J. Day Term Expires 1987 

Assistant Director of Public Health 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1987 

Board of Health Physician 

Michael J. Dean, M.D. Term Expires 1987 

Town Nurse 
Judith Dunigan Term Expires 1987 

Town Engineer 

James E. Pearson Term Expires 1987 

Assistant Town Engineer 

Anthony Ma Term Expires 1987 

Superintendent of Streets 

Harold E. Gray Term Expires 1987 

Inspector of Animals 

Dr. Martin A. Gruber Term Expires 1987 

Building Inspector 

Anthony Zagzoug Term Expires 1987 

Ronald W. Wetmore Resigned March, 1986 

Local Inspector 

Milton H. Kinney Term Expires 1987 

Bruce H. Clark Resigned March, 1986 

Wiring Inspector 

Francis E. Cunningham Term Expires 1987 

Gas Inspector 

Neal C. Stanley Term Expires 1987 

Plumbing Inspector 

William H. Shedd Term Expires 1987 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira Term Expires 1987 

Council on Aging Director 
Kathleen M. Robinson Term Expires 1987 



Superintendent of Public Buildings 

William W. Edge 

Veterans' Agent 
Mary K. McAuliffe Term Expires 1987 

Dog Officer 

Franklin Warren Term Expires 1987 

William Shedd Resigned May, 1986 

Part-time Dog Officers 

Laura Lavoie Karen Pierro 

Insect Pest Control Officer 

Richard J. Day Term Expires 1987 

Hazardous Waste Coordinator 

Richard J. Day Term Expires 1987 

Assistant Town Clerk 
Elizabeth L. Delaney 

Assistant Treasurer 
Florence Ramsay 

Assistant Town Accountant 

Mary Villare 

Administrative Assistant to Executive Secretary 
Judith E. Carter 

Sewer Department Assistant 

Evelyn L. Newman 

Board of Selectmen's Clerk 

Beth A. Gibbs 

Planning Board Clerk 

Christine Gleason 

Board of Appeals Clerk 
Conservation Commission Clerk 

Marjorie Hennessy 

Recreation Commission Clerk 

Lorraine Murphy 

Finance Committee Clerk 

Sharon Galpin Resigned 

Personnel Board Clerk 

Cable TV Commission Clerk 

Rent Control Board Clerk 

Elizabeth Kopicko 

Historical Commission Clerk 
Historic District Commission Clerk 

Mary Caffelle 

Highway Department Foremen 

Pearl Koulas Arthur Deschaine Frederick Greenwood 



141 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1986 



Cash: 
General : 
In Banks 
Interest Bearing 

Federal Revenue Sharing: 
Interest Bearing 

Non-Revenue: 
Interest Bearing 

Due From Stabilization Fund 

Due From Cemetery Trust Fund 

Due From Conservation Trust Fund 

Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes: 

Real Estate 1986 
Real Estate 1985 
Real Estate 1984 

Personal Property 1986 
Personal Property 1985 
Personal Property 1984 
Personal Property 1983 

Motor Vehicle Excise 1986 
Motor Vehicle Excise 1985 
Motor Vehicle Excise 1984 



$2,140,284 
1,768,826 



$4,889,611 

425,405 

15,000 

62.000 



1,162,415 
106.004 
15.636 

1,171 
9,257 
8,094 
3.661 

201.272 
34.827 
15.358 



Snow and Ice Removal 

Overdrawn Overlay Accounts: 
Levy of 1983 

Underestimated Assessments: 
Special Education 
Regional Transit 

Revenue: 

Appropriations Voted for Fiscal Year 1987 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Warrants Payable 

Notes Payable: 

Bond Anticipation 

Payroll Deductions 

Guarantee Deposits 

Tailings — Unclaimed Checks 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Sale of Real Estate 

Excess — Sale Land Low Value 

Agency: 

Dog License Fees 
Tax Title Fees 

Gifts from Individuals: 
Council on Aging 
Library 
Recreation 
Health 

Federal and State Grants: 
Revenue Sharing 
Department of HUD 
Dept. of Community Affairs 
Dept. of Elder Affairs 



Tax Titles 


29,928 




Dept. of Public Works 


Tax Possessions 


26,098 


56,026 


Secretary of State 
Mass. Budget Bureau 


Water Liens 1986 


6,856 




Div. -Water Pollution Control 


Water Liens 1985 


442 


7,298 


Public Law 874 

Dept. of Education Chap. 188 


Departmental: 






Other School Grants 


Off Duty Work Details 


14,246 






Public Buildings (Rent) 


22 




Revolving Funds: 


Cemetery 


9,485 


23,753 


School 
Recreation 


State Aid to Highways 




189,146 


Cultural Council 
Outside Detail 


oans Authorized: 






Police Special Investigation 


Sewer Construction 


9,915.000 






School Building Improvements 


1,080,300 




Loans Authorized and Unissued 


Capital Improvements 


2,295,520 






Conservation Land Purchase 


863,000 


14,153,820 


Reserve Fund — Overlay Surplus 


ransfers Authorized from: 






Overlay Reserved for Abatements: 


Federal Revenue Sharing 




372,110 


Levy of 1986 
Levy of 1985 


iverdrawn Appropriation: 






Levy of 1985 



Appropriation Balances Forward 

Construction Account: 
Accrued Interest 
School Building Improvement! 



3,786 




Sewer Plans and Design 


2.372 


6,158 


Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 
Motor Vehicle Excise 




33,611,270 


Tax Titles & Possessions 
Water Liens 
Departmental 
Aid to Highways 



Overestimated Assessments: 
County Tax 

Surplus Revenue: 
Restricted 
Unrestricted 



2.100,300 
288,786 
4,953 
18,123 
15,237 
82,767 
28,456 



3,227 




3,556 




242 


7,135 


248,604 




58,349 




310 




977 




318,029 




18,663 




2,927 




92,744 




12,256 




91,109 




6,163 


850,131 


152,028 




2,108 




4,267 




2,362 




2,685 


163,450 




12,053,520 




68,178 


251,357 




172,032 




58,056 


481,445 




1,247,719 


670 




490,821 




240,406 


731,897 


251,457 




56,026 




7,298 




23,753 




189,146 


527,680 



852,000 
1,419,400 



142 



Appropriate 
Revenue 
Transfers 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



s Voted from Revenue Sharing 
Control FY 1987: 



33,611,270 
74,625 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit: 
General: 



Serial Loans: 

Inside Debt Limit: 
General: 



Outside Debt Limit: 
General : 



Serial Loans: 

Outside Debt Limit: 
General: 
Schools 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



Trust and Investment Funds: 
Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of Treasurer 

In Custody of, Library Trustees 

In Custody of Selectmen 

In Custody of Veterans 

Emergency Fund Committee 



$1,489,818 

108,681 

858 

11,358 



In Custody of Treasurer: 

Geo. W. Barris— Vamey Playground 

Conservation Fund 

Wright Reservation 

Stabilization Fund 

Insurance Sinking Fund 

Cemetery Funds: 

Geo. W. Barris Memorial 

Perpetual Care 

Adam Emerson 

Christopher Roby 

Vileata S. Douglas 

Baptist Pond Cemetery 



$4,833 
64,519 
3,341 
875,990 
65,405 

9,650 

432.508 

1,119 

15,051 

16,137 

1,176 



In Custody of Library Trustees: 
Amos F. Adams 
Geo. W. Barris 
Frances Clark 
Clement Fund 
Albert H. Davis 
Frederick B. Edwards 
Nathan B. Edwards 
Victor E. Edwards 
Adam Emerson 
Ora Flint 
George Memorial 
Thomas P. Proctor 
Serlina Richardson 
Joseph E. Warren 
Gertrude Wright 
Aaron George — Cemetery Fund 



31,031 

260 

9,039 

27,961 

1,236 

4,195 

375 

2,051 

252 

1,872 

3,171 

19,351 

673 

287 

4,019 

2,908 



In Custody of Selectmen: 

Emma Gay-Varney Playground 

In Custody of Veterans Emergency Fund Committee: 
Veterans Emergency Fund 



Cash — In Custrody of Treasurer 



EDUCATIONAL COLLABORATIVE BOARD FUND 
SEC. 4-E CHAPTER 40 GENERAL LAWS 



Unexpended Balance 



DEBT STATEMENT 



Bond — Note Issue 

Westland- Harrington Schools 
Byam School 

TOTALS 



Interest 


Outstanding 


Payments 


Outstanding 


Principal 


Interest 


Rate 


6-30-85 


1986 


6-30-86 


Due 1987 


Due 1987 


4.30 


380,000 


155,000 


225,000 


155.000 


9.675 


6.00 


500.000 


100,000 


400,000 


100.000 


21,000 



143 



FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING 

Fiscal Year 1986 



Cash Balance July 1, 1985 
Plus Receipts: 



Entitlements Received 


573,243 


Interest Earned 


18,129 


:ss Authorized Appropriations: 




Police Salaries 


300,000 


Fire Salaries 


300,000 


Highway — St. Resurfacing 


100,000 


Recreation — Southwell Field 


36,444 



CHANGES IN SURPLUS REVENUE 



alancejuly 1, 1985 
Deductions: 

Audit Adjustments 
Tax Titles Taken 
Appropriations STM 1-27-1 
Appropriations STM 5-12-i 
Reduce Tax Rate 1986 



Unrestricted 

Restricted (Reduced 1987 Tax Rate) 



General Revenue: 
Taxes: 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

Farm Animal Excise 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Tax Title Redemptions 

Lieu of Taxes — State Property 

Lieu of Taxes— Veteran Abatements 

Elderly Exemptions 



Fines and Permits: 
Court Fines 

Permits, Fees & Licenses 
Alcoholic 



Grants and Gifts: 
County: 
Dog Fund 
Total Grants from County 

Federal Government: 
Public Law 874 
Revenue Sharing 
Com. Dev. Program (HUD) 
EDA Energy Grant 



State: 

Aid to Education 

School Bldg. Assistance 

School Lunch Program 

Tuition— Trans. State Wards 

School Transportation 

Aid to Public Libraries 

Highway — Chapter 81 

Highway and Transit Development 

Local Aid Fund 

Veterans Benefits 

Dept. of Elder Affairs 

School Grant Programs 

Div. of Water Pollution Control 



63,065 
41.023 



Additions: 




Tax Titles Redeemed 


212.796 


Additional Tax Commitments 


819 


Excess Estimated Receipts 


500,957 


Unexpected Appropriations 


283,830 



$1,419,400 
852.000 



633,196 


479,571 


18,334,048 


19,222,556 


636 


533 


1,423,151 


1,828.348 


147.442 


212,796 


3,329 


12,378 


s 9,126 


9,967 


31,056 


29.903 


20.581,984 


21,796,052 


158,401 


155,427 


459,709 


423.516 


26.515 


28,030 


644.625 


606,973 


2.959 


3,272 


2,959 


3,272 


14.417 


11,226 


585,633 


573,243 


21,644 





83,153 





704,847 


584.469 


4.234,202 


4,168.544 


194,995 


128,562 


103,109 


232,741 


44,950 


8,501 


531,150 


497,853 


24,626 


24,624 


135,773 


138,929 


148,672 


148,672 


2,684.457 


3,145,938 


23,749 


36,239 


10,066 


5.901 


315,208 


305.932 





181,807 



Arts Lottery Council 


12,304 


12,792 


Chapter 90 Reimbursement 


361,277 


178,068 


Residential School Tuition 





113,480 


Sec. of State— Elections 


23.381 





Chapter 90 Construction Grant 


99,771 


158,845 


Other State Grants 


46,113 


262,811 




8,993,803 


9.750,239 


Individuals: 






Library — Carriage House 


2.645 


3,243 


Library— Purchase of Books 


2,670 


4,061 


Council on Aging 


2,975 


3,375 


Board of Health 


500 


800 


School Department 


50 


1,800 


Recreation Commission 


542 


2,464 


Cultural Council 


3,728 
13.110 







15,743 


Lowell Regional Transit Authority 


23,105 


23,391 


Departmental Receipts: 






Selectmen 


4,163 


675 


Treasurer/Collector 


23,482 


50,056 


Town Clerk 


3,742 


4,992 


Police 


22,352 


26,166 


Public Buildings 


29,605 


31,450 


Highway 


1,104 


370 


Dog Officer 


98 


953 


Veterans Benefits 


6,252 


2,352 


Misc. 


2,199 


80,613 


Sale of Town Property 


28,000 


50,000 


Recreation Revolving Fund 


1,725 


1,561 




122,722 


249,188 


School: 






Cafeteria Lunch Sales 


637,389 


539,356 


Tuition, Rents & Misc. 


289,249 


352,825 


Athletic Programs 


63,485 


51,650 




990,123 


943,831 


Library: 






Fines 


13,909 


13,039 


Cemetery: 




Sale of Lots and Graves 


11,485 


11,820 


Internments 


16,445 


17,565 


P/C Bequests 


21,130 
49,060 


23,880 




53,265 


Total Departmental Receipts 


1,175,814 


1,259,323 


Municipal Indebtedness: 






Anticipation of Revenue 


10,500,000 


13,000,000 


Note — School Renovations 


715,000 





School Computer 


133,965 





Other Temporary Notes 


1.025,378 


1,803,595 




12,374,343 


14,803,595 


Taxes 


130,499 


113,046 


Deposits 


245,968 


153,457 


Fedl. Revenue Sharing 


24,477 


18,130 


Misc. 


6,972 


12,064 




407,916 


296,697 


Unpaid Warrants — Current Year 


328,435 


382,893 


Refunds: 


79,467 


13,029 


Agency, Trust & Investment: 






Payroll Withholdings 


7,496,304 


8,229,191 


Cemetery P/C Interest 


37,936 


52,260 


Licenses Due County 


6,552 


6,659 


Licenses Due State 


1,750 


1,887 


Library Trust Funds 


4,920 


11,138 


Water District Liens 


4,540 


6.215 


Stabilization Fund 


66,229 


364,076 


Outside Detail 


245,364 


247,462 


Merrimack Education Center 


109,552 


120.507 


Tailings 


1,226 


7,400 


Performance Bonds 


6,327 


3,000 


Other Trust Funds 


3,000 


4,950 


Sale of Tax Possession Property 





28.456 




7,983,700 


9.083,201 



144 



Total Receipts 

Cash Balance On Hand July 1, 

Total 



53,314,108 
5,624,732 



58,618,877 
4,922,085 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Government: 
Moderator 
Selectmen 
Accounting 
Treasurer/Collector 
Assessors 
Town Clerk 
Public Buildings 
Law 

Elections 
Registrars 

Finance Committee 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Personnel Board 
Conservation Commission 
Historical Commission 
Historic District Commission 
Constable 

Council on Aging/Town Aide 
Town Celebration Committee 
Town Engineer 
Total General Government 

Public Safety: 

Police Department: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
Purchase Cruisers 
Mutual Aid 
Purchase Radios 
Equipment and Repairs 
Total Police Department 

Fire Department: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
Equipment and Repairs 

Total Fire Department 

Misc. Protection: 
Hydrant Service 
Tree Warden 
Insect Pest Control 
Inspection 
Dog Officer 
Animal Inspector 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Civilian Defense 



Public Health: 

Salaries and Expense 
Landfill Closure 
Mosquito Control 
Hazardous Materials 



Sewer Commission: 
Salaries and Expenses 
Professional Fees 
Sewer Plans & Design 



Highway Depa 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Waste Coillection 
Snow and Ice Removal 
Sidewalks 

Purchase of Equipment 
Drainage Construction 
Resurface Streets 
Chapter 90 Construction 



Street Lighting: 



300 


300 


104.210 


123,578 


79,615 


87,404 


153,309 


179,918 


175,711 


191,158 


86,195 


97,638 


104,791 


115,401 


63,781 


69,403 


25,135 


13,171 


27,587 


31,080 


1.652 


2,189 


56,665 


16,212 


4,989 


5,177 


584 


650 


6,546 


10,437 


241 


1,137 


1,316 


1,612 


150 


130 


75,869 


90,561 


458 


236 


39,914 


51,162 


1,009,018 


1,088,554 


1,699,555 


1,962,577 


252,842 


220,627 


49,593 


60,000 


1,960 


2,000 


1,799 


6,000 


9,409 


10,156 


2,015,158 


2,261,360 


1.938,975 


1,968,667 


98,089 


111,570 


97,245 


293.224 


2,134,309 


2,373,461 


74,900 


78,350 


10,881 


21,708 


11,808 


12,012 


142,535 


163,989 


31,349 


48,337 


1,400 


1,400 


2,000 


2,080 


3,332 


2,799 


278,205 


330,675 


100,305 


111,883 


11,573 


9,917 


8,250 


8,531 


2,438 


5,693 


122.566 


136,024 


7,776 


32,368 


62,582 


21,452 


207,057 


661,600 


277,415 


715.420 


481.163 


502,550 


300,473 


379,733 


480,454 


1,014,652 


320,123 


317,853 


16,413 


3,400 


37,535 


147,982 


106,516 


15,874 


320,621 


208,310 


268,569 


226,328 


2,331.867 


2.816.682 


149,547 


130,853 



Veterans Benefits: 
Salaries and Expense 
Cash and Material Grants 



Libraries: 

Wages and Salaries 

Expense 

Books and Periodicals 

Carriage House Renovatic 

Gifts from Individuals 

Automation of Records 



Parks and Recreation: 
Parks 

Varney Playground 
Recreation Commission 
Edwards Memorial Beach 



Insurance: 

Property Liability & All Types 
Chapter 32B 



Expenses 

Purchase Band Uniforms 

Purchase Truck 



School Revolving Funds: 
Cafeteria 
Athletics 
Adult Education 
Civic Activities 
Loss of Books 

Out of Town Student Tuition 
Summer School 
Child Care 
Grant Accounts 



Regional Vocational School: 



School Renovations 
School Computer Purchase 



Cemeteries: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
Improvement & Development 
Beautification P/C Transfer 
Sprinkler Repair— Trust Transfer 



Unclassified: 
Memorial Day 
Town Clock 

Town & Finance Com. Reports 
Mental Health Program 
Elder Services of Merr. Valley 
NMAC Assessment 
Unemployment Benefits 
Cultural Council 
Cultural Council Revolving 
Cable TV Commission 
Construct Sr. Citizen Center 
Court Judgement 
Vinal Sq. Rehab. Project (HUD) 
Bills of Prior Years 

Medical Expenses Retired Police and Fire 
Mobile Home Rent Control Board 
Traffic Study — Chelmsford St. 
HUD Repayment Account 
North School Demolition 
Design Resource Recovery Facility 
Preliminary Project Studies 



42,627 


47,251 


62,236 


45,538 


104,863 


92.789 


303.814 


333,610 


56.999 


68,833 


73,397 


84,040 


2,475 


2,890 


2,459 


3,613 


10,161 


592 


449,305 


493,578 


41.414 


39,358 


4,965 


5,155 


48,325 


80.109 


703 


760 


95,407 


125.382 


320,930 


523,670 


832.367 


930,745 


1.153.297 


1,454,415 


13,313,600 


14,425,589 


3,629,062 


3,639,556 





10,000 





16,777 


16,942,662 


18.091.922 


750,510 


784,157 


61,755 


53,193 


89,358 


94.552 


40,680 


35,016 


5,898 


5,652 


37,537 


57,397 


49,183 


37,844 


56,556 


100,699 


186.050 


429,771 


1.277,527 


1, 598, 281 


471.798 


536.337 


608,629 


892.668 


130,527 





739,156 


892,668 


124,378 


144,693 


33,872 


25,282 


8,300 


21,800 


7,451 


4,875 


212 


2,776 


174,213 


199,426 


863 


998 


710 


597 


6,565 


5,042 


8,695 


8,695 


1,800 


1,800 


8,422 


8,631 


63.302 


33,914 


81 


24 


14,035 


12,849 


2,992 


3,099 





18,754 


24,040 





26,452 








1,022 


3,558 


4,066 





304 


30,900 


17,700 





14,122 


21,776 








26,531 


2.755 


10,750 


216,946 


168.898 



145 



Agency, Trust & Investment: 

Fees & Licenses Due State & County 

Payroll Deductions 

Retirement— Pension Expense 

State and County Assessments 

Cemetery P/C Bequests 

Tax Levy Refunds 

Performance Bonds 

Misc. Trust Funds 

Water District Liens 

Outside Details 

Merrimack Education Center 

Tailings 

Misc. Refunds 



Interest— Loans: 
Anticipation Loans 
Bonded Debt 



Principal — Loans: 

Anticipation of Revenu 
Bonded Debt 
Short Term Notes 



Previous Year: 



Total Disb 
Cash Balance 



i Hand June 30 



12,834 


5,033 


7.889.129 


8,285,810 


823.106 


858,851 


633.293 


511,904 


20.730 


23,330 


268.737 


174,139 


6,337 


3,000 


4,920 


20,688 


4,540 


6,053 


234,726 


237,278 


109.552 


120,507 


3,342 


50 


650 


920 


10,011.896 


10,247,563 


233,886 


243,255 


56,370 


43,340 


290,256 


286,595 


12,500,000 


13,000.000 


265,000 


255,000 


843,642 


1,027.033 


13,608,642 


14,282,033 


162,702 


328,435 


54,016,755 


58,651,351 


4.922,085 


4.889,611 


58,938.840 


1) '1540. 962 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, MA 

Dear Board Members: 

I hereby submit my report of the Highway Department 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1986: 

The 1986 year was a very productive year for the Highway 
Department. Ample funds were voted into the budget and 
a full schedule of work was completed. 

I would like to commend the members of the Highway 
Department for their accomplishments during the past 
year. The Department was shorthanded much of the time, 
but with the determination and diligence of the person- 
nel, work schedules were completed. 

I wish to express my appreciation to all town officials 
and the various Departments for the fine cooperation given 
to me and the Highway Department. Also, a "thank you" 
to all the residents who called and wrote to me expressing 
their gratitude. 

Asphalt Resurfacing Account 

Bituminous Concrete Type 1-1 was used to resurface the 
following streets: 

Boston Road (From Charlesgate Road to 

Harvey Road) 
Parkhurst Road (From Route 3 overpass to 

Lowell City Line) 
Groton Road (From Route 3 overpass to Main 

Street) 



(From Route 3 overpass to 
Loiselle Lane) 

(From Old Westford Road to 
Locke Road) 

(From Lowell Connector to Mar- 
shall Street) 
(Entire Road) 

(Acton Road to Thornton Lane) 
(Entire Road) 
(Entire Road) 

(Completely rebuilt and 2 " of 
binder and 1 " of bitminous top 
was applied. 

was completely rebuilt, widened, 
and drainage installed. Also 
2V£ " of bituminous binder 
applied. 



Liquid asphalt was used to make a cold asphalt mix and 
to seal various streets. Approximately 15,000 tons of cold 
asphalt mix was manufactured and applied to the follow- 
ing streets: 



Main Street 

Westford Street 

Riverneck Road 

Penni Lane 
Purceli Drive 
Kenwood Street 
Linden Street 
Nadine Road 

Monmouth Street 



Putnam Ave. 
East Purnam Ave. 
First Street 
Second Street 
Third Street 
York Avenue 
Rivermeadow Dr. 
Marion Street 
Drexel Drive 
Berkshire Rd. 
Dennison Road 
Robin Hill Rd. 
Proctor Rd. 

Tuttle Road 
Frederick Road 
Edgelawn Ave. 
M arose Avenue 
Miner Avenue 
Roosevelt Street 
Columbia Street 



(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(to Bit. Cone. Surface) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Acton Rd. to Adirondack Rd.) 

(190 Proctor Rd. to Carlisle 

Line) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 

(Entire length) 



Chapter 90, Construction Account 

The Chapter 90 account was used on the reconstruction 
of Westford Street and Acton Road. 

Westford Street was reconstructed from Abbott Lane to 
Locke Road, approximately 2500 feet. 

Acton Road was reconstructed from Byam Road to 
Bartlett Street, approximately 3000 feet. 

Drainage Account 

Drainage projects completed in 1986 are as follows: 

Crooked Spring Rd. 40 : 30" R.C. pipe — two 

headwalls 



146 



Third Street 
Knob Hill Road 
Acton Road 
Purcell Drive 
Stevens Street 
Pine Hill Road 



Nadine Road 
Park Road 



Penni Lane 



Manwell Road 
Warren Avenue 

Mill Road 

Graniteville Rd. (#130) 

Monmouth St. @ 
Riverneck Road 



Ruthellen & Raymond 

Rds. 

Domenic & Vincent Sts. 

Riverneck Road 

Middlesex Turnpike 

Kenwood Street 

Carriage Drive 
Clarissa Road 
Riverneck Road 

Riverneck Road 

Riverneck Road 

Robin Hill Road 
Mill Road 



165 : 12" Aluminum pipe, 
two catch basins 
10 : 8" Steel pipe, one catch 
basin 

20-12" Aluminum pipe, one 
45° elbow 

168-12" PVC plastic pipe, 
one catch basin 
48 ; 6" Aluminum pipe, one 
catch basin 

140-15" Steel coated pipe; 
862-12" Steel coated pipe, 3 
catch basins 
350 : 10" Aluminum pipe 
500 : 12" Steel coated pipe; 
128-12" R.C. pipe, 3 catch 
basins 

295a2" Perforated 
Aluminum pipe; 315 : 12" 
PVC plastic pipe, 1 
manhole, 3 catch basins 
1 catch basin, regrade 
120 : 12" steel coated pipe, 1 
catch basin 

130-12" PVC plastic pipe, 1 
catch basin 

60-15" Aluminum pipe, 1 
manhole 

279-12" PVC pipe— man- 
hole; 169a2" PVC plastic 
pipe; 395-12" R.C. Plastic 
pipe, 5 catch basins, 4 
manholes 

Repair broken culvert 

Clean drainage swale 

Repair culvert, 10-18" 

coated steel pipe 

Replace root filled pipe, 

100 : 12" R.C. pipe 

40-12" PVC plastic pipe, 1 

catch basin 

1 catch basin 

1 catch basin 

100 : 12" aluminum pipe, 1 

catch basin 

60 : 12" steel coated pipe, 1 

catch basin 

48-18" R.C. pipe, 1 head 

wall, widen road, build 

slope 

80 : 12" aluminum pipe, 1 

catch basin 

100;i2" PVC plastic pipe, 1 

catch basin 



The maintenance of all streets was carried out in the 
usual manner. This includes the street sweeping, basin 
cleaning, basin repairs, cleaning of culverts and easements 
along brooks, patching pot holes and washouts, erection 
of street signs, painting traffic lines and cross walks, guard 
rail repair, gravel roads, sanding, salting, snow plowing and 
snow removal, and other types of general maintenance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold Gray 
Supt. of Streets 

Highway Department Roster 

Superintendent of Streets 
Harold E. Gray 

Foremen 

Arthur G. Deschaine Frederick W. Greenwood 

Supervisor 
Pearl Koulas 

Grader Operator 

Arthur L. Newcomb 

Mechanics — Heavy Equipment 
Bobby Loyd John C. Ferreira, Jr. 

Engineering Equipment Operators 

Roy J. Costa Walter J. McLaughlin, Jr. 

David G. Harvey Richard J. Soucier 

Truck Drivers, Laborers 

Gary E. Beaulieu Stephen K. Harvey 

John J. Cronin Dennis J. Greenwood 

James T. Crotty Ernest A. Howland 

Robert I. Dearborn Joseph C. Oczkowski 

Frederick J. Dillon Anthony L. Sousa 
Lawrence J. Ferreira 

Laborers 

Leslie L. Dukeshire, Jr. Kenneth R. Burroughs 



147 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, MA 

Dear Board Members: 

I hereby submit my report for the Engineering Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1986. 

This was the second year of the Department s existence 
since its inception late in 1984. As was the case last year, 
the requests for engineering studies and review far out- 
numbered the time available for one engineer. Therefore, 
the most significant event this year was the hiring of addi- 
tional personnel. Anthony Ma, the Assistant Town 
Engineer, graduated from the University of Lowell in 1985 
with a degree in Civil Engineering and started work in 
September of this year. Sharon Galpin also joined the staff 
this year as a part-time clerk. 

The majority of the Town Engineer's time is spent review- 
ing plans for proposed subdivisions and site plans. Sub- 
divisions are reviewed for such things as proper geometric 
layout and proper drainage calculations and the effect on 
abutting property. Following Planning Board approval, we 
must closely monitor the construction of the roadway for 
conformance with Town standards. Site plans are review- 
ed for conformance with Town bylaws as they pertain to 
parking, traffic, drainage, etc. 

Other projects we were involved in this year were the 
design and construction layout of Monmouth Street, 
drainage improvements on Penni Lane, soccer fields off Mill 
Road, roadway improvements on Riverneck Road, and 
delineation of the Historic District boundaries. 

This year the department purchased a Xerox 2510 copier, 
and for the first time, copies of Town Assessors, Wetlands, 
Topographical, and Street layout plans are available to the 
general public at Town Hall. 

Plans for 1987 include an updated street index map 
which is long overdue, a town -wide drainage study and a 
design, and the purchase of an electronic transit and dis- 
tance measurement instrument. 



1986 has been a year of transition in the Building Depart- 
ment. Both the Inspector of Buildings, Ronald Wetmore 
and Local Inspector Bruce Clark left the Town in the 
Spring. I would like to thank them for leaving the Depart- 
ment in such fine condition. It has made my take over 
much easier and enjoyable. 

There was a slight decline in construction mainly due 
to the leveling off of Commercial and Industrial develop- 
ment. I do not forsee any further decline in growth in the 
coming years and expect approximately the same number 
of permits and monies to be collected in 1987. 

I wish to thank the Inspectors for their assistance in help- 
ing me adjust to the job and welcome Milton Kinney, the 
new Local Inspector. 

Special thanks are extended to the clerks, Mrs. Catherine 
R. Curran and Mrs. Karen Flynn for breaking me in and 
familiarizing me in the Office procedure. Their help has 
been immeasurable. 

Respectfully, 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 
Inspector of Buildings 

The following is a breakdown of the Permits issued for 
the year: 



PERMITS ISSUED 




TOTAL FEES 


1986 




COLLECTED 1986 


Building 


756 


$166,060.00 


Wire 


1024 


28,649.00 


Gas 


928 


13,628.00 


Plumbing 


864 


20,643.00 


Signs 


69 


2,280.00 


Cert, of Occupancy 


30 


520.00 


Cert, of Inspection 


106 


2,555.00 


Yard Sales 


176 


1,015.00 


Elevator 


3 


217.00 


Totals 


3956 


$235,567.00 



We would like to thank the other town departments for 
their assistance on many projects and their cooperation in 
developing this new department. 

Respectfully submitted, 



James E. Pearson, P.E. 
Town Engineer 



148 




FIRE DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Dear Board Members, 

On May 1, 1986 Chief Frederick H. Reid retired. Chief 
Reid served on the department for 31 years; twenty-one as 
chief. He was a dedicated leader who always had service 
to his community as his top priority. 

This has been a difficult year because several members 
of the department have served in temporary positions. All 
members of the department "rose to the occasion" and 
dispatched their duties in a commendable manner. 

Due to ongoing growth in our community, and changes 
in regulations and laws, the Fire Department is in need 



of expanded staff and changes in our organizational 
structure. 

Bids for the new Fire Department rescue truck and for 
the generator system for the Central Station have been 
received and implemented through Capital Planning. 

Many thanks to all town officials and employees for the 
excellent cooperation given to the Fire Department dur- 
ing the past year, and again congratulations and thanks 
to the men of the department for continuing to maintain 
the high standard of courage and ability that has been 
shown in the past. 

Very truly yours, 

Robert L. Hughes 
Fire Chief 



TOTAL 



No. of 
Alarms 



1641 



CHELMSFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT CALLS— 1986 

Bldg. Auto Mutual Outside Medical 

Aid 



70 



82 



12 



189 



437 



Misc. 



710 



False 



January 


107 


6 


9 


1 


8 


32 


49 


2 


February 


105 


5 


1 


2 


3 


38 


54 


2 


March 


137 


7 


7 


3 


40 


29 


45 


6 


April 


182 


2 


7 





58 


41 


63 


11 


May 


153 


7 


8 





20 


37 


68 


13 


June 


146 


5 


7 





5 


41 


82 


6 


July 


141 


3 


8 


1 


17 


32 


72 


8 


August 


129 


2 


6 


1 


5 


27 


71 


17 


September 


122 


6 


6 


2 


9 


26 


57 


16 


October 


147 


8 


7 





8 


60 


48 


16 


November 


140 


7 


8 





9 


38 


59 


19 


December 


132 


12 


8 


2 


7 


36 


42 


25 



141 



149 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Board of Selectmen 

Town Hall 

Billerica Road 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts 01824 

Dear Board Members: 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review, the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the year 1986. 

At the present time the department is made up of 52 
permanent men. 

Chief of Police 

Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Chief of Administration 
James C. Greska 

Deputy Chief of Operations 

Pennryn D. Fitts 



Armand J. Caron 



Captains 

Phillip N. Molleur 



John J. Mack 



Sergeants 
Leslie H. Adams William R. McAllister 

Steven A. Burns Raymond G. McCusker 

Lance R. Cunningham Francis X. Roark 
Robert M. Burns John O. Walsh 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
Paul E. Cooper 
Alan Cote 
Patrick W. Daley 
Bruce A. Darwin 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
Jared S. Finnegan 
James T. Finnegan 
William J. Floyd, III 
Joseph R. Gamache 
Francis P. Kelly 
Martin Kirkorian 
Roland E. Linstad 
Russell H. Linstad 
John M. McGeown, Jr 
Peter C. McGeown 
Debra Metcalf 



Karen M. Pierro 
Jo-Ann E. Roth 



Patrolmen 

James F. Midgley 
Brian F. Mullen 
Gail Mullen 
James F. Murphy 
Thomas A. Niemaszyk 
Timothy F. O'Connor 
John E. Redican 
Paul Richardson 
Chandler J. Robinson 
Edward M. Rooney 
E. Michael Rooney 
Michael W. Scott 
William S. Strobel 
Francis Teehan 
Robert J. Trudel 
Scott Ubele 
Eugene W. Walsh 
William R. Walsh 
Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 

Matrons 

Paula A. Rogers 
Barbara W. Gibb 



Junior Clerk 

Mary Jane Grant 

Custodian 

John P. Curran 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 

1985 1986 

Photocopying Machine 2,581,20 4,089.75 

Firearm Permits 1 ,251 ,00 1 ,064.00 

Bicycle Registrations 14.00 5.50 

Firearm Identification Cards 312.00 433.00 

Court Fines 158,401.00 155,427.50 

Photographs 690.00 388.00 

Police Detail Account 

Service Charge 9,988.00 10,330.02 

Miscellaneous 284.00 203.13 

Parking Fines 14,390.00 16,350.00 

Restitution 3,144.00 7,120.24 

Total Receipts returned to the 

Town 189 

ARRESTS 



340.20 195,411.14 



Principal Clerks 

Marie K. DiRocco Jo-Ann E. Roth 



1986 

Crimes Against Persons 31 

Crimes Against Property 1 02 

Crimes Against Public Order 341 

DISPOSITION OF CASES IN 1986 

Fines 199 

Placed on Probation 22 

Suspended Sentence and Placed on Probation 14 

Placed on File 24 

Not Guilty Finding 5 

Dismissed with Probable Cause 3 

Ordered to Pay Court Costs and Continued 

Without a Finding 5 

Committed to Youth Service Board 3 

Committed to M.C.I. Walpole 1 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 

Committed to M.C.I. Billerica 26 

Turned over to other out-of-town Police Depts. 

& Courts 55 

Cases Pending and Continued in the Courts 227 

Placed on Alcohol Safety Program 40 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

1985 1986 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 12,926 12,446 

Summons Served 461 637 

Licenses Suspended 130 137 

Accidents Reported 2,039 1,935 

Personal Injuries Reported 534 483 

Fatal Accidents 3 1 

Mileage of Cruisers 364,718 371,600 

Special Property Checks (Auxiliary 

Police) 7,800 8,200 

Station Lockups 656 636 

Citations Issued 5,168 4,081 

Parking Violations 1,519 1,492 

Doors and Windows Found Open 57 57 

Detoxification Unit 148 " 126 



150 



James J. Kerrigan retired from the Police Department 
after 28 years of service. Officer Kerrigan served in the 
criminal bureau as a detective for 20 years. 

The Chelmsford Police Department with 52 other sur- 
rounding cities and towns continued its Inservice Train- 
ing program at the Northeast Regional Police Institute 
located on the grounds of Tewksbury Hospital. Each of- 
ficer in our department will attend for one week to be 
upgraded in Criminal Law, Court Procedure, Officers Sur- 
vival, Evidence, Use of Force, Civil Liability, Crisis In- 
tervention, Stress & Sensitivity Training. Training and 
knowledge will continue to be our goal in 1986. 

At the present time 26 members of the Police Depart- 
ment have received college degrees to date, and 12 addi- 
tional officers are presently enrolled in degree colleges and 
universities. 

This year, as in the past several years, the Town was 
able to save several thousand dollars by purchasing new 
Police Cruisers through the Greater Boston Police Council. 

In a continuing effort to upgrade the quality of Police 
Service to the Town of Chelmsford, many officers attend- 
ed specialized training schools run by the Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice Training Council, to increase their exper- 
tise in the Law Enforcement Field. 

SCHOOLS ATTENDED IN 1986 



Rape Investigation 2 women - 


- 1 man 


Hazardous Material 


2 men 


Hazardous Waste 


1 man 


Field Sobriety Testing 7 men — 1 


woman 


Basic Dispatch 


2 men 


Advanced Accident Investigation 


3 men 


EMT Program 


1 man 


First Responder 


1 man 


Contagious Disease & Drug Abuse 


2 men 


Collection & Preservation of Evidence 


4 men 


Criminal Investigators School 


1 man 


Advanced Drug Investigation 


1 man 


Interview & Interrogation 


1 man 


Rape Prevention 2 


women 


Identi-Kit 


1 man 


Basic Accident Investigation 


6 men 


Civil Liability 


2 men 


Sergeant School (in-service training) 


1 man 


Officer Survival School 


2 men 


Serial Murders 


2 men 


Background Investigation 


1 man 


Drug Spring Conference 


2 men 


Homicide Investigation 


5 men 


Drug Raid Planning 


2 men 


Victim Abuse Advanced Investigation 1 woman 


- 1 man 


Police Radar 2 women 


-5 men 


Terrorism Seminar 


2 men 


Ruger — Armourers School 


1 man 


Hostage Negotiations 


4 men 


Fingerprint Collection 


2 men 


Street Survival 


1 man 


Street Survival for Narcotic Officer 


2 men 



Child Abuse & Neglect 1 man 

Undercover Investigation 3 men 

Advanced Tactical Operations 1 man 

EMT — refresher 1 man 

Basic Narcotic 1 man 

Lo-Jack Seminar 7 men 

"Crack" Conference 3 men 

Legal Aspects of Investigation 2 men 

Investigators Seminar 1 man 

Terminal Communications 2 men 

VIP — Dignitary Protection Program 1 man 

Infrared Breath Test Operator — Intoxilizer 2 men 

Advanced Photography 1 man 

Sexual Exploitation 1 man 

Identi-Kid 1 man 

In October, the department expanded the duties of the 
Drug and Alcohol Control Unit. In an effort to more 
equitably address the other phase of their intended pur- 
pose, i.e., alcohol concerns, the DACU has been utilized 
in a visible, uniformed operation using marked vehicles 
at certain times on specified main roadways to target drunk 
drivers and other motor vehicle and alcohol-related of- 
fenses. This selective enforcement operation has met with 
much success in the endeavor as is has in its covert drug 
investigations and this administration is confident that its 
addressing the public concern of drunk drivers on the road- 
ways and making Chelmsford a safer town for its citizens. 

I would like to express my sincerest appreciation to the 
Board of Selectmen and all town officials, departments, 
and committees for the excellent cooperation given to the 
Police Department and also congratulate all police and 
civilian personnel of this department for once again, main- 
taining their high performance standards. 

Sincerely, 

Raymond P. McKeon 
Chief of Police 



AUXILIARY POLICE 

This year was a very productive year for the Auxiliary 
Police. We added five new officers to the ranks but, we 
lost some dedicated officers as well and I would like to 
thank them for their service to the town as Auxiliary Police 
Officers. I would also report with great sadness the death 
of long time Auxiliary Co-ordinator retired police Sergeant 
Basil Larkin. Basil was a well known police officer 
throughout the community and was one of the original 
founding members of the Auxiliary Police Department, 
his knowledge and friendship will be greatly missed by 
everyone. We will continue to strive to keep the Auxiliary 
force Basil helped to build one of the best around. 

This past year we had four Officers graduated from the 
Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council Reserve 
Officers Academy in Tewksbury. The Academy meets 3 
hours a week for 14 weeks and covers criminal and motor- 



151 



vehicle laws, traffic control, report writing, and police pro- 
cedures. The officers are certified in CPR (Cardio 
Pulmonary Resuscitation) First Aid and Firearms. The 
Auxiliary Officers assisted the regular police department 
with the Memorial Day Parade, Middlesex County Ken- 
nel Club Dog Show, July 4th parade, Halloween security 
for the school buildings as well as assisting the regulars at 
numerous accident scenes. The Auxiliary Police perform- 
ed 4200 vacant housechecks, 4000 school checks and the 
cruisers covered a total of 40,000 miles during their 
assignments this year. 

As in the past the Auxiliary has' sponsored the Explorer 
Scout Law Enforcement Post #370. These young men and 
women assisted the Auxiliary at every scheduled event. The 
post meets weekly at the Auxiliary building and we assist 
them with training and coordinating their activities. The 
young men and women attend a special Explorer Scout 
Academy in cooperation with the Massachusetts Criminal 
Justice Training Council. 

It is a pleasure to work with these young men and women 
and I'd like to thank them for their assistance throughout 
the year. 

I would like to thank my Auxiliary Officers and their 
families for donating so much of their time to the Town. 
I would like to thank the Chief and Deputy Chiefs for their 
continued support and assistance and a special thanks to 
the Officers of the Police Department for their support and 
assistance over the past year. 

Respectfully submitted 

Sergeant Raymond G. McCusker 
Director Auxiliary Police 

ROSTER 

Director: 

Sergeant Raymond G. McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 



Auxiliary Officers 



John Auger 
Steve Belanger 
Elizabeth Berger 
Kenneth Berger 
Neal Casales 
Eric Gordon 
Jessie Harris 
Ellen Klimm 
Robert Klimm 
Laura Lavoie 
Daniel McLarney 



Eric Merrill 
Edward Norton 
Fred Pomerleau 
Brad Poole 
James Quinn 
Dave Ramsay 
Ralph Roscoe 
Jeff Stinnett 
Michael Taplin 
Paul Villare 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and residents of 
the Town of Chelmsford, I am submitting the annual report 
of activities of this department as Veterans' Agent and In- 
vestigator for the year of 1986. 

Veterans' Benefits is a state mandated organization duly 
authorized under Chapter 115, MGL Section 1 through 15. 
Two valued services are provided. One pertains to assistance 
with federal benefits under the Veterans' Administration, 
the other to financially aid and give assistance to qualified 
veterans and their dependents under Veterans' Benefits. 

Veterans Administration/Federal Expenditures —Town of 
Chelmsford 

Compensation to 
dependents for veterans' 
service-connected death $ 10,200 

Dependents Indemnity 
Compensation (DIC) 210,000 

Sons, daughters, wives and 
widows education 38,000 

Specially adapted housing 
for disabled veterans 3,800 

Veterans' death pension 205,890 

Veterans disability compen- 
sation 1,500,000 
Veterans disability pension 2,525,000 
Veterans insurance and in- 
demnities 235,855 
Veterans re -adjustment 
training 255,000 
Veterans burial awards and 
other miscellaneous benefit 
payments 39,000 
Vocational rehabilitation 
training for disabled 
veterans 10,200 

Presently, I am on the Executive Board, Auditing and 
Finance Committee, for the Massachusetts Veterans' Agents 
Association. I continue to be active with Middlesex Coun- 
ty Veterans' Agents Association. Also, I hold membership 
in American Society of Notaries. 

Goals for 1987: Our continued support to Veterans and 
their families. Stay up-to-date with changes on a State and 
Federal level. 

I wish to express my appreciation to Town Officials, 
"Sprit of Christmas" and other civic organizations for their 
continued cooperation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary K. McAuliffe, LSW 
Certified Veterans' Agent 



152 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

During the year 1986 I investigated 15 dog bites. 

I inspected 67 horses and 5 cows. 93 animals were vac- 
cinated at the Rabies Clinic in April at the McCarthy 
School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Martin A. Gruber, D.V.M. 

INSECT AND PEST CONTROL 

The Insect and Pest Control Department has continued 
with the removal of dead oak and elm trees resulting from 
past Gypsy Moth infestation as well as the Dutch Elm 
Disease. Each year we hope for fewer removals but as yet 
we haven't seen it. Final disposal is becoming more diffi- 
cult each year. 

With the assistance of other agencies this department 
will continue its limited poison ivy programs as needed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard J. Day 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Members 

Daniel Burke, Chairman N. Gustave Fallgren 

Robert L. Kydd, Vice Chairman Eileen M. Duffy 

Harold W. Organ, Jr. 



Robert Scharn 



Alternates 

James K. Flynn 

Clerk 

Marjorie Hennessy 



Ronald Pare 



Hearing Statistics: 

Variances 
Special Permits 
Comprehensive Permit 

Total 



Total Granted Denied Withdrawn 

89 71 14 4 

14 12 2 
1 1 



104 



16 



The Board met, on an average, twice a month during 
1986. There continues to be a high percentage (approx- 
imately 60%) of zoning violations found by lending institu- 
tions when new or second mortgages are reviewed for 
zoning copliance. 



The Board is continued to be faced by landowners or 
speculators with major decisions on issues of building on 
less than compliant or with inadequate size of lots, lots that 
have been in existence for years prior to existing by-laws 
and questionable uses in low areas affecting and detrimen- 
tal to the "intent and purpose" of the Town of Chelmsford 
Zoning By-Laws. 

The future use of land, sub-standard by current regula- 
tions should not be allowed to continue and this is the 
ultimate responsibility of the Board of Appeals. 

On behalf of the Board, I would like to take this oppor- 
tunity to thank all Town Boards and officials for their 
assistance and cooperation during 1986, and a special 
thank you to Selectman Rhodes Johnson for obtaining the 
Board's use of the Selectmen's Meeting Room for Board 
of Appeals hearings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel W. Burke, Chairman 



CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Emergency Coordinator 

Kathryn Brough Depty. Pennryn D. Fitts 

Melvin dejager William W. Edge 

George R. Dixon Capt. Charles S. Galloway 

Raymond Day Donald Savage 

The Emergency Management Committee (Civil Defense) 
has been very active this past year, with various Hazardous 
Materials incidents, Tornado and Hurricane Watches and 
various emergencies throughout the Town. Many volunteer 
hours were spent by members at the Emergency Operating 
Center at Town Offices, and at the site of Emergencies. The 
Committee meets the second Tuesday of each month, 
preparing necessary reports for the State and Federal 
Emergency Management Agencies, various forms and 
reports for surplus equipment at the Mass Surplus 
Warehouse in Taunton. Many volunteer hours were spent 
this past year by the Emergency Coordinator and members 
at Seminars on Natural Disasters, Amateur Radio Com- 
munication, Radiology, and government management. 

We wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, Executive 
Secretary, all Town Department Heads and personnel for 
the outstanding cooperation received this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 



153 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




TOWN CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Front (left to right): Walter R. Hedlund, Dana Caf- 
felle. Rear: James K. Gifford, Ray Day, Charles 
Marderosian 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Walter R. Hedlund, 
Dana Caffelle 
Raymond Day 



Chairman 

James K. Gifford 
Charles Marderosian 



The Celebrations Committee this past year was very ac- 
tive in coordinating and preparing for the 1986 Annual 
Fourth of July Celebration. Once again special thanks to 
the Chelmsford Lodge of Elks, No. 2130 for their funding 
and organizing of the 1986 Annual Parade, the Chelmsford 
Lions Club for their funding and planning of the 1986 An- 
nual Country Fair on the Common. Chelmsford Arts Socie- 
ty for the Arts Festival at the Town Hall, Chelmsford 
Community Band for the Band Concert, Chelmsford 
Alpine Square Dancing Club, Chelmsford Jaycee's for the 
1986 Road Races, special thanks to the various churches in 
the Center Common area for their various activities dur- 
ing the Fourth of July Celebration and for the use of their 
parking areas, also many thanks to the various Town 
organizations that participated in the celebration. We 
thank the efforts of the Police, Fire, Public Works and Park 
Departments personnel for their assistance during the 
celebration. 

Many thanks to the many volunteers of the Chelmsford 
Auxiliary Police and their Explorers Troop for their many 
volunteer hours. The Town Celebrations Committee has 
been meeting monthly in preparation for the Annual 1987 
Fourth of July Celebration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 







Term 


Members 


Responsibilities 


Exp. 


James McBride 


Chairman 


1989 


John Droescher 


Wetlands 


1987 


Karen Flynn 


Wetlands 


1989 


Charles Galloway 


Clerk & Reservation 






Mgt. 


1988 


William R. Greenwood 


Wetlands 


1988 


Judith Hass 


Land Acquisition 


1987 


John Scott 


Treasurer & Land Ac- 






quisition 


1988 


Marjorie Hennessy 


Secretary 





The Conservation Commission continues to keep as its 
primary goal the preservation of the natural and desirable 
aspects of the Town of Chelmsford. 

The duties associated with the local administration of 
the Wetlands Protection Act easily absorb most of the time 
and effort of the Commission members. A total of twenty- 
seven public hearings were held this year in accordance 
with Chapter 131 , Section 40 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. After careful review of each proposed plan, the 
Commission issued twenty-five Orders of Conditions and 
two are still pending. Six hearings were also held for Deter- 
mination of Applicability of the Wetlands Protection Act 
and six Negative Determinations were issued. 

Community involvement in advising the Commission 
when wetlands transgressions begin to happen has been a 
tremendous help in assisting the Commission with the pro- 
tection of the Town's wetland areas. Cooperation between 
Town Boards has enabled the Commission to inform a 
developer at the beginning stages of the development that 
a filing with the Commission would be necessary. This helps 
to avoid costly and unnecessary expenses on the part of 
the town and the developer. 

The Conservation Commission has made a major land 
acquisition this year in the purchase of the Lowell 
Cranberry Company land. The cranberry reservation is a 
2600 acre parcel of land located in the Towns of 
Chelmsford and Carlisle. About 115 acres is located in 
Carlisle and includes about 35 acres of the cranberry bog. 
Chelmsford has 150 acres which includes about 31 acres 
of deep and shallow fresh marsh, 29 acres of open fresh 
marsh, 3 acres of shrub swamp, 87 acres of woodland and 
miscellaneous areas. The Bog Committee comprised of rep- 
resentatives from both towns are making plans for the 
management of the reservation. 

There has been some work done to upgrade conditions 
at the Lime Quarry Reservation and the Wright Reserva- 
tion. Plans are pending for additional work to be done at 
the Wright Reservation. 



154 




Front Row (I to r): L. Mulawski, Regina A. Wojcik, 
Chairman, Paul Logan, Treasurer. Back Row (I to r): 
Nancy Desjardins, Secretary, Sandy McDonald, Co- 
Chairman, Mary St. Hilaire, Alice Beauvais (not shown), 
shown). 



son who: Has a physical or mental impairment which 
substantially limits one or more major life activities; Has 
a record of such impairment or is regarded as having such 
impairments as spelled out in Section 504 of the Rehabilita- 
tion Act of 1973. 

The powers and duties of the Commission shall include 
the following but not limited to: 

1. To insure the equal status of the handicapped in 
education, employment, economic, political, health, 
legal and social spheres. 

2. To design and implement programs that promote 
equality for all handicapped in the town. 

3. To review recommendations and policies of all 
departments, divisions, and agencies of the town. 

4. To initiate, coordinate, and monitor the enactment 
of legislation which promotes equal status of the han- 
dicapped in the town, state or federal levels, and to 
insure that appropriate regulations are adopted and 
enforced pursuant to such legislation, including but 
not limited to implementation of Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 



CHELMSFORD COMMISSION ON 
HANDICAPPED AFFAIRS 

The following is the Annual Report for the Chelmsford 
Commission on Handicapped Affairs for the year 1986. 

The Commission was formed as a result of a state man- 
date which was subsequently approved at Town Meeting 
by Chelmsford voters. 

It shall be the function of the Commission to: 



5. To assist in the planning and coordination of activities 
of all departments and divisions. 

6. To participate in an advisory capacity in the hear- 
ing of complaints brought alleging discrimination 
against the handicapped including but not limited 
to the Office of Affirmative Action. 

7. To obtain from the town departments, divisions and 
agencies any and all information necessary to carry 
out the functions, purposes, programs and activities 
of the Commission. 



Act as a centralizing force in the town of Chelmsford and 
the community which will deal with all handicapped issues; 
providing information, referral,' guidance, coordination, 
offering and providing technical assistance to other public 
agencies and private persons, organizations and institutions 
engaged in activities and programs intended to eliminate 
prejudice and discrimination against person(s) with handi- 
cap^) or because of their status as a person with a handi- 
cap or as a minority person with a handicap. 

Assure that no otherwise qualified individual with a han- 
dicap in the town of Chelmsford shall, solely by reason of 
his/her handicap, be excluded from participation, be 
denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination 
under any program or activity within the town of Chelms- 
ford without efforts being made to make reasonable ac- 
commodations for qualified handicapped persons unless 
the accommodation would impose undue hardship. To 
coordinate or carry out programs designed or meet the pro- 
blems of the handicapped in coordination with programs 
of the Office of Handicapped Affairs. 

A person with a handicap shall be defined as any per- 



8. To assist the public awareness of the handicapped 
through participation in public media events spon- 
sored by the administrative and/or legislative bodies 
of the town sponsored recreational, education, and 
development activities. 

9. To research local problems of the handicapped and 
participate and coordinate the activities of other local 
groups organized for similar purposes. 

10. To receive gifts of property, both real and personal, 
in the name of the town, subject to approval of The 
Board of Selectmen, such gifts to be managed and 
controlled by the Commission. 

11. Subject to appropriations by the Board of Select- 
men advertise, prepare, print, and distribute books, 
maps, charts, plans and pamphlets necessary for its 
work. 

12. To acquire, analyze, use and store disabled related 
statistics and related materials for program plann- 
ing and evaluation purposes. 



155 



13. To keep records of its meetings and actions. 

14. To serve on the Commission without compensation. 

15. To hold at least six meetings annually. 

16. To recruit and recommend member to the Commis- 
sion subsequent to the appointment by The Board 
of Selectmen. 

Membership, Appointment, Terms and Removal 

1. The Commission shall consist of not more than seven 
(7) members, all of whom shall be appointed by The 
Board of Selectmen. A majority of five (5) members, 
shall consist of handicapped persons, and one (1) of 
such members may be a member of the immediate 
family of such handicapped person and one (1) 
member shall be either an elected or appointed of- 
ficial of the town. 

2 . The terms of the first members of said Commission 
shall be for one (1), two (2), or three (3) years and 
so arranged that the terms of one of the members 
expires each year, and their successors shall be ap- 
pointed for terms of three (3) years each. 

Respectfully submitted by: 

Regina A. Wojick, Chairman 

Sandra McDonald, Vice Chairman 

Paul Logan, Treasurer 

Nancy Desjardins, Secretary 

Alice Beauvais 

Laurie A. Mulawski 

Mary St. Hilaire 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Chelmsford Council on Aging worked en- 
thusiastically during the year with design plans for the pro- 
posed new Chelmsford Senior Center. This was made 
possible with the approval of the North School location and 
funding for preliminary design approved at the January, 
1986 Special Town Meeting. The final designs were com- 
pleted in the Fall and presented to the townspeople once 
again at the Special Town Meeting in December, 1986. The 
proposal was approved unanimously, contingent upon debt 
exemption from Proposition 2^ to be approved in the 
April, 1987 local election. We look forward to this final 
step so that Chelmsford will realize a new Senior Center 
in the near future. 

A variety of programs and services continue to be 
delivered to older residents and coordinated at the Louise 
Bishop Senior Center. Some of the regular programs in- 
cluded special lectures and crafts, health screening, income 
tax assistance, support groups and recreation. Also 
available at other locations are the elderly lunch program, 
meals on wheels, exercise/dance classes and the co- 



sponsored public library Mid-Day Forum series. The Coun- 
cil on Aging sponsored transportation completed 4798 
passenger trips for elderly residents. The Respite Care pro- 
gram, co-sponsored by Chelmsford and Westford, provid- 
ed support to more than 50 Chelmsford families in 1986. 
The Council was successful in 1986 in establishing town- 
funded home delivered meals coordinator position and 
hired Helen Palmgren, a long time Senior Aide and 
volunteer. The Council was also able to expand the pro- 
gram with the support of the Chelmsford School Food Ser- 
vice, which provided meals during ordinary school 
vacations. 

The Council is very fortunate to have the dedicated ser- 
vices of Senior Aides Lois Manty, Emily Mcintosh, and a 
new employee hired in October, 1986, Mary Panzica. The 
Senior Aides continue to provide regular contact to more 
than 200 clients during the year. 

As a participating member of Elder Services of the Mer- 
rimack Valley, older residents once again received the home 
care services which allowed them to remain in the com- 
munity. Programs employed home makers, chore workers 
and case managers, who provided vital support needed to 
remain independent. Other programs sponsored through 
Elder Services: funded local elderly health programs, legal 
services, protective services, mental health programs, and 
guardianship services. 

The Friends of the Senior Center raised more than 
$40,000.00 during the year for the Chelmsford Senior 
Center Building Fund. These proceeds will be used to pur- 
chase equipment and furniture for the new Senior Center. 

The Council would like to thank the townspeople and 
Town officials for their support and cooperation throughout 
the year and also recognize the many volunteers who 
regularly contributed their time to serve our older citizens. 
We look forward to the continued support and commitment 
necessary to see that Chelmsford does have a new Senior 
Center in the near future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Allen Bennett, Chairman 

Ashton Ricker, Vice Chairman 

Esther Christensen, Treasurer 

Kathleen McDonald, Secretary 

John Cryan 

Paul Dube 

Annette Holtzman 

Howard Moore 

Fern Ricker 

Kathleen Robinson 



156 



CHELMSFORD CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Current Members 

Flavia Cigliano, Chairman 

Joy Chadwick, Co-Chairman 

Marion Gould, Arts Lottery Chairman and Treasurer 

Pat Fitzpatrick, Corresponding Secretary 

Helen Glinos 

Ivor Hartley 

James Turcotte 

Two resignations were accepted this year: Gina Kalogero- 
poulos and William Baird. 

Meetings: 

The second Monday of each month. 

The second and fourth Monday of March and October 

In 1986 the Chelmsford Cultural Council worked towards 
fulfilling its dual function in the community: first, to 
oversee the use of the Old Town Hall as the cultural center 
for the town and second, to administer funds allocated to 
Chelmsford by the Massachusetts Arts Lottery Council. 

The major undertaking of the Cultural Council regar- 
ding the Old Town Hall was the installation of large 
acoustical panels on the walls of Veterans' Auditorium in 
order to help control the excessive reverberations in the hall. 
A number of musical groups had suggested that steps be 
taken to change the sound quality since they were experien- 
cing difficulties in their rehearsals and performances. The 
panels are now in place and hopefully have improved the 
acoustics. 

The principal responsibility of the Chelmsford Cultural 
Council is the evaluation of proposals for and the awar- 
ding of grants from the Massachusetts Arts Lottery Coun- 
cil. During the two funding cycles, one in May and another 
in November, the Cultural Council receives an average of 
fifteen proposals from cultural groups in town or from out- 
side organizations whose projects will benefit Chelmsford 
residents. In 1986 twenty-five different projects were fully 
or partially funded ranging from a book on local ar- 
chaeological digs to guest storytellers for the Chelmsford 
elementary schools. 

The PASS Program (Performing Arts Student Series), 
also a Massachusetts Arts Lottery program, was initiated 
in October 1986. Through this program, the Cultural 
Council disburses funds to the Chelmsford public schools 
for students to attend performing arts events. This past 
December four hundred fifth graders attended A Christmas 
Carol at the Merrimack Repertory Theater. 

This year the Chelmsford Cultural Council sponsored 
a highly-successful Christmas concert featuring Irish holi- 
day music. Although it was the first Council-initiated event, 
it was very well received by the public, evidenced by the 
capacity crowd at the Old Town Hall. 



We look forward in the next year to playing a more ac- 
tive role in sponsoring arts events, as well as continuing 
our role in administering Massachusetts Arts Lottery funds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Flavia Cigliano, Chairman 
Chelmsford Cultural Council 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

This year the Historical Commission continued its 
maintenance of historic markers on various properties in 
town including Historic District and Middlesex Canal 
markers. The 1802 Schoolhouse, where the Commission's 
meetings are held, was repainted as well as the Middlesex 
Canal Toll House on the Town Common. The Historical 
Commission also acted as an advisory group to local in- 
dividuals and developers in preservation of our town's 
heritage in its buildings and scenic roads. Inventories of 
historic property were submitted to the State Historical 
Commission, as required, by this commission. 

Membership: Martha P. Sanders, Chairman 

J. Perry Richardson 

Jane Drury 

Joseph V. Kopycinski* 

D. Lawrence Fadjo 

Florence Gullion 

John Goodwin 

•deceased 1/87 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Members 

John P. Richardson, Chairman 
Richard O. Lahue, Sr. 
Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D. 
Harold J. Davis, Vice Chairman 
Harold J. Linnerud 

Alternate 

Richard Burkinshaw 

Clerk 

Mary E. Caffelle 

The Historic District Commission met regularly at the 
1802 Schoolhouse on the first Monday of each month. 
Special meetings were also scheduled, when necessary dur- 
ing the year. 

The Commission accepted 26 applications for Cer- 
tificates of Appropriateness. 20 public hearings were held. 
8 were waived by the Commission when the architectural 
features involved were deemed to have an insubstantial ef- 



157 



feet on the Historic District and after the owners of all ad- 
joining property were notified and had expressed no 
objection. 

There were 20 Certificates of Appropriateness and 5 Cer- 
tificates of Non-applicability or Hardship issued by the 
Commission during the year. 1 Certificate of Appropriate- 
ness was denied. 

The members of the Historic Commission are pleased 
that they have been instrumental in assisting the communi- 
ty to protect and preserve its cultural heritage. The pro- 
perty owners within the district deserve a special thanks 
from the Commission and the citizens of Chelmsford for 
their continued cooperation in maintaining appropriate 
construction and alterations within the district. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. Richardson, Chairman 



review the plans. Their goal was to simplify the 
specifications and get them within range of the ap- 
propriated funds. 

As 1986 ends, the plans are with the Town Engineer and 
the Building Inspector. We expect the plans to be approved 
in the near future, and go out for bid. 

Our goal in 1987 is to have a dog pound built and opera- 
tional for the Town of Chelmsford. 

This committee is committed to the completion of that 
goal. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Linda J. Allen, Chairperson 



DOG POUND COMMITTEE 

Members of the Committee 

Linda Allen, Chairperson 
Pennryn Fitts, Vice Chairperson 
Mary E. St.Hilaire, Clerk 
Franklin Warren 
Robert Carlson 
John P. Emerson, Jr. 
Frederick Gavriel 

In 1986 the Dog Pound Committee's activities included: 

Withdrawal from the County Dog and Licensing 
system. 

Approval by Annual Town Meeting of new bylaws 
pertaining to dogs. Pennryn Fitts drafted these by- 
laws, after carefully analyzing the current bylaws. 

Specifications for the dog pound were approved in 
March. 

In June, the bidding process began — one bid was 
received at $169,000, $119,000 over budget. 

In July, the committee sent a letter to the Board of 
Selectmen expressing our dissatisfaction with the ar- 
chitect and the time he took to produce the plans. 
We also expressed concern with the expensive plans. 

In October, the committee met again to discuss con- 
cern over the plans. Although the architect resub- 
mitted plans, the committee felt the plans were still 
too excessive. We brought our concerns to the Select- 
men's meeting that night. The Selectmen voted to ar- 
range for their Executive Secretary, the Town 
Engineer, and the Building Inspector to meet and 



HOLIDAY DECORATIONS COMMITTEE 

List of Members 

Dana Caffelle, Chairman & Recording Secretary 

Jeanne Parlee, Vice Chairperson 

Nancy Leonard, Corresponding Secretary 

Dawn Siphol, Publicity 

Gail Lapan, Treasurer 

Richard O. Lahue, Sr. , Work Committee Chairman 

Helen George Carolee Hill Charles Parlee 



Work Committee 



Brian Leonard 
Ted Siphol 



Bruce Foucar 
Bill Lapan 



The Holiday Decorations Committee met regularly at 
the Town Offices on the third Monday of each month, ex- 
cept there were no meetings in July and August. 

For the past four years the Holiday Decorations Com- 
mittee has been working at decorating the Center Com- 
mons with white lights and decorating the Center section 
with Flags between April and November. 

Accomplishments 

1. This past year we purchased twelve more flags bring- 
ing our total to 87 which have been donated by the 
townspeople, organizations, and/or businesses. 

2. This past year we had Boy Scout Troop #70 from the 
West Chelmsford Methodist Church responsible for 
displaying the 60 flags from April (Patriots' Day) 
through November (Veterans' Day). 

3. Once again we had a very successful Lighting 
Ceremony, December 7, 1986, on the Center Com- 
mon. This year's participants were: Santa Claus, 
Chelmsford Community Band, Byam School 4th & 
5th Grade Chorus, and the Central Baptist Church 
served refreshments following the ceremonies. 



158 



4. Once again, we added more lights to the shrubs 
nearest the Central Baptist Church. 

5. Solicited enough funds to continue operations. 

Goals 

1. To become a Town Funded Committee so more time 
can be given to the Flags and Common Lighting Ac- 
tivities than soliciting funds. 

2. "lb continue replacing the older lights, some of which 
were used to decorate the old large pine tree which 
has been cut down for several years on the common 
near Jack's Diner. 

3. To replace the bulbs and lights that have been either 
broken or stolen. This year we had to replace a string 
of lights and more than three dozen bulbs. 

4. Since we have purchased the additional dozen flags, 
we need to expand our locations. We plan on adding 
them along Academy Street, further down North 
Road towards the Center Fire Station, around the 
common near Jack's Diner, and possibly around the 
large flag pole, and down Chelmsford Street a little 
further. 

5. We are in search of a new Boy Scout Troop to take 
over this years responsibilities of displaying the Towns- 
people's Flags. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dana Caffelle, Chairman 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



MEMBERS 



Robert Charpentier 
Evelyn Newman 
Harry Ayotte 
Robert Hayes 
Steven Hone 
Bruce MacDonald 
Paul Murphy 
Joan Murray 
Lorraine Murphy 



Chairman 

Vice Chairman 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Part-time Clerk 



The major portion of the Commission's activities is, and 
always has been, connected with organized youth activities. 
The Commission provides very limited funding for these 
activities; its main contribution to their success is as a 
liaison between organizations and other Town authorities, 
including the School Committee, the Board of Selectmen, 
the Parks Department and the Varney Commission. In- 
deed, the success of these youth activities would not be 
possible without the continued cooperation of these com- 
munity authorities, especially in the area of scheduling 
fields and gymnasiums for all recreational activities. 

Participation in the Summer Program continues to in- 
crease with the following activities being offered through- 
out the Summer months: Physical Education, outside and 
inside Basketball, Tennis lessons, Playground Programs at 
Varney Playground, Westland School and South Row 
School, a Swim and Swimming Lessons Program at 
Freeman Lake, Cross Country Track and Field at the High 
School Track. A seven week series of free programs for 
children is offered on Wednesday mornings throughout the 
Summer at the Town Offices gymnasium. A series of Con- 
certs on the Common by the Chelmsford Community Band 
takes place on Tuesday evenings throughout the Summer. 

The Southwell Field Project is progressing. After some 
delays bids have gone out and construction should take 
place in the Spring and Summer of 1987. 

Conservation land, through the efforts of the Conserva- 
tion Commission, the Board of Selectmen, the Recreation 
Commission and Chelmsford Soccer Association, will be 
developed for use as Soccer Fields on Mill Road. Through 
the donation of labor and equipment by Mr. Finnegan of 
Drum Hill Construction Company, funds donated by 
Russell Mill Swim Club, and the cooperation of the 
Highway Department who cleared the area, this project 
is well on its way. The development of these Soccer Fields 
should help to rest and restore the remaining Town fields. 

The Boys/Girls Club Committee has established a con- 
tract with Dan Butler Associates of New York to perform 
a Feasibility Study which will begin March 2 and should 
be finished the middle of April. This organization has had 
success on 15 such projects for Boys/Girls Clubs. There are 
still some items to work out but with the cooperation of 
the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee the site 
chosen is adjacent to McCarthy Middle School, between 
the football field and Davis Road. Incorporation papers 
are being filed by Joseph Shanahan, the Incorporating Of- 
ficer, and officers will be Judy Wilson, President, Robert 
Charpentier, Vice President and Sharon DeSisto, Treasurer. 



The Chelmsford Recreation Commission is appointed by 
the Board of Selectmen. The Commission is charged with 
the responsibility of developing, administering and suppor- 
ting programs and facilities designed to fill the recreation 
needs of the residents of the Town. 



159 



SIGN ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Sign Advisory Committee, during its twelve mon- 
thly meetings, reviewed many sign permit applications. 
Sixty-nine conformed to the Town by-laws and were ap- 
proved. 

In the next two years the Sign Advisory Committee plans 
to produce a booklet to help interpret the sign by-laws. 

We are happy to welcome former Building Inspector 
Ronald Wetmore and Chelmsford businessman Henry 
Hamelin to the Committee. Other members are: Debbie 
Dion, John Harrington and Chairman Jean Rook. Building 
Inspector Tony Zagzoug participates in every meeting. 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
January 1st, 1986 through December 31st, 1986 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



Balance on Hand as of January 1st. 1986: $10,888.77 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Interest: $207.98 

The Comfed Savings Bank, Lowell. 
Mass. 

Interest 314.65 

The Lowell Five Cent Savings 
Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest: 441.36 

Total Interest Received: 963,99 

Total Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1986 and Receipts:. . 11,852.76 

Deduct Disbursements None 

Balance on Hand as of December 31st. 1986 11.852.76 

ASSSETS 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Account No. 128790 3,887.52 

Comfed Savings Bank. Lowell. Mass. 

Account No. 4574000012 3,387.64 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank. Lowell. Mass. 

Account No. 440007431 4,577.60 

Total Assets 11.852.76 

LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities None 

Total Assets. Less Liabilities $11,852.76 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 

It was a very quiet year for the Veterans' Emergency Fund 
Committee inasmuch as no applications for assistance were 
received from the Veterans' Agent nor were any inquiries 
received from the Veterans of World War II. When applica- 
tions are received they are carefully investigated by the 
Veterans' Agent, and later by committee members. When 
assistance is granted, it is always in the form of material 
grants, such as payment of medical bills, utility bills, rent 
or clothing bills. 

The fund was established during 1947 and over the in- 
tervening years numerous veterans have been assisted. 

The fund now totals more than $11,000.00 and is com- 
prised of three bank accounts. One is a regular passbook 
savings account so that funds can be made available 
without delay. Also there are two fixed rate Certificates of 
Deposit; one earning at the rate of 9.75% and another at 
the rate of 10 % Annually. A treasurer's report also appears 
in the Annual Report. 

The list of names of present members of the committee 
is printed below, in the event that future applicants for 
assistance may wish to make inquiries for information. 



Precinct 1: 

Robert E. Donaldson 
Precinct 2: 

Russell S. Butterfield 
Precinct 3: 

James J. Walker 
Precinct 4: 

John J. McNulty 
Precinct 5: 

George E Waite 
Precinct 6: 

Alfred H. Coburn 



Precinct 7: 

Carl J. Lebedzinski 
Precinct 8: 

Herbert T. Knutson 
Precinct 9: 

Russell E. Starck 
Precinct 10: 

Melvin P. dejager 
Precinct 11: 

Harold C. Giffin 
Precinct 12: 

Robert T Clough 



Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee, 



The committee members extend their appreciation to 
the various Town Officials, to the Veterans' Agent, and 
Staff, and town employees who have assisted the commit- 
tee during past years. 

Respectfully yours, 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 
Town of Chelmsford 

Alfred H. Coburn, Chairman 



Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OFFICES 

50 BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MASS. 01824-2777 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town corrmittee, please 
fill our this form and mail to: Executive Secretary, Board of Selectmen, 
Town Offices, 50 Billerica Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824. The filling out 
of this form in no way assures appointment. All committee vacancies will 
be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. 

NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE 

ADDRESS AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK. 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE. 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING. 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS. 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointments to Town Committees 160 

Appointed Town Officials 139 

Board of Appeals 152 

Board of Assessors 116 

Board of Registrars 121 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Celebrations Committee 153 

Chelmsford Commission on Handicapped Affairs 154 

Civil Defense Commission 152 

Conservation Commission 153 

Council on Aging 155 

Cultural Council 156 

Dog Pound Committee 157 

Elected Town Officials 115 

Engineering Department 147 

Fire Department 148 

General Information 3 

Health Department 116 

Highway Department 145 

Historical Commission 156 

Historic District Commission 156 

Holiday Decorations Committee 157 

Housing Authority 118 

Insect Pest Control 152 

Inspector of Animals 152 

Inspections Department 147 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 118 

Park Department 119 

Planning Board 119 

Police Department 149 

Police —Auxiliary 150 

Public Libraries 120 

Recreation Commission 158 

School Committee 122 

Sewer Commission 138 

Sign Advisory Committee 159 

Town Accountant 141 

Town Clerk 6 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting January 27, 1986 8 

Special Town Meeting January 27, 1986 10 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting April 5 and April 28, 1986 14 

Town Election Results 29 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting May 12, 1986 30 

Annual Town Meeting April 28, 1986 46 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 5, 1986 52 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 12, 1986 62 

Special Town Meeting May 12, 1986 63 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 19, 1986 80 

Adjourned Special Town Meeting May 19, 1986 80 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 27, 1986 82 

Special Town Meeting May 27, 1986 85 

Adjourned Special Town Meeting June 9, 1986 85 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting September 25, 1986 86 

Special Town Meeting September 25, 1986 91 

Warrant for State Elections November 4, 1986 103 

State Election Results 106 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting December 6, 1986 109 

Special Town Meeting December 8, 1986 Ill 

Town Directory Back Cover 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 139 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 159 

Veterans' Services - 151 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting: 256-3621 

Assessors: 256-2031 

Board of Appeals Clerk: 256-7164 (12:30-4:30 p.m.) 

Building Inspector: 256-8346 

(Yard Sales, Kennel Permits & Bldg. Permits) 
Cemetery Garage: 256-8671 
Community Teamwork: 459-0551 

Conservation Commission: 256-7164 (12:30-4:30 p.m.) 
Council on Aging: 256-0013 
Dog Officer: 256-0754 
Fire Department: 256-2543 
Gas Inspector: 256-8347 
Health Department: 256-2061 
Highway Department: 256-2161 

Garage: 251-4841 
High School, Richardson Rd.: 251-8792 
Housing Authority, Wilson St.: 256-7425 
Housing for the Elderly, Wilson St.: 256-7425 
Libraries: Adams — 256-5521; McKay— 251-3212 
Massachusetts Electric Co.: 459-1431 
Park Department Garage: 256-5073 
Planning Board Clerk: 256-6491 
Plumbing Inspector: 453-2746 
Police Department: 256-2521 
Post Office (Center): 256-2361 

Recreation Comm.: 256-0028 (8:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.) 
Registry of Deeds: 458-8474 
Registry of Motor Vehicles: 459-9397 
School Dept., 75 Graniteville Rd. 251-4981 
Selectmen: 256-2441 
Sewer Commission: 250-1727 
Supt. of Public Buildings: 256-0577 
Town Aide: 256-0013 
Town Clerk: 256-4104 
Town Engineer: 256-1204 
Treasurer/Tax Collector: 256-2122 
Veterans' Agent: 256-2122 
Water Department (Center): 256-2381 
Welcome Wagon: 256-0847 



Welfare: 454-8061, 33 Middle St. Lowell 

Wiring Inspector: 256-8347 

24-hr. Juror Hot Line (Toll Free) 800-792-5117 

POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS; 

Precinct 1: The New Town Office Building Gymnasium 

Precinct 2: Harrington School Gymnasium 

Precinct 3: Harrington School Gymnasium 

Precinct 4: Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 5: Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6: Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7: Harrington School Gymnasium 

Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 9: South Row School Cafeteria 

Precinct 10: South Row School Cafeteria 

Precinct 11: Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12: McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

Senators Edward Kennedy & John F. Kerry 

JFK Federal Building, 

Government Center, Boston, MA 02203 

Russell Office Bldg. 

Washington, D.C. 20510 

Rep. Carol C. Cleven: 

Room 36, State House 

Boston, MA 02133 

722-2470 (Office) 

Home: 4 Arbutus Ave. 

Chelmsford, MA 01824 256-5043 

Senator Carol Amick 

Room 416 A, State House 

Boston, MA 02133 722-1572 (office) 

Home: 18 Crescent Rd., Bedford 275-2644 

Congressman Chester G. Atkins 

Cannon Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 

Middlesex County Commissioners 

494-4100 Superior Courthouse, 

E. Cambridge, MA 02141